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49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A relevant take on contemporary society
No Logo is packed with mind-blowing facts about a culture most of us accept as part of our daily life. This book made a real impression upon me - quite an achievement as I'm a dedicated consumer and had been greatly unimpressed with what I'd seen of the anti-globalisation movement.
This book encompasses many themes and for me it offers a modern take on issues of...
Published on 7 Nov 2001

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53 of 56 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A slap in the face for unethical shopping decisions?
I have owned this book for some time, and have only just plucked up the courage to read it. This has taken a month to finish, largely because the issues raised required some thought and resulted in a bit of discussion at home, even briefly diverting attention away from sport on TV. The title makes it clear that the author is taking up a particular, predominantly...
Published on 4 Mar 2002 by monkeyhumble@aol.com


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53 of 56 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A slap in the face for unethical shopping decisions?, 4 Mar 2002
This review is from: No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs (Paperback)
I have owned this book for some time, and have only just plucked up the courage to read it. This has taken a month to finish, largely because the issues raised required some thought and resulted in a bit of discussion at home, even briefly diverting attention away from sport on TV. The title makes it clear that the author is taking up a particular, predominantly negative, attitude towards branding and marketing in the context of globalisation. Naomi Klein has researched the impact of brands on local environments and people, and on the countries where products are manufactured, with reference to the power of multi-nationals to shape national and international politics and policies. I was impressed by the detail in the book, although I found parts of it heavy-going for the same reason.
The chapters dealing with the marketing of brands to young people within schools and universities were particularly interesting-things have changed since my day. I was fascinated by what makes a brand "cool" and how corporations have acquired and then exploited knowledge about us all to create demand for products. I discovered that my belief that I take no notice of advertising is almost certainly wrong-I see so many messages during a day that some of them are bound to stick and then pop up the next time I need to buy a pair of trainers.
The strongest chapters relate to the treatment of workers in sweatshops in various parts of the world. I knew that such operations existed but I had not appreciated the extent of their reach. This book proved to me that I have bought goods manufactured by someone who is living on payment well below minimum wage, working long hours, often in unsafe conditions. That has made me stop to think about what I will buy and from where in future.
Having awakened my awareness I was disappointed that the book did not tell me what to do with it. I would have welcomed some positive suggestions for making different choices when shopping, or details of how to lobby for change. I was also unclear as to Naomi Klein's view regarding violent direct action. I felt that she was uncritical of some actions taken by protestors, for example in the May Day riots, and it would have helped me to understand her perspective, and that of the protestors, if she had stuck her neck out a little more. I would also have appreciated a more historical context to the detail e.g. an explanation of how the textile industry has developed in the UK via sweatshops, unionisation etc. in such a way as to lead many clothing retailers to source products in, say, Macau (using the example that I am wearing at the moment), rather than Yorkshire. Does this mean that we haven't moved on from the portrayal of the textile industry in the sitcom "Brass" and still all that matters to us is the cheapest price and the highest profit? If so, why?
I have made the book sound like a worthy tome and in some respects it is. I am surprised by how many people I have seen reading it on the Tube. What I have learnt from "No Logo" is that we value individuality and want to do the right thing as long as we don't stand out from the crowd or have to pay too much! The big brands can capitalise on those conflicting desires to sell more products that are pretty much the same as each other using the flattery of advertising to convince us that only we are worthy of them. This book has taught me not to be quite so easily duped. Now all I need is another book to tell me how to shop ethically!
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49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A relevant take on contemporary society, 7 Nov 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs (Paperback)
No Logo is packed with mind-blowing facts about a culture most of us accept as part of our daily life. This book made a real impression upon me - quite an achievement as I'm a dedicated consumer and had been greatly unimpressed with what I'd seen of the anti-globalisation movement.
This book encompasses many themes and for me it offers a modern take on issues of censorship and inequalities of sex, race and class. I was amazed at how many areas of our lives brand-building infiltrates and attempts to control. The strategies used by global companies are fascinating and it is unnerving to recognise yourself as the subject of sophisticated manipulation.
Klein's is not a balanced approach, but then she clearly sees no room for excuses in this moral manifesto. It makes for an engaging read as you can really sense her passion and anger. Stylistically the book owes more to quality journalism than dry academia. The No Logo website is worth a look too!
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking but a too long, 21 May 2004
By A Customer
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This review is from: No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs (Paperback)
This is clearly a key text for many, and it is very thought provoking still now in 2004, I first read it in 2001 - the case studies and views of some appaling acts by the multi-nationals using export processing zones are delivered in a solid manner, with some thorough research and backing. However there is a "but"... the book is far too long and heavy, once you have read half, you really won't gain much more by reading it all, it is the same thing repeated over again with different cases, making it harder to read as time progresses. By 3/4s in it becomes a chore to read. However this is a text rather than a roll-along book, and I still believe everyone should read it once.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A heartfelt and earnest work, though possibly too long & heavy on the rhetoric, 16 Jun 2011
By 
S. Meadows (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No Logo (Paperback)
First of all, it has to be noted that I read the 10th anniversary edition, and cannot compare to the original edition, published in 2000. The book looks at the rise of brands and the way they have taken over various aspects of modern life. It is split into 4 sections:

