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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More Abarat? Yes please.
Now I'm not a huge Barker fan, however I enjoyed the first Abarat book and was looking foward to the continuing adventures of Candy Quackenbush. "Days of Magic, Nights of War" covers another handful of Hours (islands) from the world of Abarat, giving Barker free reign to be inventive, bizzare and, as ever, all tinted with an edge of possibility. It's the hint of realism...
Published on 19 Aug 2006 by SonicQuack

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A laquered empty box
There are good things about this recent Clive Barker escapade: it is an extremely beautiful object, with rich illustrations (which seem lavish, but are very simple once you look at them closely) and Clive's inimitable abilty to draw bizarre and extraordinary creatures and make them more believable than human ones. However, there are also the usual failings: completely...
Published on 19 Sep 2004


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More Abarat? Yes please., 19 Aug 2006
By 
SonicQuack (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Now I'm not a huge Barker fan, however I enjoyed the first Abarat book and was looking foward to the continuing adventures of Candy Quackenbush. "Days of Magic, Nights of War" covers another handful of Hours (islands) from the world of Abarat, giving Barker free reign to be inventive, bizzare and, as ever, all tinted with an edge of possibility. It's the hint of realism that keeps you reading - it's written in such simple narrative how can it not be fact. As far as the style, I found it to be less dark that the predecessor, and although Carrion and Mater were still very much present, their malign characterisations were not as strong. Without offering any spoilers, I believe Barker attempts to fix this at the end of the book. The book introduces a strong central story which will propel us through the next volume and has created the idea of a Tolkein "company" to fight the evil menaces from the Midnight Hour, almost all of the characters you'll already know from the first book. Overall, there's a great movie like feel to the book. It's fast paced, surreal and nightmarish in parts; a page-turner with lots of surprises and a brilliant plotted end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magic from Abarat Flows to Chickentown ..., 18 Feb 2006
By 
This review is from: Abarat 2: Days of Magic, Nights of War: Days of Magic, Nights of War Bk.2 (Hardcover)
Reading about the journey of Candy Quackenbush within the Abarat is a far more enjoyable experience in book two. The author expands his imagination as he introduces more unusual intelligent mythical creatures. It is a pleasure discovering the eccentricities of each new creature as Candy encounters the cultural differences within this archipelago. The reader is now familiar with the territory and eagerly turns the pages anticipating each new thrill, knowing at any point ... with a twist and turn of events ... there maybe an ambush by Christopher Carrion, Lord of Midnight or one of his subordinates. By now the reader knows he has an obsession with meeting Candy to discover the source of her magic. He is convinced she possesses special powers for having survived the many obstacles placed in her path and having vanquished highly formidable foes sent by him to capture her. The fact she has managed to evade him is an endless source of irritation which goads him further on his mission. One unexpected source of pleasure is reading how his grandmother Mother Motley has insight into his devious plans and even sees within his heart what his true desires are. She sews day and night helping to create an army of fiends to aide him during the anticipated battle to win control of the Abarat. More surprises await the reader as Christopher Carrion and his grandmother clash on personal levels when she hurls insults and hateful epitaphs at him. While one is rooting for Candy to overcome their evil intentions ... the reader can not but laugh at some of the clashes between these two villains. There is truth to the old adage 'divide and conquer'...
The friendly and unique creatures from book one, such as John Mischief, the other Johns and Malingo, become old pals as the reader is taken down meandering pathways exploring the islands and experiencing new adventures. New challenges await Candy and one of the most gratifying discoveries within the book is when Candy *finally* meets the dragon slayer ... Finnegan Hob who had been engaged to Princess Boa, who was killed by a dragon. This reader is very pleased the author did not cop out and create a romantic interlude betweeen these characters. Romance would diminish the natural appeal of the books which is reading about imaginary creatures, magical mythical islands where the heroine experiences excitement and adventure.
The author does a superb job of weaving together a common thread which ties the Abarat and Chickentown. It is heart warming to read how Candy, at last, communicates with her mom, dad and brothers. The mysterious connection between the three wise ladies from the Abarat who sailed on the Sea of Izabella and Candy Quackenbush of Chickentown Minnesota is revealed. The reader learns how and why Candy Quackenbush came to possess unique powers of magic ... This story is complete in all of its myriad of details and magic. It fully deserves 5 stars. Thanks to Allison for lending me book two. Erika Borsos (bakonyvilla)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Once More into this Dazzling Wonderland, 23 Nov 2004
By 
Peter Chandler "hemlock_wolf" (Whitby, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Abarat 2: Days of Magic, Nights of War: Days of Magic, Nights of War Bk.2 (Hardcover)
The second book from Clive Barker's Abarat charts much the same course as with the first. The images and dazzling magical visions are once again there to enrapture and enchant and enthrall. It is also good to see that once again Clive Barker does not shirk from treating his younger readers with the intelligence and respect they deserve. The characters are all very well rounded (for a story aimed at younger readers) and though the base of the story is a struggle of good and evil the depth of the characters adds a good deal more to it than that. Perhaps this second book does suffer a bit however in being too much like the first. The story does, perhaps, flag for a time being too caught up in its own colourful magic, although it does build up to a very impressively gripping ending. It will be interesting to see if Clive Barker can fully carry the story through into the next book of the series, since there are signs here that perhaps the ideas are running thin and such a series cannot rely entirely on the wonders of its universe forever without injecting something new into the story. This still is though a very high quality tale for the younger reader and, fingers crossed, it will remain so as the story is continued.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A laquered empty box, 19 Sep 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Abarat 2: Days of Magic, Nights of War: Days of Magic, Nights of War Bk.2 (Hardcover)
There are good things about this recent Clive Barker escapade: it is an extremely beautiful object, with rich illustrations (which seem lavish, but are very simple once you look at them closely) and Clive's inimitable abilty to draw bizarre and extraordinary creatures and make them more believable than human ones. However, there are also the usual failings: completely flat human characters that lack motivation and seemingly take otherwordly happenings with a pinch of salt, and a rambling narrative. The books ends as if it needs another three parts; and whilst I appreciate it does have them to come, it really should have had some completion within itself.
Clive is always heralded as a great shapeshifter of the literary world, but I am truly getting a little tired of the continuance of the, "ordinary person, finds doorway into another world - or worlds - and finds themselves to be the saviour of the world - or worlds" theme, as we saw in 'Imagica', 'Weaveworld', 'The Great and Secret Show', 'The Thief of Always', not to mention in subtler ways in 'Cabal' and 'The Hellbound Heart'. I suppose it would frustrate me less if he simply admitted that this previously mined vein of storyline - from Tolkien to C.S Lewis is what motivates his work primarily, instead of continually heralding himself as such an original with diversity in approach and premise with every novel. It's the same old same old, I'm disappointed to say.
I also would have liked to have seen this 'Book of Hours' Actually have something to do with time. Maybe this is something he explores further in the later volumes. And I would have preferred it if the islands actually had more coherent familiarities with the hours they were named after.
That said, the good things about it are the feel and smell of the book (It's like holding one big lush painting) and the finely drawn creatures and landscapes Clive can muster from his illustrious imagination.
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5.0 out of 5 stars 0, 8 Feb 2006
By 
Chris Hall "DLS Reviews" (Cardiff, Wales) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Abarat 2: Days of Magic, Nights of War: Days of Magic, Nights of War Bk.2 (Hardcover)
Published in 2004 by HarperCollins Publishers, this is the second installation to the ‘Books Of Abarat’ quartet of novels. Following on from the imaginative and beautifully magical first book of the Abarat, Barker has delivered a longer and just as inspiring novel running for a total of 491 pages. Within these pages are literally hundreds of oil paintings done by Barker himself, to illustrate the novel as the story unfolds. These illustrations are again printed in full colour on thick, glossy pages for the hardback version. With such beautifully painted illustrations it is very advisable to purchase this hardback version, rather than waiting for the release of the cheaper paperback.
Barker’s impressive imagination shows no bounds as you are taken on a journey through the wonderful world of his limitless mind. His characterization is superb, delivering such vivid and well-presented characters in the ever-unfolding twists and turns of the novel’s plot. The storyline is layered with many depths to each character involved, bringing out an overall richness to the book as a whole. The novel is suitable for adults and a younger audience who will both take a lot from the story in their own unique ways.
It is advisable to read the first book of the quartet before undertaking this adventure, but it is still possible to enjoy the book as a novel in its own right.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wow!, 26 Nov 2004
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This review is from: Abarat 2: Days of Magic, Nights of War: Days of Magic, Nights of War Bk.2 (Hardcover)
It's not often I can honestly say I loved to read a story, but this is one of those times. Having thoroughly enjoyed the first book, I couldn't wait to get into the second (had to though, waiting for publishing).
I know it is aimed at a younger audience than Barker's usual output, but I think that is why I liked the story so much. The imagination factor is cranked up to dizzy heights without the usual dark madness that features in books like Imajica and Weaveworld. There is a refreshing lack of exploration of the characters' thoughts and feelings on every subject - which can tends to weight down adult reading. The main character of Candy does not agonise over her decisions, she just does it.
I was fascinated by the thread of Carrion - Boa - Candy, and the complete lack of conscience of Mater Motley.
Guess I'll just have to wait for the next book to find out how Candy gets on (sighs).
This will be a favourite read now.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great sequel, but a bit chunky!, 20 Mar 2010
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I thoroughly enjoyed this book, it was funny and magical and full of adventure.

It did lack a little of the simplicity of the first book, had a few pages too many and suffered from being 'The middle book' not a self-contained story....

That said, I am looking forward to reading Part 3 when it hits paperback!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Pure class, 8 April 2014
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As a fan of Mr barker 's creativity you will not realie need me to tell how engrossing his books are, this part of the abarat story is as good as the first part and I look forward to part3 if you are hesitant about buying this .......... Don't be silly buy it read it love it :)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, 5 Dec 2013
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Part two of the brilliant fantasy trilogy by Clive Barker. This is a book that is really easy to read and lose yourself in, no less than you'd expect from one of the best authors on the planet!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great series, 9 Oct 2013
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Couldn't wait for book two, now I have read it can't wait to read the next instalment of this great fantasy
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