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118 of 128 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book of Delights
This book isn't quite what I was expecting. Rather than a narrative, it is written as a series of musings and snapshots of typically British foods, ways of eating, British eccentricities and Slater's own memories of certain foods.

It includes all the foods you'd expect (Marmite, Coleman's mustard, Abbey Crunch Biscuits et al) but also some more unusual but very...
Published on 7 Oct 2007 by Sarah Durston

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36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Missed opportunity
I must begin by confessing I am huge Slater fan and (sad case that I am) own all his publications to date, except 'Thirst'. However, I fully agree with many of the reviewer's comments on 'Eating For England'.

This latest volume is a missed opportunity. The subject matter promised a solid insight into British eating habits, delivered with Slater's trademark wit...
Published on 6 Nov 2007 by Nomesky


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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars You'd have to be a Nigel ..., 27 Nov 2008
By 
... to write this. Or a Jeremy. Or possibly a Terence. But maybe we all have anorak-y tendencies when it comes to name-checking the fondly remembered foods of our 1950s and 60s childhoods.
But sorry, Nigel - you've done this too many times before - and so have too many other people. Spangles, Dairylea triangles, Jammie Dodgers, Tunnock's teacakes have had the Proustian treatment before. And let's face it though Spangles now RIP, nearly all of these along with Sarson's vinegar and Bisto can be bought in any Tesco today. Though I agree that floral gums (and cherry lips, the best for eating surreptitiously through double Latin) have had the chemistry formula changed and don't taste the same.
When Nigel gets stuck, or his Proustian madeleine/Rich Tea disintegrates soggily into his mug of PG, he throws in a page or two about farmers' markets - and then he simply gets BORING.
Eating for England is simply Toast reheated. And Nigel is getting to be an old aunt who retells the same stories too many times. (He's getting careless, too; the delectable lime barrel was never in Dairy Box, p166, it was everybody's favourite centre in Milk Tray. And Dairy Box wasn't made by Cadbury's, either. )
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars NO CREDIT TO NIGEL SLATER, 16 Dec 2010
This review is from: Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table (Paperback)
This book contains lots of good nuggets as one would expect of Nigel Slater, but the editor should be sacked. There is so much repetition that the book should be about two thirds of its length so it appears to be padded out to justify the cost.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars YOU KNOW IT WILL NEVER BE LESS THAN THE BEST FROM NIGEL, 17 July 2010
By 
Mrs. Kerima Smethers (London, U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table (Paperback)
Nigel Slater is such a class act, both in his writing and in his cookery. I actually chanced upon him not long ago and it was a wonderful"Eureka" moment, if I have got the right turn of phrase!! I now look out eagerly for his programmes and his writings.

This book is an absolute joy - the subject of each chapter he sees through an item of food and each is thereby given his unique touch. At times nostalgic, at others really funny and at times a sadness, hard to put into words that reminds me of his wonderful and achingly bittersweet autobiography "Toast". Quoting from the Sunday Times comment on the sleeve of the book. - Nigel truly is "A National Treasure"

If you know Nigel Slater's writing already, this is certainly another jewel in the crown, If not I urge you to buy it - it will be a real treat in store, I promise you.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pick n' Mix, 1 Dec 2008
"Eating for England" is a Pick n' Mix of a book. Read it all in one go and it gets repetitive and downright indigestible. But there are a few sweet and well-written little pieces within that make the book worthwhile. I would not really recommend this to anyone under 30 or over 65: and if you are the sort of person who is quickly bored by 40-somethings reminiscing about BBC children's programs of the 1960s or long-vanished crisp flavours, then you should give it a miss, too.

Where Nigel Slater's book rises above the standard nostalgia-trip, it does so because he can write well on occasions and his genuine love of food comes through. But there were far too many instances when a well-written piece was followed by yet another push for Farmers' Markets or another dive into the 1960s biscuit tin which all got a bit too much even for this nostalgia fan.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I feel I've read it all before, 25 Jan 2008
By 
Mr. R. F. W. Freeman "Freddy" (Buckinghamshire) - See all my reviews
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Nigel Slater is my favourite cookery writer, but this was a disappointment. I loved Toast but this book seems to be made up of its leftovers. There doesn't seem to be anything new in it - I feel I've read it all before. Toast was a much more personal reminiscence and was both funny and sad in places, but I really can't be bothered to finish this one. And I really do love Nigel Slater.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars farmer's market propaganda, 9 Oct 2008
By 
B. S. HARPER "book maggot" (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table (Paperback)
I must say there were many times where I laughed out loud or smiled in relation to many things I do or eat and how they are quintessentially British. I also learned that I AM the 'oh-i-never-measure-anything cook.' The experience of reading this lovely book, however has been marred by every other page judging people for not going to local greengrocers and not supporting farmer's markets.

I may be lucky enough to afford (or just a good budgeter!) to eat organic/local/fairtrade and have time to shop 3 times a week instead of one big one (I'm a student) but I know of too many people who simply don't have the time, energy OR money to buy ethically all the time and they shouldn't be made to feel bad for this. I want Nigel, Hugh AND Jamie (3 men I love very much) to spend a week in a council estate with a family of 5 and see how much money they have to spend on their groceries!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 2 July 2014
This review is from: Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table (Paperback)
Great condition
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 17 April 2014
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This review is from: Eating for England: The Delights and Eccentricities of the British at Table (Paperback)
Eccentric, eclectic collection and reminiscences on the joys of the British table. Opinionated and a good read. Tuck yourself with a little drinkers and ponder your next meal.
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5.0 out of 5 stars eating for england, 23 Mar 2014
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I found it very entertaining. It was also quite funny in some of the story. The only problem I had was the time it took to wait for the delivery.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Cut and come again cake, 25 Feb 2014
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I really enjoyed "Toast" the book and the TV drama. I also enjoyed Nigel's recent TV programmes about biscuits and sweets. I love his style of writing, rather tongue in cheek (or is that a lemon sherbet?), and the nostalgia I share with him, being roughly the same age.

Unfortunately this book is very repetitive, and I am surprised it has not been recently re edited. There were several similar chapters on farmers markets and afternoon tea, which became quite annoying, and he seems to have an obsession with pink wafers and lemon puffs!!

Sadly there is no mention of the Florida orange juice that used to come frozen in tins, chocolatey Kunzel cakes, Birds Eye chicken pie or the ubiquitous tinned salmon, beloved of Sunday teatime, and does anyone remember Lord Toffingham ice creams - soft toffee surrounded by ice cream and chocolate on a stick.

Worth reading, one to put down and pick up again because it is written in short, memory provoking chapters - but be prepared to skip some very repetitive slices.
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