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79 of 81 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Yet...
This has been nothing but a massive achievement for Conn Iggulden. To follow up on Emperor with Genghis Khan was a massive risk as the story doesn't have the same level of interest we associate with Caesar and Rome, but it has paid off spectacularly.
The story began with the Wolfs of the Plains and how a young Genghis managed to comeback from being rejected by his...
Published on 10 Sept. 2008 by J. Nicholson

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Conqueror's Conclusion
The third book in the Conqueror series is again first rate historical fiction though considering quite how impressive the first two were, this is the weakest offering. Still, that is only because Wolf of the Plains and Lords of the Bow were quite so impressive that Bones of the Hills is a poorer relation. In its own right, the concluding part of the tale of Temujin is a...
Published on 18 Sept. 2009 by MLA


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79 of 81 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Yet..., 10 Sept. 2008
By 
This review is from: Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) (Hardcover)
This has been nothing but a massive achievement for Conn Iggulden. To follow up on Emperor with Genghis Khan was a massive risk as the story doesn't have the same level of interest we associate with Caesar and Rome, but it has paid off spectacularly.
The story began with the Wolfs of the Plains and how a young Genghis managed to comeback from being rejected by his tribe to uniting them all under the same banner. The second book continued with Genghis's first main campaigns in which the Mongol tribes came against armies much larger and more advanced from their own and of course the epic Badger Pass.
One of my main worries about this book was that the sheer scale of the Lords of the Bow could not be surpassed, but in a way this book managed to equal or at least better it. Instead of constant victories we have something more. The story between Genghis and his sons is excellent and we also get encounter some resistance from the Muslim prince who sees it as his destiny to defeat Genghis in the name of Islam.

Like all his previous books once you pick them up, they're impossible to put down. Another epic.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Epics Continue, 10 Sept. 2008
By 
Mr. I. C. Davies "Ian Davies" (Bristol, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) (Hardcover)
Like most others who read Iggulden's works, I have read both Emperor also. At first I couldn't see Genghis Khan being as easy to adapt to as the legendary figure of Julius, but Conn Iggulden simply proved most of us wrong.

Iggulden has the skill to make a flowing piece of historical fiction which brings to life personalities of epic figures in history whom we all wish we could understand on a more human-level. This book continues explaining how Genghis turns from boy to a ruthless and legendary figure and that development carries the book series from strength to strength.

One note I feel is work mention is that as with the Emperor series we start to see a slight detachment from what Genghis is feeling inside, and his emotion seems to become detached and what he feels seems to be explained more by his generals than Iggulden's direct explanation of his thinking. I suppose this makes sense considering it creates a more substantial aura of the Khan, changing into a figure beyond belief. I personally found it worked, but missed the opportunity to be told his direct feelings unlike his childhood in the earlier books.

All in all it is a brilliant piece of writing, and no one can bring historical figures like this to life like this author. Enjoy the read!
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Yet..., 11 Sept. 2008
This review is from: Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) (Hardcover)
What can I say, the best book of the series. All three books are superb but this is the icing on the cake. Like the last review I believe the risk he took writing about Khan after the equally superb Emperor series was a true testament to Conn's writing ablaties. It's not easy getting people to read about someone not very known compared to cesar but he did it and produced some of the finest books in the Conqueror series and with Bones of the Hills he draws you in futher to this fasanating man. Buy the other two and enjoy the read. I did.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cracker, 17 Oct. 2008
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) (Hardcover)
When Conn originally announced a plan to tackle the days of Genghis Khan it was something that left a lot of people thinking if he'd be able to carry on with the success of his Caesar series. Yet the series has continued to go from strength to strength as Conn's writing style continues to improve along with his story telling abilities. The fact that very little is truly known about Genghis allows him so much more freedom with the tale bringing the reader into the world of conflict of the 12/13th Centuries.

On a cautionary note, if you enjoy reading the Historical genre you're going to become a fan of this author with very little effort so much so that to be honest after I've read a book by Conn I have to leave Historical fiction for a little bit as I always feel disappointed by the next book I read as it isn't up to the levels set by him. It's a bad thing really but it does go to show the quality of his work. Here Conn continues the tale of the Khans from the Sea of Grass and will leave you in no doubt as to why they made the impact upon the world that they did making this book entertaining, cracking and above all nigh impossible to put down until the final page is turned. Don't read if you have work the following morning as to be honest, you'll be calling in sick due to lack of sleep.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thankyou for such a wonderful read, 6 Sept. 2008
By 
C. Collins (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) (Hardcover)
Having been an avid fan of the emperor series I have to admit I bought the wolf of the plains with some degree of scepticism. However the whole trilogy is an absolute masterpiece! I read the last book in one day as I just could not put the thing down. If you overlook this series of books you are really missing out.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant end to an amazing Hiatorical Trilogy!, 20 Feb. 2009
This review is from: Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) (Hardcover)
WOW! What an ending to what is probably the best historical fiction i've ever read. Iggulden has created a world were as a reader I can close my eyes and see myself standing next to the great Genghis himself, I can taste the salt tea in my mouth and feel the air going through my hair as I ride one of the famous Mongol mounts. Yes this trilogy is just that good! As a fan of his previous Emperor novels I knew I would be in for a treat reading this trilogy, but honestly there is no way did I think he could trump his Emperor novels, he has, in every aspect, from his character building to his writing style. All I can say is, brilliant!

