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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If only history was taught like this in school...
James Holland's generosity of spirit and indefatiguable labour has created one of the best general histories I've read recently--and there's a lot of stiff competition about. As well as using written sources, Holland personally interviewed survivors from all sides of the conflict; Germans, Poles, Canadians, Britons, Americans, Italian partisans and fascists. These...
Published on 3 May 2008 by T. Burkard

versus
9 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Badly edited
Irritatingly badly editted (don't historians have editors these days?), so much so that I found it hard to believe that it can have been properly researched.

A female guerrilla carries four "mortars" in a shopping bag; a unit gets "within site" (sic) of its objective; terms are non-standard, to say the least - we get "bazooka gunners" and the Nebelwerfer...
Published on 6 Dec 2010 by T. Walton


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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If only history was taught like this in school..., 3 May 2008
By 
T. Burkard (Norwich, England) - See all my reviews
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James Holland's generosity of spirit and indefatiguable labour has created one of the best general histories I've read recently--and there's a lot of stiff competition about. As well as using written sources, Holland personally interviewed survivors from all sides of the conflict; Germans, Poles, Canadians, Britons, Americans, Italian partisans and fascists. These accounts give a vivid picture of the heroism and brutality of war, and instil a sense of sympathy for (almost) all of the participants. Their stories are skillfully blended into the larger narrative, which explains what happened, and why the major players (Alexander, Mark Clark, Kesselring, Churchill, Roosevelt, Mussolini, etc) made crucial decisions. Holland is immenently fair-minded; the controversy surrounding Clark's dash for Rome (in defiance of Alexander's orders) is explained from all sides of the question.

Comparing this book with the banal materials presented in England's National Curriculum, one could almost be forgiven for thinking that our educators don't want our children to understand the past. If books like these--which don't require a vast amount of background knowledge--were used in our high schools, pupils would be queuing up to study history. For all that this is accessible to the non-specialist, there's nothing superficial about it. Certainly one of its most attractive features is the sympathy Holland shows to his cast of characters--a welcome relief from the sneering debunking that has been fashionable ever since Lytton Strachey first picked up his pen.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A definitive history, 27 Oct 2009
By 
Chris Holehouse "Chris Holehouse" (Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45 (Paperback)
The Italian campaign of 1944 to 1945 is probably the most overlooked of all the major WW2 theatres of war. James Holland has written the definitive account of these events and no serious WW2 historian should miss this book. Packed with gripping narrative, moving personal accounts and many little known facts and figures you will not want to put this book down. I think it's lasting effect on me will be more than simply filling a massive gap in my WW2 knowledge - it has made me want to find out more. Already I have found existing writing on this campaign to lack the drama and sheer fascination generated by this book. It also provides a vital perspective on post-war Italian political and economic history. I have no hesitation in recommending this book - it will move and educate in equal measure and will leave you thinking as I did that probably no other area of WW2 was more bloody, more cruel and more savage. Lest we forget? - I suggest history has already forgotten all those who fought (or were caught up) in these events. James Holland has provided a fitting epitaph to the fallen, and a great memorial to the survivors. Read it now!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Italy's sorrow, 8 May 2010
A superb book, beautifully written, I have nothing to add to the other five-star reviews other than to agree with them. I'm glad Holland is young and we can look forward to much more from him - he possesses a very rare gift of clarity and human understanding; he cares about the people he is writing about, and his well-reasoned conclusions on areas of dispute are always valuable. (Mark Clark's lunge for Rome particularly). My only gripe is the horrible quality of the book's production - sure, the design and typesetting are fine, but oh how I wished for a properly sewn copy as I prised mine open, having to keep pressure on it all the time as I read so that a good read was timed by the ache in my thumbs, with the plates popping out as the wretched 'perfect binding' gave way. Holland's superb narrative deserved a far better fate. I would happily have paid much, much more for a sewn edition. I would like Amazon to list three types of book, not just hardback and paperback - you know the latter is going to be 'perfect bound' and forgivably so for economy, but to list instead 'paperback', 'sewn and cased', and ''perfect bound' cased'. In fact I'd prefer another term for the third, like 'trash-glued in case' - you really do need a vice to prise open this horror, and the book is so good in every other respect.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Italy at war, 8 Oct 2010
By 
P. J. Connolly "Caractacus" (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This is simply a great book. The author has focused on the last year of the Second World War in Italy. In a panoramic review of the events, the strategy, tactics, combatants and non combatants alike the author has painted a compelling picture of this period. Each aspect is handled with authority, compassion and understanding but the real talent is to have threaded it all together so that it makes sense. It was a grim and brutal struggle over unforgiving terrain, one month mountains, the next rivers. Apart from episodes such as the Anzio Landing or the capture of Rome it received comparatively little fanfare at home. Yet both sides employed huge resources but the allies could not achieve a decisive breakthrough until the war was almost over. The author uses the personal memories of people from all nationalities and backgrounds to convey just what it was like to be on the front line or in occupied territory. He conveys very well that, as in France and other countries, not only was this a struggle between countries but it was also a civil war with all the horrors that entails. This is a very readable book which I would commend anyone to buy.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent history of a oft-forgotten conflict, 9 Sep 2010
By 
John Middleton (Brisbane, QLD, AUST) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45 (Paperback)
Italy's Sorrow is the story of the often forgotten Italian campaign in WWII. Despite Soviet calls for a "second front" from 1942, somehow the 1943 invasion of Sicily, and subsequent slog up the Italian peninsula, did not even count as a second front in WWII, despite tying up a large number of German troops, especially after the Italian surrender, and then subsequently switching sides to fight alongside the Allies.

