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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A cringeworthy fun frolic for kids of all ages!
This book makes you cringe, laugh and want to cry! The minxy Cat in the Hat decides to brighten up 2 bored children's day - with disasterous consequences. The hilarious rhyming escapades roll off the tongue so easily when reading to a child that they soon pick up the next lines themselves. I have been reading this to kids for years and I still love it as much as they do...
Published on 30 Oct 2001 by chantelle.house@virgin.net

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Not applicable
The book didn't arrive. I think it must have got lost in the post.
Published 6 days ago by Lizzie


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Like This Book. I Like It A Lot., 4 Mar 2004
This review is from: The Cat in the Hat: Green Back Book (Dr Seuss - Green Back Book) (Paperback)
This is a timeless children's classic, and it certainly encouraged me to start reading when I was a young child (30 years ago). I recall my dad reading it to me, reading the rhymes faster and faster whilst I gazed over his shoulder at the mad illustrations.
Now I have my own young children, I've book a selection of Dr Seuss books, and this one has to be our collective favourite. It has an amusing story, great illustrations, and some tongue-twisting rhymes. My son never fails to giggle when the fish lands in the pot. Does the fish like that? No, he does not.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the phylosophy of dr suess, 26 Jan 2002
By A Customer
Dr Suess is a talented and creative writer with favourites for the young and old to colect and injoy.His classic cat in the hat has also got a sequel called the cat in the hat returns which has a fabulous ryming tale to enjoy.Another favourite from Dr Suess is green eggs and ham a delightful tale of refusal and cheerfulness for again in my opinion for all ages if you havent heard of Dr Suess where have you been all of your life probably not in the poetry or all round Dr Suess shelfs of a good stocked book store thats for sure.In my opinion for alll ages even teens like myself Dr Suess reeks of awesomenes and green eggs and ham.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Opening the Doorway for a Child's Imagination, 9 Sep 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Researchers constantly find that reading to children is valuable in a variety of ways, not least of which are instilling a love of reading and improved reading skills. With better parent-child bonding from reading, your child will also be more emotionally secure and able to relate better to others. Intellectual performance will expand as well. Spending time together watching television fails as a substitute.
To help other parents apply this advice, as a parent of four I consulted an expert, our youngest child, and asked her to share with me her favorite books that were read to her as a young child. The Cat in the Hat was one of her picks.
I have always thought of this book as a metaphor for the sort of "make believe" thinking that children like to do and are good at. The setting is a cold rainy day, and the children's mother isn't home. I have always transformed that into they are playing in their room while their mother is busy elsewhere in the house. Suddenly, a mysterious cat arrives who can do remarkable jugging (until he drops everything) and brings in a fun box (with two little creatures who fly kites). A parental voice, however, is always present in the form of the children's fish who constantly warns them to get rid of the cat in the hat.
Suddenly, the mother is spotted about to reenter the house. The children are panic-stricken. The house is a mess! What to do? They are obviously about to be really in for it. I can feel the adrenaline rushing even now as I remember similar situations with friends as a child.
But then, the cat in the hat returns with a miraculous device which cleans everything up! And then he is gone, just as their mother steps in. She asks, "Did you have any fun? Tell me. What did you do?" The two children don't know what to say. They ask you what you would do if your mother asked you.
The ending is wonderful because it sets up a wonderful opportunity to talk about the story. Would the child let in the cat in the hat? Would the child ask the cat in the hat to leave and when? Was the fish correct in warning the children? What are the other reasons not to let strangers in? Why should you tell your mother if things go awry, or not? In the course of the discussion, fears that the story probably raises can be dealt with in a constructive way that reduces fear in the future and improves communication in the family. Most children have these kinds of fears, but aren't usually willing to bring them up. So the book gives you the excuse to work on improving their security.
This is one of the more difficult Dr. Seuss books for beginning readers, so you'll be reading this one to your child for a while. The appeal to the child is very much in the idea of playing unrestrained in the house. Almost no child is allowed to do that, and the consequences are pretty funny for the child if they are happening to someone else.
If you want to see the earliest versions of the cat in the hat character, be sure to see Dr. Seuss Goes to War which documents his work as a political cartoonist in World War II.
Then, encourage your child to use the book to come up with her or his own ideas about fun things to do as make-believe on a rainy day. Can they imagine a more fun make-believe visitor than the cat in the hat? What would the visitor do? If you ask these questions, you will extend your child's imagination now and for a lifetime.