In this last sweeping novel Genghis sets his sites on the Muslim world, after his Mongol diplomats are executed on site his sets the mongol nation on course that will see them through wars that they could never have imagined. Pitting his skills against the Shah Mohammed not only that though, he has to solve a crisis in his own ranks as his sons grow to men and argue over the right to lead after Genghis has gone. Will armies of Genghis be destroyed by the Shah's forces or will his sons destroy what he has worked so hard to build?

If you want to read history at it's best then Iggulden creates a masterpiece of history ans story telling, by far one of the best authors around today.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast and furious, 20 Oct. 2011
By 
Lance Mitchell (Hampshire, UK, Northern Hemisphere, Planet Earth) - See all my reviews
This is great writing. It is what historical fiction is all about and is why this is my favourite genre. I really wish that I could write like this.

Conn Iggulden excels at bringing the characters and the events to life. It is fast and furious. It is captivating. It is heavily atmospheric. Well done Mr Iggulden; again!

As Ghengis recalls his armies from Chin and other distant outposts so that his united Mongol forces can wage more terror towards the south and west, huge rivalries brew up and approach boiling point. These rivalries are at their hottest amongst his own family members, and become particularly intense as the Great Khan announces his successor.

Having read the previous two books in the series, and you really must before you open this one, you will be expecting a high dosage of gruesome brutality. You will not be disappointed. In fact, I can confidently predict that your expectations will be exceeded. However, all of that brutality is in context and is absolutely necessary.

This book will stir your emotions. Iggulden builds the characters up to such an extent that you will feel that you know all of them very well. You will have your favourites, and there will be those whom you will hate. You will feel that many of your new-found friends and acquaintances, and those characters from the previous episodes, are treated unfairly, and you will be awaiting the awful revenge.

There is one particular character in this series whom you will probably already dislike and distrust if you have read thus far. Will he escape, or will he die a horrible death? You can probably guess which, but I won't spoil it by revealing his identity, and you will almost certainly know who I mean when you have read the book. I'll be surprised if you don't.

I can't say much more without adding spoilers. You'll just have to read it, and I hope that you enjoy it as much as I did. It has been a long wait, for me, since I read Lords of the Bow, but it has been worth the wait.(
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unable to put down, 8 Sept. 2008
The powerful and exhilarating third novel in Conn Iggulden's No. 1 bestselling Conqueror series, following the life and adventures of the mighty Genghis Khan The fatherless boy, exiled from his tribe, whom readers have been following in 'Wolf of the Plains' and 'Lords of the Bow', has grown into the great king, Genghis Khan. He has united the warring tribes and even taken his armies against the great cities of their oldest enemies. Now he finds trouble rising west of the Mongolian plains. His emissaries are mutilated or killed; his trading gestures rebuffed. So, dividing his armies, using his sons as generals of the various divisions, he sends them out in all directions, ranging as far as modern Iran and Iraq. As well as discovering new territories, exacting tribute from conquered peoples, laying waste the cities which resist, this policy is also a way of diffusing the rivalries between his sons and heirs and working out who should succeed the khan. This, the third book in the series, is an epic story. Genghis Khan is an exhilarating and heroic figure.The sense of his ambition and his power, the relationships with his wives, sons and trusted aides, the sweep of his conquests, is all brought together by a master storyteller. I have this book for a week and find it difficult to put down and am looking forward with great anticipation for my next Iggulden read. If you have enjoyed the Julius Ceaser series then this is also a must for your collection. Hope this is of use to you and I hope you enjoy a high adventure read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Non-stop action, as good as the others - and pre-feminist!!!, 5 Feb. 2010
By 
Angela (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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No disappointment in this conclusion to the trilogy - just as fast, full of action and like the best historical fiction, it made me think about how these people would have lived in a way no textbook can. I'm not a literature student - I just want to know if a book left me satisfied or not, and this did. It was more thought-provoking than the earlier books, and I liked the depiction of Jelaudin and the respect he and Genghis had for each other. I haven't seen many other reviews by women and I'm not surprised, because this is the opposite of chick-lit!! I found it mildly amusing that the first two books only really seemed to consider women as spoils of war or the mother or wife of the Khan. I was left wondering if Conn Iggulden had ever talked to a girl, but he dedicates the book to his kids so he presumably has!!! But seriously, I wasn't at all miffed by this - the novel is about Mongol warriors after all, not a feminist text... The women do get more of a look-in this time, and I liked the bit about Genghis feeling uncomfortable when he saw his two wives talking together. On a separate note, I was looking for a read for a bit of fun and was relieved that generally no moral judgements were required in this series, as all parties to the wars seem fairly awful that it's hard to feel sorry for anyone. This is uncomplicated action - don't read it expecting to find much in the way of emotion!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Master Storyteller, 29 Dec. 2008
By 
Sheumais (Dundee, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) (Hardcover)
The BBC broadcast a television series about the Mongol empire (Storm from the East?) some years ago and that stimulated my interest in Genghis Khan. Having read the Emperor series, I couldn't get my hands on the new series quickly enough. They were never a disappointment and are concluded in style with this one. I found myself immersed in the clash of battle, the heat of the desert and the chill of the mountains, almost as if I was there to see it unfold for myself. The author is a wonderful storyteller, empathising with the central character without excusing some of his actions and I cannot recommend these books highly enough.
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Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3)
Bones of the Hills (Conqueror, Book 3) (Conqueror 3) by Conn Iggulden (Hardcover - 1 Sept. 2008)
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