No Space - where certain brands have attempted to make themselves ubiquitous, pushing competition to the margin
No Choice - where the companies behind the brands have gone out of their way to try and protect their brand and ensure that consumers have few alternatives to choose from
No Jobs - the impact on job security, conditions and the outsourcing of jobs to export processing zones (EPZs)
No Logo - a bit of a hodge-podge of topics, but broadly looking at the rise of anti-globalisation movements.

The book is surprisingly trans-atlantic. One trepidation I felt in picking the book up was that it was primarily a critique of north american corporate practices. And though this is true, it did not feel like I was reading about an alien culture. I suspect this, in and of itself, may be evidence of the kind of globalised culture that Klein is criticising.

The book does go into some depth on its topics, with plenty of references for further explanation on some key areas covered (e.g. The McLibel trial) which gives the book tremendous credibility. It is, however, also littered with emotively loaded adjectives, which made me a little uncomfortable, as it did not feel that I was always reading a balanced account. Later in the book, Klein describes the time she spent talking to sweatshop workers in one of these EPZs and from here it is clear where the emotional heart of her anger has come.

The book makes a compelling case for the anti-globalisation movement, with a due recognition (albeit only at the very end of the book) that this has, on occasions, led to unnecessary violence - a feature which seems to be more evident in the years since the book was first written. One thing is not is a resource pack for activists; Klein never tells the reader what to do or who to boycott. Rather, she shines a light (or maybe an X-ray) onto certain brands and leaves it to the reader's conscience as to what action they are to take.

One drawback of the book is that the level of detail included means that the page count is pretty high. Personally, I think the case could have been well made enough in a 300 page book, rather than the roughly 500 page volume (almost a tome, but not quite) we now have. For that reason, though I didn't skip any of it, I did think on more than one occasion "OK, Naomi, you've made your point. Now please stop beating me over the head with extra examples." The sad thing is, though, the book could probably have been twice as long and still not dealt with every pertinent issue.

10 years on, some things have changed, but No Logo is still relevant as portal through which to see the vacuity of global brands.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely blown away...can't put the book down!, 13 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: No Logo (Paperback)
This book uncovers some problems in society not unveiled through public media. I am absolutely blown away with example after example of corporate America focusing solely on private profit over people and society. If you want to get a feeling of the voice that will be loud and clear for years to come, this is it...
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Multinationals take note, 24 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs (Paperback)
The book is an excellent example of people power. How activists can take a stand against the take over of our towns, lives etc. by the multinationals who are exploiting workers all over the world. In answer to one review, those who buy from the Internet do not need companies to use sweatshop labour to maintain a level of product standard! Companies do not have to pollute or exploit for you to know their product is on the market! If you think it is okay to pay workers $2 (workers are on the breadline) for a 16-hour day to make shoes you are selling for $130 in the US than don't read this book. NO LOGO is intelligently written and carefully researched. Although I do agree with other reviewers that the publishers probably gave Ms Klein too high a word count thus forcing the 'padding'. There can be trade without exploitation, animal cruelty and taking over educational establishments and public space, Ms Klein advocates Government intervention in the form of laws (Self imposed 'codes of conduct' are not going to work, too many companies are 'green washed' already) to enforce ethical practices for the labour force and in the work place. If you are worried about the march of globalisation read this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be compulsory reading in today's society, 17 Jan 2009
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This review is from: No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs (Paperback)
A shocking and lively book designed to stir both thought and emotion in the Western reader. It details all that is wrong with globalisation and corporate power, brings to life the tireless yet often unseen operations fighting back, and mercilessly sets out the dreadful treatment of workers being exploited by many of our most well-known brands.

In terms of these corporations and global companies, Klein unapologetically explores the very darkest depths of their capitalist mentality. She names and shames several huge brands, including Nike, Nestle, Disney, Microsoft, Wal-mart, McDonalds and Gap, and frequently refers back to these examples to illustrate her points in a recognisable context.

Another of her tactics, well-used to provoke reaction throughout the book, is to provide the reader with detailed case studies, and accompanying analysis, of some of the more heinous scandals linked to various companies over the years. From strikes by humiliated teenage workers at McDonalds to compulsory pregnancy testing and the sacking of pregnant workers in poor factories, this is really explicit and shocking material. One example that will never leave my mind is that of the death of many young female workers, mostly teenagers, in a poor foreign garment sweatshop. The girls were locked into the factory all day, with no comforts and no safety measures in place. When a bundle of flammable material caught fire, the whole factory went up. The workers had no escape route and died, some in the fire itself and some, tragically, by throwing themselves from the windows to avoid being slowly burned alive.

