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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Whatever happened to our heroes? With the exception of a few (I hear the guy out of Risky Business did OK for himself), the majority of our Brat Pack idols unfortunately seem to have disappeared without a trace. As Ellie Eversholt turns 30, she ponders why life didn't turn out quite how her heroes had made out it would in their movies. Stuck in a job she hates, living with the flatmate from hell and experiencing boyfriend and parent trouble, she wonders where she went wrong. She decides that only one person can help her find the answers to her questions, so with best friend Julia in tow, she sets off on a quest to find Andrew McCarthy (have you also ever wondered where he is now?) Starting in LA, then across to New York, they pick up various clues and characters along the way. It's a crazy cross-country ride - sometimes happy, sometimes sad but always hilarious and optimistic. Does Ellie find the answers to her questions? Does she find the man himself? Do you remeber how awful Molly Ringwald looked in that terrible pink dress? If you do, then you have to read this book. Jenny Colgan has brilliantly captured the feel of the 80's through the songs and movies which were the soundtrack (and saviour) of our teenage years. Excellent flashback!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 22 October 2001
If you are a 30something 80's chick, a fan of the Brat Pack movies and, of course, a fan of Andrew McCarthy - this book is for you. Of course it helps that Jenny Colgan writes the funniest books I've ever read. It made me smile from beginning to end and made me laugh out loud page after page. Brilliant!
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30 of 37 people found the following review helpful
on 26 September 2001
This book is fantastic if like me you are a complete freak when it comes to anything to do with the era that forgot taste - that's right the 1980's. The main character in this book is a 30 year old called Ellie who has a fixation with the Brat Pack (the group of young actors back in the '80s that included Tom Cruise, Rob Lowe and of course Andrew Macarthy!)
Ellie can't help thinking that somehow the Brat Pack and rather more importantly Andrew Macarthy have the answer to all lifes problems, and she figures that if she could only find Andrew then she will be able to get her life back on track (oh and did I mention that she also has planned on marrying him since she was a young girl, wearing a ra - ra skirt?!)
Her quest takes her to America where she visits several places and meets some amazing people. But does she find Andrew? Does she find real love? Indeed, does she find happiness? Well you will have to read the book to find out. I dont want to spoil it for you.
This book is amazing, fantastic and both funny and sometimes sad (it brought tears to my eyes in both senses!)
There are many film and music references to keep the '80s fans interested and if like me you have always wanted to go to an American Highschool Prom then this most definately is the book for you!
I reckon that this book would appeal to anybody who likes a bit of old fashioned angst in their books, with a bit of romance chucked in for good measure. If you have ever had a crush on anybody ever then this most definately is the book for you :o)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 14 June 2013
I have read this book so many times I have lost count. I can totally relate to Ellie the main character and loved the 80s brat pack references
That aside, its hilariously written, I always have quite a few embarrasing laugh out loud on public transport moments when I read this.
Fun is the best thing to have :)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 June 2014
The first Jenny Colgan book.I have read that didn't.have me.hooked. too many characters to ever really be sure who was.who, and an.unbelievable.storyline.dotted with eighties references which I thought I would.love but just found really irritating. Don't bother.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 2 January 2002
I think Jenny Colgan's books are just getting better and better. This is by far her most ambitious novel yet, dealing in an incredibly light way with that crisis we all hit at 30, wondering if the accidents and loose decisions that took us to where we are amount to happiness or a life sentence. Then, which is riskier, to give up and join the ratrace as best you can, or to embarrass all your friends by trying to make your dreams come true? Caught in just such a dilemma, the heroine of Looking... decides to get some answers, from someone who should know. Of course, the search is the point, but both the quest and its resolution are funny, wise, and surprising. Since Colgan can make people come alive in just a quick sketch, the book is driven by its varied and vivid characters. If you can't recognise the three-dimensionality of people like Julia, Loxy, Arthur, Colin or Siobhan, then you should leave the Army. The writing is studded but not swamped with nostalgic 80s colour, and as usual with this author, it is very very funny. I was really impressed with how the book captures the feeling of being in London, LA, or New York, without ever turning into a travelogue. Jenny Colgan has a special gift for dialogue, and a way with reversals, zingers and universal themes that makes her the Douglas Adams of the romantically adrift. But where Adams fills the gaps between gags with absurdist space fantasy, Colgan has psychological depth. Consistently in her books, she hasn't been afraid to show her central characters as confused, lonely and even sad. Ellie's evolving relationships with her dad, her friends and more than one Andrew illustrate Colgan's underlying point: that events and experience can change, if not your personality, then at least your perspective. It will be interesting to see how she follows this book.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 20 July 2002
I managed to read this book the whole way through, in hope that it would get better. It had so much potential, but fell very short of what I expected. The characters were annoying, especially Big Bastard and Colin. Why were they even in it, just how old was Colin supposed to be anyway? The references to the eighties weren't even enough to save it. This book was far-fetched, and juvenile.
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on 6 August 2002
I've enjoyed Jenny's previous books and although I found this perfectly entertaining for a day by the swimming pool on holiday, I thought it a bit sketchy and wished that she'd taken more time to pad characters and situations out a bit more. I loved all the 80's reminiscing (why wasn't detention at school ever like the Breakfast Club?) and it's certainly readable enough, but I can't help wishing for a bit more detail.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 23 January 2002
There's something quite impressive in the way this book takes no notice of any kind of reality as far as the plot is concerned. Well, fiction is fiction so perhaps it doesn't matter, but straining credulity this far weakens the characters too, so I didn't believe in -or sympathise with - those either. Amanda's Wedding, J.Colgan's first book, was much better than this. She is a good writer, and should be able to write a better book - perhaps she needs to slow down and think more carefully, and do some background research - it helps even light writing.
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on 24 July 2014
I was going to give this book 5 stars. But the ending was rather disappointing, instead of an "oh what a wonderful ending" it was just an "oh" it felt as if there wasn't really a conclusion, hence only 4 stars. The rest of the book was fantastic! I laughed, I cried and couldn't put the book down. So apart from the end was a very good read.
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