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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "To share grief is to double grief, not halve it."
The first (and longest at 69pp) of these short stories, The End of the Line, concern the most dislikeable set of people I have ever come across in a book and I found this quite a slog to get through, hissing through my teeth and groaning faintly as I went, although it does have the odd wonderful put-down, as here:

Alison said, "I told him I was contemplating a...
Published on 4 April 2012 by Eileen Shaw

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1.0 out of 5 stars One Star
Not very entertaining. Certainly not upto "she devil" expectations.
Published 6 months ago by Chris PR


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1.0 out of 5 stars One Star, 29 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: Wicked Women (Kindle Edition)
Not very entertaining. Certainly not upto "she devil" expectations.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "To share grief is to double grief, not halve it.", 4 April 2012
By 
Eileen Shaw "Kokoschka's_cat" (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Wicked Women (Paperback)
The first (and longest at 69pp) of these short stories, The End of the Line, concern the most dislikeable set of people I have ever come across in a book and I found this quite a slog to get through, hissing through my teeth and groaning faintly as I went, although it does have the odd wonderful put-down, as here:

Alison said, "I told him I was contemplating a sex-change operation."
"Oh?" Elaine was interested, "What to, male or female?"

Tthe next story, Run and Ask Daddy If He Has Any More Money, was equally hilarious. However, it wasn't until I reached the second part of the collection, Tales of Wicked Men, that I began to relax into Fay Weldon's very abrupt and somewhat throw-away style. Perversely, it was Wasted Lives, a more conventional story set in an unknown city (which I decided might be Kiev, or perhaps Prague) that I found particularly touching, though it ended with one of Weldon's characteristic hard-bitten dismissals of the weaker one of any couple. Love Amongst the Artists, is something of a portent of what is going to happen in a relationship, rather than what is happening now, but it is none-the-worse for that.

Tales of Wicked Children, has only two stories, and it was the second one, Valediction, which told of a family who gathered at Christmas and discussed the sale of the house they had all grown up in and loved. Several people come to view the house and the parents and children are divided on whether they should sell. Finally a decision is reached by the mother and father. In another Christmas story a family falls apart - and this needs to be read carefully because it is a nine year-old child who is the hero of the day. Not all of these stories have unhappy relationships and miserable children at the centre, and it is sometimes awfully middle-class, with some of the self-satisfaction of people with good jobs and houses in nice streets and therefore quietly but tellingly very far from the majority of lives in 2012 in our increasingly unstable and uneasy world.
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Wicked Women
Wicked Women by Fay Weldon (Paperback - 2 Dec. 1996)
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