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In this brilliant book, Thatcher discusses the state of the world at the start of the 21st century and the way forward, drawing on her considerable experience and keen insights. Chapter One: cold war reflections, touches on many subjects from the information revolution to the victory of the West in the cold war. Chapter Two looks at the American achievement including the concept of a unipolar world, military preparedness, defence technologies and missile defence.
Chapter Three deals with Russia, the legacy of communism, the role of the IMF, the failed economic reforms, the country's relations with its former Soviet colonies and what remains of its military power. Part One of Chapter Four explains why Asia, with half of the world's population and a third of all dry land, matters so much. Part Two deals with the Tigers: Singapore, South Korea and Indonesia, whilst Part Three is devoted to Japan. The next chapter, Asian Giants, deals with China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) and India.
In Chapter Six, rogue states, religion and terrorism are discussed, with particular reference to North Korea, Islam, Iraq, Syria, Lybia and Iran. In Chapter Seven, Thatcher discusses human rights, genocide, the Yugoslavia and Rwanda criminal tribunals, the international criminal court and European court of human rights.
Chapter Eight investigates the Balkan wars whilst Chapter Nine is devoted to the European Union. Thatcher investigates the roots of the European idea, the European economic and social model, the pensions crisis, the common agricultural policy, the Euro currency as a means towards a superstate and the bureaucratic, anti-democratic nature of the EU.
Thatcher warns against the creeping loss of sovereignty to unaccountable EU bureaucrats who have only contempt for democracy. The next chapter looks at the current situation of the UK by investigating all the options of how her country might extricate itself from this mess. She advises Britain to stick to the Pound and to renegotiate the structure of the EU.
The last chapter strikes a devastating blow to the critics of capitalism by illustrating how well the free economies have been performing as opposed to the shackled economies of the remaining authoritarian regimes. She also dissects the absurdities of the global warming scare and discusses globalism and its enemies.
The postscript deals with accountability and the Magna Carta in a delightful description of Thatcher and her husband's visit to the memorial at Runnymede. She concludes the book with the observation that the political culture of the English-speaking peoples has given the world the ideas that power should be limited, force should not overrule justice plus the conviction that individuals have an absolute moral worth.
There are 20 full color potgraphs, 13 maps and 8 tables that enhances this highly readable and illuminating text. Bibliographic references are scattered throughout and the book concludes with a thorough index.
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on 19 January 2010
I bought this with some degree of trepidation although it does appear that history is on the verge of judging her as being, well, right about so much stuff. This book is her analysis of many aspects of the world. I found her bullet pointed conclusions to be a somewhat simplistic, but her arguments are sound. It is clear that she is both a phenominal intellect and complete pragamatist, dealing with the world as it is, not how she would like it to be. Its a great read if you like thinking. I found her constant knee bending to america to be slightly nauseating, but, as i said, she is a complete pragmatist and recognises american global dominance. Well worth the money, though i am pretty sure she wrote this to continue her dying influence...and who can blame her.
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on 11 July 2005
I would recommend ANYBODY to give this book a chance. Margaret Thatcher may not always have communicated in a way that was seen as 'trendy', 'cool', 'right-on' but if the reader actually READS and THINKS about her message it makes a great deal of sense.
This book is a tour de force. I wish I had read this a long time ago.
Margaret Thatcher was far more of a rebel than the left wing sheep who constantly tried to lampoon her.
It is tragic that so many people have been brainwashed to trust self interested bureaucrats and socialists with their lives. God bless Margaret Thatcher for trying to wake a few people up.
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on 11 May 2003
Margaret Thatcher has been out of Number 10 Downing street now for more than a decade. Yet she continues to play a major - albeit subtle - role in both British politics and international relations.
In Statecraft she seeks to draw upon her vast experience in foreign affairs and international diplomacy to suggest some strategies for the modern diplomat. The book covers almost everything one could want to know about a range of topics, including the end of the Cold War, the instabilities of Russia and the Balkans, the might of the Asian Economy, the Anglo-American "Special Relationship" and its role in international affairs, Britain's love-hate relationship with Europe... the list is almost endless. Throughout the books she presents her arguments with her characteristic clarity and bluntness.