Alongside these horrors, Klein explores the anti-globalisation politics in the world, as well as the pitiful, hypocritical means used by the brands to try and claw back their popular image. She visits worker unions and help centres trying to liberate sweatshop workers. She looks at boycotts and consumer power in changing the way brands conduct business. Movements such as `Reclaim the Streets' - a disruptive street-blocking festival scene - and `Culture Jamming' - the art of reworking and altering adverts on the streets in order to change their political meaning drastically - are also described in detail.

Whilst it is terribly frustrating to read about the evasive tactics used by companies - moving factories, issuing `ethical' ad campaigns and avoiding monitoring - the final message is one of hope, empowerment and a need for education. A brilliant and eye-opening book that I wouldn't hesitate to recommend to anyone who is feeling disillusioned with all-dominating brands and capitalist values in today's turbulent and morally questionable society.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars READ this Book!, 3 Jan 2001
This review is from: No Logo (Paperback)
This is an excellent well written well argued book where Naomi Klein links the production of goods in the export processing zones (EPZs)of countries like China, The Philippines, Inodonesia and Vietnem to the methods of promoting these goods in the usa and europe. The EPZs are basically areas in the host countries that are given over to manufacturers, these manufacturers typically pay no taxes and are exempt from labour laws but receive protection of the police and the military, in case the poorly paid workforce organasies,demands union rights or does anything at all to protest the pitiful wages they receive. It is one horror story after another, the main thing that stuck in my mind was the young teenage girls saying all they wanted was short enough hours and enough pay to be able to go to school at night. The owners of these factories are not the big brand names them selves, the brands work purely by outsourcing to them thus disassociating themselves and also giving them the optiopn to outsource to any of the companies operating from EPZs from up to 70 countries, thsi level of competion keeps cost mega low, cost savings which are hardly passed onto the comsumer, when workers were shown prices of $150 trainers from Nikes stores in the usa they were understanderable shocked. Klein also explores how these sky high prices are maintained in the west from tales of how us schools have stooped so low that in selling out to corporations that they will actually have class discussions on how to advertise burger king and force children to watch adverts at certain points in the day to the well documented accounts of how much sports stars are paid to endorse these goods. I could go on all day, but it's better to read Naomi Klein herself.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Synthesis, Sometimes Lacked Focus, 27 July 2001
By 
H. Callaghan "Alice in Wonderland" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs (Paperback)
It's not necessarily untrue that No Logo is The Female Eunuch for the 21st century - both books do an admirable job of pointing up political and social problems, but both are similarly cursed in that they have no real workable ideas for social and political change.
There was a certain element of redundancy in the book, but some of the observations made were astonishing. One is left with a feeling of horror at the human rights abuses which seem to underpin the entire clothing industry, amongst others. But sometimes her sniping at some chains seemed to be based solely on the fact that they had a brand. For instance, the Body Shop is lumped in with Nike but other than darkly citing that they'd been subject to "investigations" no real evidence was produced against them. Funnily enough, the same is also true of McDonald's supposed environmental abuses. In the case of Shell's complicity in the execution of Ken Saro-Wiwa, no discussion of the actual events surrounding his arrest or trial takes place - he was tried for murder - so one is forced to take the notion that he was unjustly accused on faith. I'm sure he was unjustly accused, but nevertheless, this could have done with clarifying.
That said, even if you don't agree with its tenets, it's still an interesting book and has an ambitious theme. Worth four stars, in any case.
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39 of 47 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful, but not seminal, 4 April 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs (Paperback)
I am a cog in the system Ms Klein deconstructs in “No Logo”. As a consultant, I have worked for some of the companies named in book. As a consumer, I have purchased their wares. My introductory economics training provides me with tools to understand, and justify, the flight of manufacturing jobs to low-cost locations. I view anti-globalization protesters as hodgepodge group with no common ideology except a streak of angry anarchism.
Does this book change everything?
No, but it will give you the opportunity to pause and think. To think about the ubiquity of branded goods and their underlying significance (or lack thereof). To think about the omnipresence of advertising and how passively we absorb it on a daily basis (Huxley’s soma?). To think about the growing role of multinationals and our increasing reliance on their “self-regulation” to respect basic human rights.
While “No Logo” is rich in anecdotes and criticism, it rarely discusses some of the benefits of the system (e.g. accountability of brands, technology transfer to low-cost locations) and it is short on potential solutions to the issues raised.
Will I join the next anti-WTO march after reading this book? No, but I will think twice before walking around like a living billboard with a brand emblazoned across my chest. I will be more curious about multinationals' real motives. I will also be more demanding and critical of our political representatives' role in balancing the power of corporations.
In that sense, “No Logo” is useful.
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No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs
No Logo: No Space. No Choice. No Jobs by Naomi Klein (Paperback - 15 Jan 2001)
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