Nonetheless, the war in Italy was an important part of WWII, and James Holland tells the story well. All sides of the conflict are covered off - the Allied forces, including Free French and Polish troops as well as the GI's and Brits, and the German defenders under Kesselring, with the Italian people caught in the middle, whether as partisans, auxliaries to one side or other, or civilians.

The campaign is analysed from a military standpoint, but the impact on Italy itself is never overlooked. In Masters and Commanders and The Storm of War Andrew Roberts questioned the value of the Italian front after the capture of Rome, but Holland never considers the question - it is clear that to leave simply half of Italy in German hands and settle into defensive positions was not an option for democracies who claimed to be fighting for freedom. German atrocities against Italians are detailed, and the impact of the Allies was at times scarcely less brutal, especially the French colonial Goums.

When reading about D-Day and the second battle of France, the impact on civilian life - the collateral damage, in today's terms - is made clear. What is also clear after reading Italy's Sorrow is that Italy suffered far worse - perhaps rightly, as a former Nazi ally - and that this suffering can largely be laid at the feet of Il Duce Mussolini himself. A case could probably be made that Nazi Germany might have been better off with Italy remaning a friendly neutral in WWII, trading with Germany but not co-belligerant with it. With no North Africa and Greece to ensnare German troops to rescue Italian adventurism, the Eastern push might have been quite different in 1941-42. Certainly Italy would have been better off without entry into WWII, which ended with much of the country in ruins and a population starved and shell shocked by war.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another tour de force, 30 April 2008
By 
John Richard "camban99" (Hull, UK) - See all my reviews
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This comparatively ignored part of WW2 occurred at around the same time as the Normandy landings but was every bit as ferocious, if not more so. Huge tracts of Italy were laid bare by the clashing armies, one of the most poignant photographic representations I have ever seen shows the lovely little town of Monte Cassino before and after the whirlwind of war had passed by; there was absolutely nothing left. As always with this superb author, we learn the tragedy of the civilians caught up in the catastrophic destruction, the confused politics, and the relentless slog of both the generals and the soldiers on each side. Amazing to discover that there seventeen different nations involved on the allied side including such diverse cultures as the Brazilians, Maoris, and Moroccan tribesmen. The latter though managed to disgrace themselves through extreme rape and pillage, adding to the continuing misery of the innocents, and they were never brought to justice, unlike the Germans who did commit many atrocities but not at the same level of depravity. Another beautifully written and complete piece of work.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended Book on Italian Campaign 1944-45, 30 April 2012
By 
David I. Walker (Galashiels) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45 (Paperback)
This is a very amazingly comprehensive and often very moving book.
In fact, the year with which he is concerned runs from the breakout at Cassino, known as Operation Diadem, on 11-12 May 1944 to the ceasefire of 2 May 1945, leading up to VE Day on 8 May. The plight of Italian civilians and the horrors they endured are set within military and political contexts, each meticulously described. Then there are the partisans, immensely brave but at times vicious, essential to the Allied advance but in the process causing not only horrific reprisals on families and supporters by exasperated Germans but, in their battles with Fascist militias, a bloody civil war.