No matter what one thinks about Lady Thatcher's years in Government - I am not too enthused by her social policy - this book is essential reading for anyone interested in international relations and politics. An inspirational read.
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on 25 May 2007
Firstly, a warning to potential buyers: because this book was first written in 2001 and then given a post 9/11 tweak in 2002 some of the comments are slightly out of date regarding the situation in the Balkans and the accession of former Soviet Union states to the EU. This aside, however, Baroness Thatcher's book is an excellent example of out of the box thinking, unrestrained by political strait-jackets. As you would expect there is fulsome praise of the United States which is used as the benchmark for economic and military applications in the modern world, although whether Mrs. Thatcher would be as enthusiastic following the recent debacle in Iraq is another question. The key theme of the book is sovereignty and the ability of states to act independently, whether this is demonstrated by making its own laws, deploying its military resources or entering into trading alliances; in other words no to a federal Europe, no to a European defence force, no to a single currency all of which make sense given the unwieldy decision making processes of the EU. This is robust, opinionated writing, and the defense of capitalism should be read by anyone interested in how to create a dynamic economy, especially the light-blue successors to Mrs. T. Great stuff, lets hope she writes another soon.
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In this brilliant book, Thatcher discusses the state of the world at the start of the 21st century and the way forward, drawing on her considerable experience and keen insights. Chapter One: cold war reflections, touches on many subjects from the information revolution to the victory of the West in the cold war. Chapter Two looks at the American achievement including the concept of a unipolar world, military preparedness, defence technologies and missile defence.
Chapter Three deals with Russia, the legacy of communism, the role of the IMF, the failed economic reforms, the country's relations with its former Soviet colonies and what remains of its military power. Part One of Chapter Four explains why Asia, with half of the world's population and a third of all dry land, matters so much. Part Two deals with the Tigers: Singapore, South Korea and Indonesia, whilst Part Three is devoted to Japan. The next chapter, Asian Giants, deals with China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) and India.
In Chapter Six, rogue states, religion and terrorism are discussed, with particular reference to North Korea, Islam, Iraq, Syria, Lybia and Iran. In Chapter Seven, Thatcher discusses human rights, genocide, the Yugoslavia and Rwanda criminal tribunals, the international criminal court and European court of human rights.
Chapter Eight investigates the Balkan wars whilst Chapter Nine is devoted to the European Union. Thatcher investigates the roots of the European idea, the European economic and social model, the pensions crisis, the common agricultural policy, the Euro currency as a means towards a superstate and the bureaucratic, anti-democratic nature of the EU.
Thatcher warns against the creeping loss of sovereignty to unaccountable EU bureaucrats who have only contempt for democracy. The next chapter looks at the current situation of the UK by investigating all the options of how her country might extricate itself from this mess. She advises Britain to stick to the Pound and to renegotiate the structure of the EU.
The last chapter strikes a devastating blow to the critics of capitalism by illustrating how well the free economies have been performing as opposed to the shackled economies of the remaining authoritarian regimes. She also dissects the absurdities of the global warming scare and discusses globalism and its enemies.
The postscript deals with accountability and the Magna Carta in a delightful description of Thatcher and her husband's visit to the memorial at Runnymede. She concludes the book with the observation that the political culture of the English-speaking peoples has given the world the ideas that power should be limited, force should not overrule justice plus the conviction that individuals have an absolute moral worth.
There are 20 full color potgraphs, 13 maps and 8 tables that enhances this highly readable and illuminating text. Bibliographic references are scattered throughout and the book concludes with a thorough index.
0Comment|13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
In this brilliant book, Thatcher discusses the state of the world at the start of the 21st century and the way forward, drawing on her considerable experience and keen insights. Chapter One: cold war reflections, touches on many subjects from the information revolution to the victory of the West in the cold war. Chapter Two looks at the American achievement including the concept of a unipolar world, military preparedness, defence technologies and missile defence.
