Customer Reviews


23 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (7)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb finale to the manifold series!
In the three books in the manifold series Stephen baxter attempts to explain the 'Fermi paradox'. For those not in the know, the Fermi pardox states that the universe has been around for so long now that intelligent life has had plenty of time to develope but if it had it would be here by now!. In the first book 'Time' the story starts in a universe where life only...
Published on 15 Sept. 2001 by Craig McFarlane

versus
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Possible SPOLIER alert
Great book. I thought the first two in the series were fantastic, but this book didn't quite have the same 'ring' about it. Hoho. Still, great story which luckily held my attention. Although it may not for other lovers of hard Sci-Fi.
I am left feeling gutted. It almost feels like Baxter got a little bored near the end, or annoyed.
It's not fair. If there...
Published on 19 Mar. 2003 by jimmyace


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb finale to the manifold series!, 15 Sept. 2001
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Hardcover)
In the three books in the manifold series Stephen baxter attempts to explain the 'Fermi paradox'. For those not in the know, the Fermi pardox states that the universe has been around for so long now that intelligent life has had plenty of time to develope but if it had it would be here by now!. In the first book 'Time' the story starts in a universe where life only exists on Earth. The second and perhaps weekest book in the series 'Space' has all the same characters as the first and even starts at the same time the first book started but this time the story is set in an alternate universe where life is everywhere. Now in 'Origon' the final book in the 'Manifold' series Stephen Baxter has set a compromise where life is everywhere and only on Earth, to explain how this is possible would give away too much plot. Origon starts with the moon dissapearing and being replaced by a new red moon thriving with life. Once again our hero 'Reid Malenfant' has to convince NASA to build a 'big dumb booster' rocket to get him into space and explore this new moon. What Malenfant doesn't tell them is that he has an alternate motive to get to the moon - his wife Emma is up there, teleported by a blue ring that magically appeared over South Africa. This is a gripping finale to the manifold series never slowing down to let you catch your breath. Time was a great read, Space tailed off a little but Origon has more than made uo for that it is a superb book - If you haven'tread it yet go out and get it now! And then read everything else that Stephen Baxter has written!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Possible SPOLIER alert, 19 Mar. 2003
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Paperback)
Great book. I thought the first two in the series were fantastic, but this book didn't quite have the same 'ring' about it. Hoho. Still, great story which luckily held my attention. Although it may not for other lovers of hard Sci-Fi.
I am left feeling gutted. It almost feels like Baxter got a little bored near the end, or annoyed.
It's not fair. If there weren’t an infinite number of universes I'd be even more upset.
Part of me wishes I'd stopped at the second book... Although I doubt I, nor anyone who enjoyed the first two, would have been able to do that.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting SF treatment of our "alien" ancestors, 7 Nov. 2002
By 
Ben Henley (London, Greater London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Paperback)
This is hard science fiction (ie, Baxter knows what he's talking about). It throws modern protagonists into an environment where they are confronted with Neanderthals, australopithecines and other human ancestors, including previously unknown species invented by Baxter. What's particularly impressive is Baxter's vision of the psychology of the almost-humans - speculative, but highly convincing. Themes of alternative history and a (silly but enjoyable) theory of human origins are also dealt with. The writing is good, and the characterisation is fair.
This is part of the Manifold sequence of books - I recommend you read 'Space' before you read this (and perhaps 'Time', although it's not so good) but it's not essential. They feature the same characters in alternate timelines. This works well, and is not a way to pad out a novel to saga length!
There aren't many authors writing 'proper' SF at the moment. That said, you don't need to be an expert in science to enjoy this. If you are interested in human evolution, you will find it an extremely enjoyable piece of speculation!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars GENIUS!!, 1 Oct. 2002
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Paperback)
In the three books in the manifold series Stephen baxter attempts to explain the 'Fermi paradox'.
For those not in the know, the Fermi pardox states that the universe has been around for so long now that intelligent life has had plenty of time to develop but if it had it would be here by now!.
In the first book 'Time' the story starts in a universe where life exists only on Earth. The second and perhaps weekest book in the series 'Space' has all the same characters as the first and even starts at the same time the first book started but this time the story is set in an alternate universe where life is everywhere. Now in 'Origin' the final book in the 'Manifold' series Stephen Baxter has set a compromise where life is everywhere and only on Earth, to explain how this is possible would give away too much plot.
Origin starts with the moon disapearing and being replaced by a new red moon thriving with life. Once again our hero 'Reid Malenfant' has to convince NASA to build a 'big dumb booster' rocket to get him into space and explore this new moon. What Malenfant doesn't tell them is that he has an alternate motive to get to the moon - his wife Emma is up there, teleported by a blue ring that magically appeared over South Africa.
This is a gripping finale to the manifold series never slowing down to let you catch your breath. Time was a great read, Space tailed off a little but Origin has more than made uo for that. It is a superb book - If you haven't read it yet go out and get it now! And then read everything else that Stephen Baxter has written!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some good ideas, but a disappointing sequel., 3 Sept. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Paperback)
I found first two books in the trilogy, Time and Space, excellent, and I had been looking forward to the release of Origin in paperback so that I could afford it! Both these books contained incredible concepts which nevertheless seemed to be well backed up with scientific theory (such as the very detailed description of the evolution of the galaxy in Time) but just as importantly they showed a deep understanding of human history that made the human side of the plot very believable, and hence very enjoyable.
However, I found Origin infuriatingly lacking in both of these. There were some 'big ideas', but even these were not as wide in scope as those found in the previous two books. In fact, I found that the 'climax' was little more than a rehashing of ideas fully developed in the other books, with some passages quoted almost verbatim. The beginning of the book was excellent, what I had come to expect from Baxter, but the main body of the book was a discussion of the 'society' of various hominids which, while interesting at first, became less so after a while. I was particularly annoyed at the way in which Baxter ended Shadow's story: a fairly major story thread which I had expected to join up with the others at the climax was instead unceremoniously terminated for no good reason. Likewise, the final destinies of Malenfant and Nemoto seemed unsatisfactory.
The first 100 pages of Origin would get 5 stars, easily, but the rest of the book was decidedly disappointing. Baxter can do better than this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Another amazing book from the very talented Stephen Baxter !, 6 Aug. 2001
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Hardcover)
I think that Origin is a book many have been waiting for after the success of the amazing prequels : Time and Space. Origin is the third and last one of the Manifold series, and once again, you are in contact with the same characters, in another universe. The action kicks right from the first pages of the book, while the familiar Blue Wheel appears in the Earth sky, taking Emma away onto this new Red Moon which has replaced our old grey Moon. That is to say, you're very quickly thrilled by the plot and want to finish the book as soon as possible to unravel all mysteries ! The description of all these different kind of hominids on the Red Moon by Baxter is really amazing, and it surely shows you the right place of Homo Sapiens Sapiens in the plurality of hominid races...till the end where you understand its true place in the Universe ! Yet Origin is not as vertiginous as Time or Space, pretty much different, especially because there is less cosmological hard science in it. You'll find more biology science. As for the conclusion, which is very satisfying, you won't be as amazed as in Time or Space, because the reader already holds most of the keys to this final conclusion. Anyway, it's very worth reading, and you won't get bored a slighest moment, Baxter knows how to satisfy his reader ! And the description and psychology of the encountered characters is very good, since you can feel yourself attached to many of these supposedly "inferior" hominids, which after all are not as inferior as many would think. This book is maybe a good lesson of humility and of acceptance of different species, different minds than yours, and for sure broadens your mind, as any great SF book should do ! Once again, congratulations Mister Baxter.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Of the origins, 20 April 2008
By 
Mikko Saari (Tampere, Finland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Paperback)
Manifold is a series of three books. They're not a sequence, actually, as they describe parallel universes. The main character are the same, but the world they live in is different. Origin presents us a world where the good old Moon is replaced by a large red moon. As it happens, the main character, Reid Malenfant, loses his wife Emma on the new moon and has to rescue her.