Holland's research is quite staggering. His aim has been to illuminate the story with personal reminiscences and details of the backgrounds of his main characters, high and low, from army commanders to contadini. Recorded interviews with German soldiers make this book stand out among the many histories of the war in Italy, especially the interview with Hans Golda of the 71 Werfer Regiment, who is evidently rather a jolly person but gives vivid accounts of times in extremis, such as the horror of seeing comrades drowning as they tried to escape across the Po. Woven into the narrative are quotations from Norman Lewis, Martha Gellhorn and the brilliant American reporter Eric Sevareid; and there is a retelling of Iris Origo's escape with a troop of children, which she described in her classic War in the Val d'Orcia. Then there is Carla Capponi, a member of the Resistance in Rome. In his prologue, Holland describes the part she took in the blowing up of a German platoon that resulted in the notorious massacre at the Ardeatine Caves, in which 335 Italians were shot - ten for every German killed, plus five extras. In later life she was agonisingly aware that reprisals, in Holland's words, 'signalled the start of a policy that was to cast a terrible shadow over Italy and which would fan the flames of a bloodbath that would last beyond the end of the war'.

Alexander, Mark Clark, Leese, Anders, Kesselring, von Senger und Ebberlin and the 'smooth-talking charmer' Wolff, overseer of the anti-partisan war, come under Holland's scrutiny.

Historians, British and American, not to mention veterans, will be curious to know what he says about Mark Clark's anti-British paranoia and what he calls the 'Big Switch', when Clark contravened Alexander's order in his determination to get to Rome first instead of blocking the escape route of the Germans retreating from Cassino. Holland recognises Clark's brashness and vanity, which repelled so many, but portrays him overall as a battlefield commander with an ability to 'see the bigger strategic overview'.

Many months later, the Gothic Line having been breached and battles having been fought which Holland describes in chapters aptly headed 'Mountain Passes and Bloody Ridges' and 'Rain, Mud and Misery', relations between Alexander and Clark had perforce improved and there were changes in overall command. Alexander was promoted to Supreme Allied Commander in the Mediterranean and was happy to recommend Clark as Commander in Italy in his place.

By the end of May, partisan bands were vastly growing in numbers, particularly in the Apennines, and they were aided by arms drops from the Allies. Prominent among them was the Stella Rossa, headed by a shadowy figure known as Lupo, who operated in the Monte Sole massif and was much feared by the Germans. One German is quoted as saying that operations against partisans seemed like suicide missions. Lupo's men were also merciless towards known and suspected Fascists. There are some appalling stories of atrocities on both sides. As Holland says, some German commanders felt enabled to act with unrestrained brutality, executing scores of men, women and children at Gubbio and also in Tuscany 'to stop the rot'. All this is described with considerable feeling. North of Lucca, in the Apuan hills, the village of Sant'Anna was regarded by the Germans as a centre of partisan activity. The 35th Panzer Grenadiers moved in, burned down sheds and houses, and killed 560 people of all ages.

More followed. A major operation had been planned by the Germans to eliminate the Stella Rossa (believed to be two thousand strong) and all its supporters in villages and farms on Monte Sole. The date was fixed for 29 September, and this time the 'clearance' would be by the 16th Waffen SS. Holland has some first-hand stories from two survivors, Cornelia Paselli and Francesco Pirini. Cornelia and her family were herded into a small walled cemetery and machine-gunned - she survived by lying under a heap of bodies; altogether 191 died, all women and children. Francesco, aged seventeen, had been trying to connect with partisans, and from nearby woods had seen nine members of his family and others driven into the church where they were shot. Over three days 772 people were killed on Monte Sole and their houses burned. What was it that turned the likes of Hans Golda (who was not involved) into cold-blooded monsters?

Meanwhile in the north there were other massacres, possibly more than 700 of them, by Germans and Fascists - the 'Black Brigades' and the bloodthirsty 'Decima Mas' headed by Prince Valerio Borghese - in revenge for partisans' activities, including sabotage (in which members of the SOE No 1 Special Force played a part).
After the war Fascists were hunted down and killed - Holland says 15,000, though it was possibly more.