Chapter Three deals with Russia, the legacy of communism, the role of the IMF, the failed economic reforms, the country's relations with its former Soviet colonies and what remains of its military power. Part One of Chapter Four explains why Asia, with half of the world's population and a third of all dry land, matters so much. Part Two deals with the Tigers: Singapore, South Korea and Indonesia, whilst Part Three is devoted to Japan. The next chapter, Asian Giants, deals with China (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) and India.
In Chapter Six, rogue states, religion and terrorism are discussed, with particular reference to North Korea, Islam, Iraq, Syria, Lybia and Iran. In Chapter Seven, Thatcher discusses human rights, genocide, the Yugoslavia and Rwanda criminal tribunals, the international criminal court and European court of human rights.
Chapter Eight investigates the Balkan wars whilst Chapter Nine is devoted to the European Union. Thatcher investigates the roots of the European idea, the European economic and social model, the pensions crisis, the common agricultural policy, the Euro currency as a means towards a superstate and the bureaucratic, anti-democratic nature of the EU.
Thatcher warns against the creeping loss of sovereignty to unaccountable EU bureaucrats who have only contempt for democracy. The next chapter looks at the current situation of the UK by investigating all the options of how her country might extricate itself from this mess. She advises Britain to stick to the Pound and to renegotiate the structure of the EU.
The last chapter strikes a devastating blow to the critics of capitalism by illustrating how well the free economies have been performing as opposed to the shackled economies of the remaining authoritarian regimes. She also dissects the absurdities of the global warming scare and discusses globalism and its enemies.
The postscript deals with accountability and the Magna Carta in a delightful description of Thatcher and her husband's visit to the memorial at Runnymede. She concludes the book with the observation that the political culture of the English-speaking peoples has given the world the ideas that power should be limited, force should not overrule justice plus the conviction that individuals have an absolute moral worth.
There are 20 full color potgraphs, 13 maps and 8 tables that enhances this highly readable and illuminating text. Bibliographic references are scattered throughout and the book concludes with a thorough index.
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on 9 June 2013
I read Statecraft when it first appeared over a decade ago and I have just finished reading it for a second time. It remains as relevant today as it was then. Statecraft is of course the art of statesmen and women, and this book is written by a well versed practitioner. This is Thatcher's intellectual legacy to the world and so she doesn't fall into the clichés we have grown accustomed to over the past decade when reading about the future of the World. It is a tour de force for all those interested in the politics of the XXI century.
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on 4 October 2011
First of all you have to put aside the fact that this is a totally biased account of the state of the world, based on one person's experience. However, given that that one person has spoken to most of the important leaders of the era which she writes about, this of course qualifies her to pass judgement and express her opinion without having to refer to academic notes or studies.

This is a fascinating read for anyone interested in Thatcher, world history and politics. Most of the points are made with passion and succinctly, in a way that can convince the most ardent oponent.
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on 2 May 2003
.
( first see SYNOPSIS, TABLE OF CONTENTS and SAMPLE PAGES on amazon.co.uk and amazon.com )
The "one more book" which The Iron Lady wanted to write. And evidently, she has much to say; she has yet to run out of material.
Lady Thatcher's abilities once again are proven to go beyond her EXPERIENCE. Undiminished in her capacity to put forward an argument and explain it convincingly. Her forcefulness might harden opposition, but her arguments remain impeccable.
Never loquacious, never verbose. The topics are divided into very concise pieces running no more than a few pages each at most, sometimes just half a page. And coherently grouped into chapters. With historical background where needed, which together with anecdotes, make a most engaging read.
Regardless of what one thinks her other faults are, none of them lessen the impact of her time on the world stage--someone who was not just present during the historic moments, she often made them happen, steering events in that direction, when lesser men would have merely sailed where the wind was already blowing anyway. And regardless of what one has against her, her achievements are unmatched. Precisely what comes across yet again in this book.
Best read after The Downing Street Years and The Path to Power.
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