Emma finds the new moon inhabited by various hominid species. Baxter offers us an interesting view to the life of different hominids, with a point of view of the hominids themselves and humans living with them. It's interesting, but it can also get slightly tedious - this is one long-winded book, with a plot that's a framework for all sorts of neat stuff Baxter wants to present.

But it works, for me at least, because even though I began reading book with some doubts, I soon got sucked into the events. It gets quite interesting and Baxter has some pretty wild ideas there. This book isn't for everybody (that is easy to see from the Amazon reviews, many of which give just one or two stars), but if you enjoyed the other Manifold books, this one is worth reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Such a disappointment, 15 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Hardcover)
The first two novels in the Manifold trilogy are mind-stretching examples of hard SF - this final volume is dull and rather nasty in places.
Malenfant is relegated to a fairly minor character, in character development if not in actual words. Nemoto, a fascinating character from SPACE, is reduced to a simple inscrutable explanation machine - there's nothing she doesn't know and can spend a couple of pages delivering an idiot's guide to.
I so wanted to like Origin, but it doesn't even come close to the brilliance of the first two.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear, its all gone a bit wrong..., 22 Aug. 2004
By 
Mr. K. J. Santi (South England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Paperback)
I was eagerly awaiting this book, and upon reading it I was very disappointed.
It starts like his previous two books in the trilogy were written - a high concept and original sci-fi story, but then it goes totaly in a different direction.
I found myself plodding through a jumble of stories focussed on the social and cultural goings-on of a group of very uninteresting characters. I would estimate that about 75% of the book is irrelevant to the final outcome, which is itself quite interesting.
It felt like the author had run out of ideas and was padding the book until the last few pages where he could deliver the climax of the trilogy.
I feel somewhat cheated, but the killer problem here is that you have to read this book in order to close off the unanswered questions from the first two books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars A disappointing end to the Manifold series, 8 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Origin (Manifold) (Hardcover)
The first two books in the Manifold series were superb (Time and Space); this last in the series is just not in the same class. Reid Malenfant only appears sporadically and the book is dominated by quite grisly details of our early hominid ancestors. Where Space and Time were uplifting, this is most definitely a depressing read. I have enjoyed all of the Stephen Baxter books so far, so am not prejudiced in any way. I suppose we all have bad days.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Origin (Manifold)
Origin (Manifold) by Stephen Baxter (Paperback - 9 Sept. 2011)
£14.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews