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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shows you how things could and should be....
thought this was an excellent book. As with the others in this series it's a bit American but despite that contains some good stuff.
The main thing I got from the book is a sight of how things should be in terms of an effectively delegated workload. Then that is sufficiently motivating that you can pick up some of the techniques and systems that are suggested to...
Published on 7 Mar. 2005 by Kevin Roberts

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An over-worked analogy
As a fan of Blanchard's work, particularly 'The one minute manager' I looked forward with great expectation to reading this book. However, despite a strong opening section, the book quickly fizzled out into an over-worked analogy that ran out of steam after about seventy pages of a one hundred and thirty page book.
In essence, the ideas expressed in the work are...
Published on 30 May 2000 by Tom Carroll


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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shows you how things could and should be...., 7 Mar. 2005
This review is from: The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey (The One Minute Manager) (Paperback)
thought this was an excellent book. As with the others in this series it's a bit American but despite that contains some good stuff.
The main thing I got from the book is a sight of how things should be in terms of an effectively delegated workload. Then that is sufficiently motivating that you can pick up some of the techniques and systems that are suggested to start working towards that. I don't think there is any overnight fix to this kind of thing, which is why the mix of pragmatic stuff to do today and the vision of how things should be is a powerful mix.
Any book you can read in a quick burst and contains one or two thought provoking and applicable ideas has got to be good value.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open Up Initiative Throughout the Organization!, 13 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey (The One Minute Manager) (Paperback)
This book does a great job of helping people focus on their own work.
Many people in an organization focus on managing the boss rather than doing their own job. What better way to manage the boss than to constantly seek her/his guidance on everything? Then, the boss can be flattered that you want his/her help, and will also take the blame if anything goes wrong. Insecure bosses like to be involved, so that fewer "errors" occur.
This wonderful book points out that no one can learn without making errors. Also, if you and your subordinate are doing the same job, one of you is superfluous. A common source of stalled thinking in this area is focusing on the fact that you, as manager, can do the job better and faster than you can teach the task or job to someone. What managers fail to realize is that someone closer to the source of the problem should be able to come up with a better solution. Also, the time taken to teach someone else to do the task is usually much less over a year or two than the time taken to help someone learn the task.
The key problem is that we all like to fall back on doing what we are comfortable with and are good at rather than new challenges where we are not so competent. Banish that feeling!
This book gives you lots of practical ideas for how to respond to efforts by your subordinates and colleagues to delegate their work and responsibility to you. You will learn how to see them coming and to keep the monkey where it belongs: with them.
If you find that you are pressed for time, this book is an important source of ideas to free up your life to have less stress while you and your organization both accomplish more.
Good luck with taking care of your monkey business! It's an important step toward developing an irresistible growth enterprise.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books I have read. And, reread, and reread., 10 July 1998
By A Customer
Not just for managers! Read this if you're managed. Read this if you're a parent. Easy-to-read, quick read. Get this book. I gave a copy to my pastor, and he bought copies for the elders.
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54 of 59 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cut other peoples Monkeys free and regain control, 28 Jun. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey (The One Minute Manager) (Paperback)
Ken Blanchard, Hal Burrows and the late William Oncken define the problem of picking up other peoples Monkeys. The little problems that effectively stop you from performing at your optimum efficency.
Learn the four simple rules from the One Minute Manager to pass these Monkeys back to the approriate keeper and reduce the burden on yourself.
This is great follow on in the classic One Minute Manager series and is to be well recommended to anyone who who finds themself burdoned down with other peoples problems. Regain control. Cut the Monkeys free.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How did I survive without this book?, 10 Sept. 2007
By 
This review is from: The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey (The One Minute Manager) (Paperback)
To say this book accurately reflects the common delegation and mgmt pitfalls that I and most new managers fall into is an understatement.

I read this book at the weekend, and for the first time in weeks i'm actually enjoying being in work.

A "MUST READ" for any manager who's feeling their quality life is being wrecked by too much work.

This book may well just save my sanity :-)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A simple idea-make the people you manage do their work, 23 Oct. 2000
By A Customer
I'd forgotten that I still had this book, which has been around for 10 years or so. What rang true for me was after the first chapter I realised I was carrying many of my staff's monkeys, and thereby preventing them from realising their own potential. A simple idea which is easy to apply straight away..I'm lending it to or buying it for all my managers.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open Up Initiative Throughout the Organization!, 13 May 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This book does a great job of helping people focus on their own work.
Many people in an organization focus on managing the boss rather than doing their own job. What better way to manage the boss than to constantly seek her/his guidance on everything? Then, the boss can be flattered that you want his/her help, and will also take the blame if anything goes wrong. Insecure bosses like to be involved, so that fewer "errors" occur.
This wonderful book points out that no one can learn without making errors. Also, if you and your subordinate are doing the same job, one of you is superfluous. A common source of stalled thinking in this area is focusing on the fact that you, as manager, can do the job better and faster than you can teach the task or job to someone. What managers fail to realize is that someone closer to the source of the problem should be able to come up with a better solution. Also, the time taken to teach someone else to do the task is usually much less over a year or two than the time taken to help someone learn the task.
The key problem is that we all like to fall back on doing what we are comfortable with and are good at rather than new challenges where we are not so competent. Banish that feeling!
This book gives you lots of practical ideas for how to respond to efforts by your subordinates and colleagues to delegate their work and responsibility to you. You will learn how to see them coming and to keep the monkey where it belongs: with them.
If you find that you are pressed for time, this book is an important source of ideas to free up your life to have less stress while you and your organization both accomplish more.
Good luck with taking care of your monkey business! It's an important step toward developing an irresistible growth enterprise.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
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5.0 out of 5 stars Open Up Initiative Throughout the Organization!, 4 Aug. 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This book does a great job of helping people focus on their own work.
Many people in an organization focus on managing the boss rather than doing their own job. What better way to manage the boss than to constantly seek her/his guidance on everything? Then, the boss can be flattered that you want his/her help, and will also take the blame if anything goes wrong. Insecure bosses like to be involved, so that fewer "errors" occur.
This wonderful book points out that no one can learn without making errors. Also, if you and your subordinate are doing the same job, one of you is superfluous. A common source of stalled thinking in this area is focusing on the fact that you, as manager, can do the job better and faster than you can teach the task or job to someone. What managers fail to realize is that someone closer to the source of the problem should be able to come up with a better solution. Also, the time taken to teach someone else to do the task is usually much less over a year or two than the time taken to help someone learn the task.
The key problem is that we all like to fall back on doing what we are comfortable with and are good at rather than new challenges where we are not so competent. Banish that feeling!
This book gives you lots of practical ideas for how to respond to efforts by your subordinates and colleagues to delegate their work and responsibility to you. You will learn how to see them coming and to keep the monkey where it belongs: with them.
If you find that you are pressed for time, this book is an important source of ideas to free up your life to have less stress while you and your organization both accomplish more.
Good luck with taking care of your monkey business! It's an important step toward developing an irresistible growth enterprise.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "there are always more monkeys clamouring for attention than we have time to manage", 24 July 2009
By 
Nicholas J. R. Dougan "Nick Dougan" (Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
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Although part of Ken Blanchard's One Minute Manager series of short management books, the Monkey Manager idea comes from the late William Oncken Jr's "Managing Management's Time" seminars - still promoted by the organisation that bears his name.

A monkey is defined as the "next move" or task in a project, and the authors explain in the normal anecdotal style of this series how subordinates often succeed in delegating such tasks upwards to their harries managers, who, by accepting such tasks, make themselves the bottlenecks in their departments and unwittingly teach their subordinates that they don't really trust them. Their reward - even more "monkeys".

Blanchard, Oncken and Burrows proceed to demonstrate how a manager can give those monkeys back to subordinates, to everyone's increased satisfaction in the long run, make sure that new monkeys are correctly assigned to people in the first place and, in due course, how responsibilities for certain types of monkeys can be delegated properly, so that managers need on get involved in exceptional problems.

This is a great little book - only takes couple of hours to read its 130 pages - and if you can lived with the continuous repetition of the word "monkey" as a jargon word, which did get a little tiresome after a while, I believe that you would find it of great value.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best management books I have read., 2 Jan. 2011
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This review is from: The One Minute Manager Meets the Monkey (The One Minute Manager) (Paperback)
I have read hundreds of management books over the last five decades and can honestly say that this one is the best value for money you can ever hope to buy.

However, Because you have read this one, don't automatically assume you will get the same amount of value from the others in the "One Minute Manager" series.

I have recommended this to a score of friends and colleagues always with the same promise. Which is "if you don't find this book is worth the money, give it to me and I will refund the clost to you in full." Not one of the twenty people came back to me.

There are too many managers too ready to have their employees "monkeys" scramble on to their backs. (The monkey is the problem and this shows how to help "grow" your employee without taking their "monkey" onto your back.)

Many junior staff are "punch-drunk" by the time they get to you. They have been sworn at, shouted at, to such an extent that they are frighted to assume any authority for themselves. This shows how you can take one of these, now frightened people, and grow them into people who can take decisions for themselves.

As far as I can remember, the book is only around 150 pages. I came here as I am about to buy two more for people I know.
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