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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Into the lands of the northern giants, and beyond
Although set late in the reign of Caspian X (the Navigator), and thus being near the end of the series both in publication order and internal chronology, in some ways THE SILVER CHAIR would be a good place for a new reader to start, without re-covering a lot of material returning readers will have seen before. The viewpoint character, Jill Pole, is a complete newcomer to...
Published on 11 Jun 2006 by Michele L. Worley

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Not the edition advertised
The book is excellent, going from memory. I remember reading it several times as a child. However we bought a set that was missing this book from the series, and wanted specifically the colour-illustrated edition, but what turned up was a different edition, not even the same cover, never mind the colour illustrations. Rather disappointing. The seller refunded our buying...
Published 2 months ago by Standing in the need of prayer


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Into the lands of the northern giants, and beyond, 11 Jun 2006
By 
Michele L. Worley (Kingdom of the Mouse, United States) - See all my reviews
Although set late in the reign of Caspian X (the Navigator), and thus being near the end of the series both in publication order and internal chronology, in some ways THE SILVER CHAIR would be a good place for a new reader to start, without re-covering a lot of material returning readers will have seen before. The viewpoint character, Jill Pole, is a complete newcomer to Narnia, and despite being accompanied by a more experienced schoolmate, she starts out with as unbiased a view of Narnia as any other character in the series, since she is separated from her companion Eustace Scrubb almost immediately.

Jill and Eustace are schoolmates at a very badly run boarding school - something the author knew a lot about from personal experience, though with a different set of horrors than Lewis himself went through. Eustace takes Jill into his confidence - he began standing up to the school bullies rather than sucking up to them this school year because he'd had some very strange experiences with magic during the holidays, though he hasn't time to explain very much before the two of them have to escape from a gang of the worst bullies, and flee through a door that unexpectedly opens into the Narnian world.

As is often the case, just as the two children were longing to escape into the Narnian world, that turns out to have been a sign that they were needed there. This time, the two of them are separated soon after their arrival thanks to some bad judgement on Jill's part. Consequently, when Jill meets Aslan for the first time and receives their instructions from him about the quest for which they have been called out of their own world, she does so alone and with no preconceptions about who the great lion is or what he's like.

Jill and Eustace (with whom she is reunited some hours later in Narnia itself), are to find the lost crown prince of Narnia - Rilian, the only son of King Caspian the Navigator - and bring him home. Jill is given a list of signs to memorize that, if heeded, will help them on their way, then is sent after Eustace by magic to Cair Paravel, the capital of Narnia.

In general, the two children are written very well; although they're both decent and mean well, neither is a saint, and they've got different strengths and weaknesses. Eustace is afraid of heights and can be matter-of-fact in a maddening way, but he's an experienced traveller thanks to his earlier adventures in Narnia. Jill's particular strengths take longer to come out, but she's game for adventure herself. In a way, this makes THE SILVER CHAIR an unusually pleasant read - while the protagonists have weaknesses, Eustace's trials in THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER helped him master most of his worst faults, and the problems the two of them have are mostly ordinary disagreements and bad temper under stress.

Not surprisingly after their separation, Eustace is rather annoyed with Jill and not inclined to listen, and they soon miss the first of the signs - Eustace having seen but failed to greet an old friend who could've helped them, not recognizing the now-elderly Caspian. By the time they learn the identity of the king sailing out of the harbour, it's too late - they're left to explain themselves to the regent, who's intensely loyal but too rule-bound to cope with an unorthodox situation. Fortunately, some of the younger members of the court, mostly talking owls, hear Jill and Eustace out, and set them on their way in the company of Puddleglum, a very trustworthy Marsh-wiggle who accompanies them north into the land of the giants, where they begin their search for the lost prince.

I recommend the unabridged recording narrated by Jeremy Northam (whose voice, especially at first, reminds me strongly of that of Jeremy Irons). As well as having a very good voice for Aslan, he does a fine job with Caspian's crusty old regent, the hooting voices of the talking owls, morose Puddleglum, and the honeyed voice of the Queen of Underland, among others. He's also able to handle the range of reactions without slipping into making inappropriate changes of tone - he can read some very annoying characters (a few giantesses given to rather soppy reactions to children, for instance) without breaking stride or character.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Puddleglum's Progress, 20 April 2009
This review is from: The Silver Chair (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 6) (Paperback)
"The Silver Chair" is the penultimate Narnia story, chronologically. The Pevensie children are totally absent from this book and instead, the children from our world sent to Narnia on a quest are Eustace Scrubb, who we met in "The Voyage of the Dawn Treader" and Jill Pole, a girl from Eustace's rather radical school.

The two children, who are not necessarily the best of friends at all times, are joined by a wonderfully morose character, Puddleglum the Marsh-Wiggle. The adventures they have on their search for King Caspian's lost son and heir seem more sinister and frightening than in previous books, so the comic relationships between the three add needed light relief.

A dank, chilly atmosphere pervades the book, with much of the action during winter and underground. The plot is probably tighter than the preceding book, with a clear quest and signs from Aslan to follow.

If anyone doubts the relevance of the Narnia books to today, just read what happened to the Head of the radical school, Experiment House: "...the Head's friends saw that the Head was no use as a Head, so they got her made an inspector to interfere with other Heads. And when they found she wasn't much good even at that, they got her into Parliament where she lived happily ever after." I think she must still be there!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SENSATIONAL, 17 Sep 2000
By A Customer
Eustace and Jill, attempting to flee the bullies at their school and desperate for an escape from the misery of their situation, find themselves transported to Narnia. There they are given a mission by Aslan himself - to find Prince Rilian - son of Caspian - who disappeared many years ago.
They must team up with a Marshwiggle and find themselves in all sorts of scrapes and difficulties before they can achieve what they set out to do. They encounter giants and a strange lady dressed all in green, accompanied by a knight before they find the secret of the Silver Chair and hear the cry for help in Aslan's name!
Exciting and adventurous fun!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Beginning of the End, 25 Jun 2012
It's true that this was only the fourth book to be written. The Magician's Nephew and The Horse and His Boy were both written after this but the first is a prequel to the entire series and the second runs parallel to the last chapter of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe so they both lie outside the timeline and story of the "main" series, of which this is the fourth and penultimate book.

In The Silver Chair we find that the creativity of C.S.Lewis is far from running dry. Once again he fills the book with magical people and places. We meet many memorable characters like Puddleglum the marsh-wiggle, the earthmen and a new lead female named Jill Pole. The adventures come thick and fast as Jill, Eustace and Puddleglum face many dangers as they set out to find Prince Rilian. It has the same "epic quest" feeling as The Voyage of the Dawn Treader and is full of the same balance of terror, humour and beauty.

The beauty comes in two main forms. One is in the descriptions of the lands C.S.Lewis has created and the other is the behaviour of the Narnians. Celebrations and funerals alike are written in very moving language and the reader may find themselves laughing or crying alternatively throughout the novel.

The book is fairly frightening at some points but most younger readers will cope, especially as the book ends on a very hopeful note.

An absolutely beautiful book.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To Save A Prince, 26 July 2003
By 
Mark Baker (Santa Clarita, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Eustace and Jill are called from their school to Narnia by Aslan for a task. King Caspian is old and his only son, Prince Rilian, has been taken hostage. Teaming up with the marsh-wiggle Puddleglum, they journey north from Narnia. But with winter fast approaching, their journey isn't easy. Not to mention the danger they face from giants and a stranger they meet. Will they remember to follow the signs Aslan gave them to help them on their way? Even if they do, can they save the prince?
I absolutely love this book in the series. I'd forgotten how much until I reread it. The quest gives a real sense of adventure. And they seem to meet up with plenty of danger along the way. I get a kick out of Puddleglum's pessimism, as well.
The allegory seems stronger in this book then the last couple. The themes of following God's word and Him using us in spite of our faults (and using our faults) is especially strong. Aslan has the entire thing under control from the beginning; it's just up to Eustace and Jill to actually follow his commands.
This is a wonderful fantasy story with some elements included that will make you think. Definitely a strong book in the series. If you enjoyed the others, be sure to pick this one up as well.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Achingly brilliant adventure, 24 Jan 2009
By 
Martin Turner "Martin Turner" (Marlcliff, Warwickshire, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Silver Chair (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 6) (Paperback)
The Silver Chair is an achingly brilliant adventure in the imaginary world of Narnia, taking us from this world to the end of the world, to Narnia, and then across a bitter winter landscape to a giants' castle, and thence underground for a terrifying (but also satisfying) climax. Written entirely with flawed characters, The Silver Chair is shot through with memorable dialogue, much of it quarrels and arguments, as the three ill-equipped and unlikely heroes set out to save the lost prince whom nobody else could find. Danger, cold, fear and hunger stalk the characters every step of the way, and the book culminates in a series of three separate, echoing climaxes which perfectly complete what is, pretty much, a flawless book.

The first book in the series, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, is about four extremely nice children, one of whom is tempted and misled by the witch. In the second book, Prince Caspian, the four, now all thoroughly nice, team up with the likeable and noble Caspian. It's not until the third book, The Voyage of the "Dawn Treader", that Lewis introduces the first truly unpleasant main character, Eustace Scrubb. Scrubb reforms quite substantially on his voyage, but Lewis brings him back, better, but still imperfect, with the equally imperfect (but in a different way) Jill Pole, and then teams them up with Puddleglum, a lanky greenish individual of the species Marsh Wiggle, whose endlessly depressive conversation would put a damper on any social occasion. Character-wise, this is to me where the series really takes off, preparing us for the other notable pairings, Aravis and Shasta in The Horse and His Boy, Diggory and Polly in The Magician's Nephew, and, of course, Jill and Eustace again in The Last Battle. The conflict and tension that Lewis is able to create with the characters is absolutely vivid, and utterly believable, in a way which few groups of characters in children's novels ever are.

This story is much more thoroughly plotted than the ones that went before it, and, right from Eustace falling from a cliff at the beginning, it keeps us guessing and on tenterhooks all the way through. I remember being really scared at some point in most of the chapters as a child, and, as an adult, I'm still left with the constant sense that the heroes are in real physical and moral danger, and that things are going horribly wrong for most of the time. This is all the more impressive, because I've now read this book more than forty times, and it still maintains the capacity to thrill.

The Silver Chair doesn't have the grand philosophical or theological scope of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, nor the constant play of delight that we find in the Voyage of the "Dawn Treader", or the battle and fighting which is the mark of Prince Caspian. Rather, it is a fight against overwhelming odds, by people seemingly completely ill-equipped for their task. This is one of the great strengths of the Narnia series: no two of the books are alike in plot, theme, or aspiration.

This is the fourth of the Narnia books -- don't be fooled into thinking they should be read in 'chronological' order, because the style of writing and, indeed, the age they are aimed at, develops as the series goes on, in order of publication. If you're interested, you can see this very easily by looking at the length of the books. Each book is longer than the previous one, but, in order to get them into a set similar in size, the publishers have always opted for smaller typefaces as the books go on -- an obvious sign that they are, progressively, aimed at older audiences.

This is the first book in which Lewis introduces an entirely new species as a major character. All of the non-human characters in the first three books are taken from classical or Norse mythology, or from folk and fairy tale. The Marshwiggles are entirely Lewis's own invention, and the book is all the better for them.

If I was forced to pick my favourite of all the Narnia books, it would probably be this one. But, then again...

Highly recommended.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Two children are sent to Narnia for a rescue mission, 21 Nov 2001
Two children are sent to Narnia, a magical place far beyond the eyes of man,to rescue a long-lost prince in an underground world.But will they survive from the man eating giants?
there are three main characters: Puddleglum,a frog like creature who thinks the worst of things.
and Scrubb,a boy who had already been in Narnia .
I thought the book was great, loads of description and adventures. I would recommend it to young readers and adults.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sterling Silver, 8 Nov 2005
By 
Louise Stanley (Reading, Berkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Possibly the most underappreciated of the Chronicles of Narnia, you are left wondering about the title until the very end. Like the others in the series it has a definite moral - here it is that appearances can be deceptive and even those who look good on the outside can have evil in their hearts, a message as relevant to children now as it was in the 1950s when the book was written.
The book introduces put upon Jill Pole as the schoolfriend of Eustace Scrubb, the spoilt brat of "Dawn Treader" redeemed through his adventures at the end of the world with Prince Caspian and Reepicheep. Eustace and Jill escape bullies into Narnia and are given a quest by Aslan. Jill struggles to remember Aslan's instructions, and constantly fails, until they are led straight into the giants' lair at Harfang. All the time they are lured by good things only to be deceived at every level - and almost leave the real good to its doom in underground caverns.
Pauline Baynes' illustrations, like in all the Narnia books, enliven the story and characters from the Marshwiggle to Harfang and beyond.
Carrying a moral rather than a specifically Biblical message, the book delights readers of all ages and the Chronicles as a whole should be on every child's reading list. Hopefully the new film of "The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe" will introduce a new generation of children to this beautiful series; this book in particular develops the character of Aslan beyond "nice cuddly lion" and is worth picking up. Even though my copy is not the new edition, the cover art updates the series for the new millennium.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dark and tense, 26 Feb 2005
By 
Star_Sea "Xing" (Salisbury, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Silver Chair (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 6) (Paperback)
This is probably my favourite of the Narnia books, because nearly everything goes wrong. It starts with Jill crying in the shrubbery because she's being bullied; then Jill and Eustace go on the run from said bullies; even when they get to Narnia, the situation doesn't improve.
Unlike "Voyage of the Dawntreader", where Lucy, Edmund and Eustace were given a royal welcome and found themselves in a safe environment, "Silver Chair" harks back to "Prince Caspian". Just as the Pevensie children found themselves legends and unsupported in a land torn apart by civil war, Jill and Eustace are alone, with only Aslan's clues to guide them. Again, in contrast to "Voyage", there is barely any human interaction before they begin their quest - it is the animals and the creatures of Narnia who aid them. Puddleglum has got to be one of Lewis's best characters, because we all know someone like him - and the best bit is that he's considered 'cheerful' by the standards of his kind! The three of them have to journey out of Narnia, through giant country to find Rillian, meanwhile contending with the weather, the inhabitants and their own failings. I personally found the Green Lady far mroe unnerving than the White Witch ever was...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 15 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Brilliant. Make sure you read the previous five bookes before this one ;)
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The Silver Chair (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 6)
The Silver Chair (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 6) by C. S. Lewis (Paperback - 1 Oct 2001)
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