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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on 16 October 2000
I was read this as a child, and it's my favourite children's book. Apart from being unbelievably imaginative, funny, and, of course, beautifully drawn, it also teaches an invaluable lesson to the reader. it follows a little chap on a phenomenally difficult journey to Solla Sollew, 'on the banks of the beautiful river Wah-Hoo, where they never have troubles, at least, very few'. He's trying to get away from Troubles (with a capital T) and beleives that Solla Sollew will be the answer. In true Dr Seuss style, the journey is amazing and gloriously complicated. My favourite line of all is when he finds himself manipulated into pulling a camel and its owner up a difficult hill by a rope. The owner chap says "this is called teamwork. I furnish the brains. you furnish the muscles, the aches and the pains". How many bosses around the world do we know like this? I won't spoil the ending,but the lesson is: turn around and face your problems. Don't think that by running away from them, they'll go away. perhaps a bit much for a little person to take on board, but who said Dr Seuss is only for children? A brilliant book.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 10 October 2001
A brillant book! Without being too deep,it teaches kids a valuable lesson in a fun and fast-paced way. This would also be a great book to give someone going through a rough patch as it holds at it's centre a message for us all, no matter what age we are.
Also, while you're buying this; buy 'Oh, the places you'll go'. You won't regret it!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
This book is great for the child who is never satisfied, or is too easily discouraged.
The story opens with a happy, carefree young furry creature with a tail in the Valley of Vung starting to have problems because he gets careless and doesn't look around. Discouraged by these setbacks, he is all ears when a chap on a One-Wheeler Wubble comes along and says that there's never any trouble in the City of Solla Sollew, and offers take him there. The trip turns out to be very arduous and difficult. Finally at Solla Sollew, a new problem arises. From this experience, he decides to be more proactive in the future. "Now my troubles are going, To have trouble with me!"
Like all of the Dr. Seuss books, this one is enlivened by hilarious creatures, dramatic and colorful illustrations, and a pleasant rhyming scheme that uses funny names to aid the rhymes.
One of the most difficult lessons for people to learn is that we carry the seeds of all our problems and opportunities around with us. Simply changing the scenery may not be enough, if our old ways of thinking still guide us. If you are somewhat depressed and see no opportunity in one place, even in an earthly paradise you can still experience life the same way.
Many people go through life looking for the perfect mate, house, and job, only to be constantly disappointed. In I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, that voyage toward perfection can be quickly experienced and the lesson learned. Here is where a parent can make a big difference. You need to share some experiences in your own life where you lived this story, and share what you learned as a result. In this way, you can help you child in later years by providing an alternative perspective and reminding her or him or this story. "Are you going to Solla Sollew?" can be a shorthand way of encouraging your child to re-examine the purpose of the sought-for change.
For an adult, the benefit from this story can be to help you consider whether all of the error-elimination you pursue is worth the effort. My clients frequently are interested in reducing their error rate. They may be starting, though, in an area with an error rate that is only one in ten million occurrences. And the area being considered may be relatively unimportant to the success of the organization. The same effort could instead make important improvements in some area where mistakes abound, results do matter, and perfection is an impossible dream.
Decide what the problem is before you grab just any solution!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
I bought this book because I wanted to base a painting on something from it. Possibly paint the scenery as I always find it very surreal.

This is a great book for kids, which may lead them to develop colourful imaginations, and aid them in learning at the same time. Something I noticed about the book (which I obviously didn't notice at a young age) was that Dr. Seuss had included a portrayal of the proletariat and bourgeosie (sp?). The example was when the man was making the little boy carry everything. And saying because he was older and wiser he knew more. Hmm, I can't quite remember it exactly, but read it for yourself. I thought I was being paranoid seeing this political stance in this particular book, but when I had a look online I apparantly wasn't wrong.

Great book! Fantastic images!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This book is great for the child who is never satisfied, or is too easily discouraged.
The story opens with a happy, carefree young furry creature with a tail in the Valley of Vung starting to have problems because he gets careless and doesn't look around. Discouraged by these setbacks, he is all ears when a chap on a One-Wheeler Wubble comes along and says that there's never any trouble in the City of Solla Sollew, and offers take him there. The trip turns out to be very arduous and difficult. Finally at Solla Sollew, a new problem arises. From this experience, he decides to be more proactive in the future. "Now my troubles are going, To have trouble with me!"
Like all of the Dr. Seuss books, this one is enlivened by hilarious creatures, dramatic and colorful illustrations, and a pleasant rhyming scheme that uses funny names to aid the rhymes.
One of the most difficult lessons for people to learn is that we carry the seeds of all our problems and opportunities around with us. Simply changing the scenery may not be enough, if our old ways of thinking still guide us. If you are somewhat depressed and see no opportunity in one place, even in an earthly paradise you can still experience life the same way.
Many people go through life looking for the perfect mate, house, and job, only to be constantly disappointed. In I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, that voyage toward perfection can be quickly experienced and the lesson learned. Here is where a parent can make a big difference. You need to share some experiences in your own life where you lived this story, and share what you learned as a result. In this way, you can help you child in later years by providing an alternative perspective and reminding her or him or this story. "Are you going to Solla Sollew?" can be a shorthand way of encouraging your child to re-examine the purpose of the sought-for change.
For an adult, the benefit from this story can be to help you consider whether all of the error-elimination you pursue is worth the effort. My clients frequently are interested in reducing their error rate. They may be starting, though, in an area with an error rate that is only one in ten million occurrences. And the area being considered may be relatively unimportant to the success of the organization. The same effort could instead make important improvements in some area where mistakes abound, results do matter, and perfection is an impossible dream.
Decide what the problem is before you grab just any solution!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 2 December 2009
A fantastic book from my childhood. An excellent book if you like Dr Seuss books or not. Its about a little creature who has a few troubles (don't we all!) but he decides to try to run away from them and leave it all behind so he goes in search of a better life only to discover there are more bigger problems ahead of him. There is a nice ending where he realises he needs to face up to his origional troubles and deal with them first.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 August 2013
he narrator of the story and lead character is a small furry bear like creature, who leads a happy go lucky existence in the Valley of Vung.
This all changes when he is attacked by a host of rather nasty creatures - a very fresh Green Headed Quiligan Quail, a Skritz and a Skrink.
Naturally when a chap on a one-wheel wubble offers him a trip to the promised utopia of Solla Sollew `where they have no troubles, at least very few.'
Unfortunately the journey to Solla Sollew is fraught with difficulties and dangers, and when our friend reaches Solla Sollew, he discovers that the one little problem that Solla Sollew has, makes the city inaccessible.

Eventually he comes to the realization that problems need to be faced and can not be run away from.We need to re-examine our thought patterns. A great motivational book, for both children and adults. It was one of my childhood favourites. Dr Seuss' books always bring back great memories
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This book is great for the child who is never satisfied, or is too easily discouraged.
The story opens with a happy, carefree young furry creature with a tail in the Valley of Vung starting to have problems because he gets careless and doesn't look around. Discouraged by these setbacks, he is all ears when a chap on a One-Wheeler Wubble comes along and says that there's never any trouble in the City of Solla Sollew, and offers take him there. The trip turns out to be very arduous and difficult. Finally at Solla Sollew, a new problem arises. From this experience, he decides to be more proactive in the future. "Now my troubles are going, To have trouble with me!"
Like all of the Dr. Seuss books, this one is enlivened by hilarious creatures, dramatic and colorful illustrations, and a pleasant rhyming scheme that uses funny names to aid the rhymes.
One of the most difficult lessons for people to learn is that we carry the seeds of all our problems and opportunities around with us. Simply changing the scenery may not be enough, if our old ways of thinking still guide us. If you are somewhat depressed and see no opportunity in one place, even in an earthly paradise you can still experience life the same way.
Many people go through life looking for the perfect mate, house, and job, only to be constantly disappointed. In I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew, that voyage toward perfection can be quickly experienced and the lesson learned. Here is where a parent can make a big difference. You need to share some experiences in your own life where you lived this story, and share what you learned as a result. In this way, you can help you child in later years by providing an alternative perspective and reminding her or him or this story. "Are you going to Solla Sollew?" can be a shorthand way of encouraging your child to re-examine the purpose of the sought-for change.
For an adult, the benefit from this story can be to help you consider whether all of the error-elimination you pursue is worth the effort. My clients frequently are interested in reducing their error rate. They may be starting, though, in an area with an error rate that is only one in ten million occurrences. And the area being considered may be relatively unimportant to the success of the organization. The same effort could instead make important improvements in some area where mistakes abound, results do matter, and perfection is an impossible dream.
Decide what the problem is before you grab just any solution!
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on 28 January 2012
This book is amazing and without a doubt my favourite Dr Seuss book. It is a tale of a young character who is constantly running from his troubles in the hope of reaching a perfect place in which troubles can never bother him again. Of course this is impossible, and Dr Seuss shows in a witty and uplifting way that you cannot prevent hardship befalling you but it is always better to face your problems head on lest they get worse. This book captured my imagination as a child and still does as an adult, it almost makes me want to have children just so that I can read it to them! It is full of hilarious rhymes and beautiful illustrations (my favourite one is the one of him dreaming that he is sleeping on a bed of marshmallows in Solla Sollew) and it has a witty twist when it explains what the 'very few' troubles in Solla Sollew actually are. It is intended for a slightly (slightly) older audience that the cat in the hat for example, but could be read to a child of any age. To read this aloud you would need to set aside probably 20 minutes but it's well worth it. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 23 November 1998
Surely Dr. Seuss's masterpiece. Knocks "The Cat in the Hat" into, well, a cocked hat.
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