Enjoy for the rest of your life!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Opening the Doorway for a Child's Imagination, 8 Sep 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Researchers constantly find that reading to children is valuable in a variety of ways, not least of which are instilling a love of reading and improved reading skills. With better parent-child bonding from reading, your child will also be more emotionally secure and able to relate better to others. Intellectual performance will expand as well. Spending time together watching television fails as a substitute.
To help other parents apply this advice, as a parent of four I consulted an expert, our youngest child, and asked her to share with me her favorite books that were read to her as a young child. The Cat in the Hat was one of her picks.
I have always thought of this book as a metaphor for the sort of "make believe" thinking that children like to do and are good at. The setting is a cold rainy day, and the children's mother isn't home. I have always transformed that into they are playing in their room while their mother is busy elsewhere in the house. Suddenly, a mysterious cat arrives who can do remarkable jugging (until he drops everything) and brings in a fun box (with two little creatures who fly kites). A parental voice, however, is always present in the form of the children's fish who constantly warns them to get rid of the cat in the hat.
Suddenly, the mother is spotted about to reenter the house. The children are panic-stricken. The house is a mess! What to do? They are obviously about to be really in for it. I can feel the adrenaline rushing even now as I remember similar situations with friends as a child.
But then, the cat in the hat returns with a miraculous device which cleans everything up! And then he is gone, just as their mother steps in. She asks, "Did you have any fun? Tell me. What did you do?" The two children don't know what to say. They ask you what you would do if your mother asked you.
The ending is wonderful because it sets up a wonderful opportunity to talk about the story. Would the child let in the cat in the hat? Would the child ask the cat in the hat to leave and when? Was the fish correct in warning the children? What are the other reasons not to let strangers in? Why should you tell your mother if things go awry, or not? In the course of the discussion, fears that the story probably raises can be dealt with in a constructive way that reduces fear in the future and improves communication in the family. Most children have these kinds of fears, but aren't usually willing to bring them up. So the book gives you the excuse to work on improving their security.
This is one of the more difficult Dr. Seuss books for beginning readers, so you'll be reading this one to your child for a while. The appeal to the child is very much in the idea of playing unrestrained in the house. Almost no child is allowed to do that, and the consequences are pretty funny for the child if they are happening to someone else.
If you want to see the earliest versions of the cat in the hat character, be sure to see Dr. Seuss Goes to War which documents his work as a political cartoonist in World War II.
Then, encourage your child to use the book to come up with her or his own ideas about fun things to do as make-believe on a rainy day. Can they imagine a more fun make-believe visitor than the cat in the hat? What would the visitor do? If you ask these questions, you will extend your child's imagination now and for a lifetime.
Enjoy for the rest of your life!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Opening the Doorway for a Child's Imagination, 8 Sep 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Researchers constantly find that reading to children is valuable in a variety of ways, not least of which are instilling a love of reading and improved reading skills. With better parent-child bonding from reading, your child will also be more emotionally secure and able to relate better to others. Intellectual performance will expand as well. Spending time together watching television fails as a substitute.
To help other parents apply this advice, as a parent of four I consulted an expert, our youngest child, and asked her to share with me her favorite books that were read to her as a young child. The Cat in the Hat was one of her picks.
I have always thought of this book as a metaphor for the sort of "make believe" thinking that children like to do and are good at. The setting is a cold rainy day, and the children's mother isn't home. I have always transformed that into they are playing in their room while their mother is busy elsewhere in the house. Suddenly, a mysterious cat arrives who can do remarkable jugging (until he drops everything) and brings in a fun box (with two little creatures who fly kites). A parental voice, however, is always present in the form of the children's fish who constantly warns them to get rid of the cat in the hat.
Suddenly, the mother is spotted about to reenter the house. The children are panic-stricken. The house is a mess! What to do? They are obviously about to be really in for it. I can feel the adrenaline rushing even now as I remember similar situations with friends as a child.
But then, the cat in the hat returns with a miraculous device which cleans everything up! And then he is gone, just as their mother steps in. She asks, "Did you have any fun? Tell me. What did you do?" The two children don't know what to say. They ask you what you would do if your mother asked you.
The ending is wonderful because it sets up a wonderful opportunity to talk about the story. Would the child let in the cat in the hat? Would the child ask the cat in the hat to leave and when? Was the fish correct in warning the children? What are the other reasons not to let strangers in? Why should you tell your mother if things go awry, or not? In the course of the discussion, fears that the story probably raises can be dealt with in a constructive way that reduces fear in the future and improves communication in the family. Most children have these kinds of fears, but aren't usually willing to bring them up. So the book gives you the excuse to work on improving their security.
This is one of the more difficult Dr. Seuss books for beginning readers, so you'll be reading this one to your child for a while. The appeal to the child is very much in the idea of playing unrestrained in the house. Almost no child is allowed to do that, and the consequences are pretty funny for the child if they are happening to someone else.
If you want to see the earliest versions of the cat in the hat character, be sure to see Dr. Seuss Goes to War which documents his work as a political cartoonist in World War II.
Then, encourage your child to use the book to come up with her or his own ideas about fun things to do as make-believe on a rainy day. Can they imagine a more fun make-believe visitor than the cat in the hat? What would the visitor do? If you ask these questions, you will extend your child's imagination now and for a lifetime.
Enjoy for the rest of your life!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Generates Interest and sense of achievement, 11 Jan 2010
By 
H. Davies-Carr "HDC" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cat in the Hat: Green Back Book (Dr Seuss - Green Back Book) (Paperback)
Our oldest son came home from School with this book and seemed to take great delight in working through it page by page reading it. That may not sound so surprising however it was one of the first times he could read a book page by page and get enjoyment out of actually reading a book for himself. No, the book does not make any sense, yes the rhymes are a little funny however it works. I am sure hundreds of people have written reviews on this book over the years and you can't really make a mistake with a book that brings so much enjoyment at an early age
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The cat in the hat is a really funny and entertaning book., 10 Oct 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Cat in the Hat (CD-ROM)
The cat in the hat is brilliant rhythming book. I first found out about the book when my brother was reading it. He said it was the best book he had ever read so I just had to read it. When I had finished reading it I thought it was really good it helped me and my brother read much better and I would recommend it to anyone from the ages 4-11.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cat and Chaos, 25 Sep 2004
By 
Joanna Daneman (USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Cat in the Hat: Green Back Book (Dr Seuss - Green Back Book) (Paperback)
The Cat in the Hat has no other name--symbolic of his role as Chaos. He comes to visit two children, the predictable (as in "orderly") Boy and Girl at home. Inexplicably, the parents have left these two underaged children at home with no babysitter and no good sense to refuse entry to a patently dangerous beast who has regrettable taste in headgear. This is significant; despite the fact Mom And Dad represent Order in the equation, they introduce Chaos into the system by abandoning their kids. From that small oversight, the rest of the chaotic events unfold with Greek-tragedy-like inevitability, though with an unpredictable outcome. How like the universe this is; the stars in their courses, but the weather is utter madness.
The Cat roams rampant through the suburban home, pretty much doing what you and I and these two kids would LOVE to do but wouldn't dare--everything Mom and Dad tell you "not to." In psychological terms, the Cat is fulfilling the deepest desires of the children--to be really, really BAD, but without any consequences whatsoever. It's alluring, giddy, intoxicating, and it's SCARY, too. Disorder, like a roller-coaster ride, runs frighteningly and ultimately, downhill.
Just before the authoritarian ORDER figures Mom-and-Dad reappear on the scene, the Cat uses an unlikely device to vacuum up the mess and restore all as it was--in essence, reversing entropy. This is accomplished effortlessly and with no visible source of power. Here is a golden opportunity to discuss the Second Law of Thermodynamics* with your kids. A good exercise would be to try to calculate the energy that would have been required to run such a device. Question: would the device the Cat uses to clean the mess be able to run off a car battery, or would it require, oh, say, a fast-breeder reactor the size of Yokahama? You do the math.
This endurable children's classic is essential to teaching the young about responsibility, temptation, thermodynamics and chaos theory. You can't begin too early.
___________
*The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that "in all energy exchanges, if no energy enters or leaves the system, the potential energy of the state will always be less than that of the initial state." This is also known as entropy--or disorder.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reading appeals to all ages including adults!!, 12 Jun 1999
By A Customer
The way Dr Seuss makes such a simple thing so amusing to read is brilliant. The rhyming factor is also very good as it encourages children to participate in reading the story even when they are too young to physically read. Since reading this book to my Son we have now both became big Dr Seuss fans.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless & priceless, 19 Jun 2010
This review is from: The Cat in the Hat: Green Back Book (Dr Seuss - Green Back Book) (Paperback)
I loved it when I was a kid, I still do, and our kids love it today.

They were entranced from page 1.

Totally unique, zany, delightful, lively and fun. There is nothing else like it.

It will stay with the kids forever and not be just a passing phase like Thomas The Tank Engine, Power Rangers, Noddy etc.

Oh, if you have seen the recent awful film, don't worry. The film has nothing to do with this book except for the title.
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