Another first-hand account, unconnected with partisans, is that of Pasua Pisa. She lived in a farm high in the Ausoni Mountains, which lie between Anzio and Cassino and had been captured in a spectacular manner by French Moroccan troops, known as Goums. Pasua's husband was a prisoner of war in Canada, and her father and small son were killed by a mortar shell the boy had found. When the Goums arrived she was dragged outside and violently raped. This was the beginning of a 'frenzied spree' not only of rape, but murder and pillage: 'They flung themselves on us like unleashed demons.' Official figures record 3,100 rapes, some of males, but there were people who never came forward out of shame. A French officer explained that Goumiers were recruited 'by way of a pact which granted them the right to sack and pillage'. There were never any prosecutions.

Italy's sorrow also included the loss of and severe damage to famous buildings.
Holland mentions the destruction of Benevento's cathedral and describes how Rimini became 'a shell of a city'.

This book covers the rarely described GOTHIC LINE campaign to cross the Appennines to Bologna and the Po Valley ,
plus the LAST OFFENSIVE of early April 1945 , which finally finished the war after the British and Poles crossing the River Senio in the East , and the American army breaking through the last few mountains , before capturing Bologna in the Centre.

This is a very-well written book
( and is one of the very, very few written about the Last Year of Fighting in Italy ,
May 1944 to April 1945 )

If you want a detailed book , that ONLY covers the bitter fighting for the Gothic Line from August to October 1944
then purchase the out-of-print ' THE GOTHIC LINE ' by Douglas Orgill ( Pan Books 1967 Edition )
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book but this campaign is still waiting for the definative work, 29 April 2011
By 
N. Brown (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45 (Paperback)
I'd not read any other works by James Holland before this one, but given the outstanding review for this and his earlier work on the North African campaign (Together We Stand) I was expecting something exceptional. Whilst there is no doubt that the author has a gift for weaving together a very wide of anecdotes into a coherent narrative I must confess to being left a little underwhelmed.

The book reminded me very much of Max Hastings's two works on the last years of WW2, Armageddon and Nemesis. The strength's of those books are in the compelling nature of the eye-witness accounts and the same is true here. Tom Holland has discovered an ensemble of participants who bear testimony to the true horrors of war and its impact on ordinary people. Here the generals and the politicians take backstage although they are still import players in the story.

The book kicks-off with the start of the fourth Battle of Cassino (Operation Diadem) in May 1944. The early parts of the Italian campaign are very covered in other sources however most tend to stop after the fall of Rome on 5th June 1944. The second half of the war in Italy is one of those forgotten campaigns that grab my interest. I was hoping for some hardnosed analysis of this campaign but was left disappointed on this count.

I agree with one of the earlier reviews that the work suffers from some sloppy editing and several factually inaccurate descriptions of equipment. What did surprise me is that the author was prepared to let the two principle allied commanders, Alexander and Clark, off the hook with little counter-argument to the many other authors who have found them seriously wanting (Carlo D'Este to name but one).

Overall I'd recommend this work but I feel the serious military historians will feel a little short-changed
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Italy's Sorrow - a sad tale, 13 April 2011
By 
P. Howard "Penny Howard" (Florence Italy) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45 (Paperback)
Poor Italians - we have depicted them as wanting some easy pickings from sharing Germany's success at the beginning of WW2 - and no doubt there was some truth in that - but they were led into a war they didn't want - as one of my Italian friends put it "Italians prefer eating and making love to fighting" - well fair do'es to that! Having decided that they wanted to get out of fighting with Germany they failed to realise that the Germans would retrench and Italy itself would become the theatre of war against Germany - and how they suffered under the hands of their new Allies - Lampedusa and Monte Cassino in particular.
This is a brilliant history book because it contains useful maps and photos but mainly because it uses first hand accounts of people's feelings and the things they had to do to survive the terrible revenge wreaked upon Italy for changing sides whilst their "friends and allies" bombarded them to pulp as they tried to recover the "soft underbelly"!
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Italy's Sorrow, Excellent, 16 Jun 2009
By 
M. Frankel - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45 (Paperback)
An outstanding book covering both Allied and Axis story from a soldiers point of view. It describes, often from first hand experiences the real horror of State on State war and the cruelty that humans can inflict on each other regardless of which side they were on.
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Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45
Italy's Sorrow: A Year of War 1944-45 by James Holland (Paperback - 28 May 2009)
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