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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No sinking feeling here
The fourth in Laurie King's series featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, this one returns to Dartmoor, the setting of the classic Sir Arthur Conan Doyle novel, 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'. And, like in its predecessor there are tales of a ghostly hound out on the moors, this time accompanying an equally ghostly carriage.
This series are always well worth a...
Published on 10 Mar 2001 by Amazon Customer

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well written, but exceedingly slow story
The Moor, another adventure of Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes by Laurie King, gets off to a slow start and never really picks up. The writing is flawless (King's talent in this regard is exceptional)but the story consists almost entirely of Holmes and Russell walking the Moor and finding nothing. While the Moor itself may be the focal point of the book, it's...
Published on 18 July 1999


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No sinking feeling here, 10 Mar 2001
The fourth in Laurie King's series featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, this one returns to Dartmoor, the setting of the classic Sir Arthur Conan Doyle novel, 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'. And, like in its predecessor there are tales of a ghostly hound out on the moors, this time accompanying an equally ghostly carriage.
This series are always well worth a read. Laurie King brings carries off three significant tricks, each alone being worth the price of admission: characterisation of her leads, local and contemporary colour, and a great plot.
In terms of the first, both Holmes and Russell are depicted as somewhat prickly characters, unwilling to suffer fools gladly, and each with their own areas of interest and expertise. Russell works well by herself, but sparks of all kinds fly when her husband is around (being narrated by Russell, we never see Holmes by himself). In this book, the Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould also features strongly, and occasionally view with the leads for our attention. Given he is virtually bedridden, this is no small feat.
The depiction of different kinds of characters and their environments helps bring the story to life. Between those who live on the moor and those who live in the village, lords of the manor and their servants and so forth, we have no opportunity to mistake where and when the book is set. Two scenes which didn't really advance the plot but were wonderful are Russell's meeting with the local witch (as the moor dwellers call her), Elizabeth Chase, and a scene set in the pub where the locals spend the evening singing to entertain themselves - with its attendant rivalry between those who live in the village and those who live on the moor.
Russell's growing understanding of the moor as a place and a presence in the life of its inhabitants also works very well.
And lastly the plot: it's a cracker! I'm not going to give anything more away, but the final outcome was not what I had expected at the beginning of the book.
In summary: what are you waiting for?
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Newest Russell/Holmes adventure a mystery lover's delight, 23 Dec 1997
By A Customer
For those who worried that Laurie King was losing her touch, and that the once-sparkling partnership of Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes was in danger of becoming dull, worry no more. THE MOOR, despite its superficially derivative premise, is a fresh, original, and thoroughly engaging mystery featuring Russell and Holmes at their intellectual and investigative best. King has done her homework here and it shows -- she not only shows the reader the brooding vistas of Dartmoor, she transports them there.
Also not to be missed is the eccentric, prickly, but always fascinating character of the Rev. Sabine Baring-Gould, a real individual in more ways than one. Again King's scrupulous research comes into play here, as she weaves fact and fiction into a seamless whole.
Many of King's former weaknesses in crafting a mystery -- such as failing to introduce us to the villain until the very end of the story -- have been diligently amended here; and, as always, there are enough tips of the hat to (and, occasionally, sly but affectionate pokes at) the Conan-Doyle "canon" to tickle the fancy of Sherlockians. Holmes is at his ascerbic, brilliant best, and Russell shows a human, fallible side that makes her all the more likeable in the end.

This is, in my opinion, the best Russell book since THE BEEKEEPER'S APPRENTICE, and more than worth the price of admission.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Holmes returns to the moor with his wife to solve a mystery, 5 Feb 2006
By 
F. Orion Pozo "Orion Pozo" (Raleigh, NC USA) - See all my reviews
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In The Moor by Laurie R. King, her fourth pairing of Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes, the author has the husband and wife team return to the moors made famous in Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles. This time they are summoned by the eccentric scholar Sabine Baring-Gould to explore some mysterious occurrences which includes two deaths and the appearance of a ghostly coach which is accompanied by a hellish hound with one glowing eye.
Laurie King claims in her Editor's Preface that these stories were found in a trunk that was mysteriously left at her front door. Purportedly the notes of the real Mary Russell, this story is set in 1924. Each chapter is introduced with a quote from one of Baring-Gould's many works.
Russell has her hands full with the aging and sexist Baring-Gould who has a close relationship with Holmes. The problems of a woman in male society are well portrayed, and she eventually wins the respect of the elderly scholar. It is a long story that is rich in local characters and legends. By the time of this novel Holmes and Russell have settled into a comfortable relationship based on mutual respect and the main dynamics are between them and the people of the moor.
A well-written tale with lots of atmosphere that will appeal to the historic mystery buff.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful read, for King and Holmes afficionados, 13 Jan 2001
By A Customer
Leave all your preconceptions behind if you are a Conan Doyle fan and enter Laurie King's interpretation of Sherlock Holmes' new career as partner to Mary Russell. This is a superb series of novels to which I hesitate to refer to as pastiche. Each novel in the series, of which THE MOOR is the fourth, is self contained and absorbs the reader immediately. Having first discovered King through her modern day series of novels featuring Kate Martinelli, I hesitated before staring the Russell/Holmes serires, having not been a reader of the ouvre. However, hooked from the beginning, I can thoroughly recommend both the series, which begins with THE BEEKEEPERS APPRENTICE, and THE MOOR in particular, which bears homage to Coan Doyles' work, but also bears the singularly successful hallmark of Laurie King. Recognition is highly deserved. This is one of the USA's best kept secrets and past titles are already difficult to come by in their UK editions. If you like genuine mystery with wonderful prose and story-telling - discover now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hounding the Baskervilles, 21 Nov 2011
By 
J. Scott-mandeville "jackie veronica" (UK) - See all my reviews
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Laurie R. King has founded a whole genre writing new Sherlock Holmes mysteries with a female protagonist in the lead. To contrive fictions on fiction, renew and maintain the original fictional style, and invent cracking new stories, is no mean feat, and the Mary Russell series is to be highly commended as entertaining novels with clever nuances which always stay just the right side of parody or pastiche.

The Moor is no exception to the rather brilliant inventions Laurie King brings to each of Mary Russell's escapades with her hero husband, Sherlock Holmes. Detective stories with a difference, each book sparkles with wit, perception, expertise in story, style, and sensibility, acute eye for detail, and an electric personal touch in the relationship between Holmes and his wife, 30 years his junior, the intelligent, intellectual, dynamic, eclectic, fascinating Mary Russell.

I recommend The Moor as I recommend all the Mary Russell books. Anyone who has ever enjoyed a detective novel, and/or who has a secret penchant for Sherlock Holmes, will love them all.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well written, but exceedingly slow story, 18 July 1999
By A Customer
The Moor, another adventure of Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes by Laurie King, gets off to a slow start and never really picks up. The writing is flawless (King's talent in this regard is exceptional)but the story consists almost entirely of Holmes and Russell walking the Moor and finding nothing. While the Moor itself may be the focal point of the book, it's hardly enough to sustain real interest for mystery fans. This has been an entertaining series to date, but to continue in that vein, King must deliver exciting stories to accompany the mood and settings of turn of the century Britain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant local descriptions, clever pastiche, weak storylin, 11 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This book features Sherlock Holmes in his late 50s, and his godfather, Revd Sabine Baring-Gould, a real person who lived in Devonshire, England from 1834-1924. The story takes place in 1923, a few weeks before Baring-Gould's death. Mary Russell, the narrator, is married to Holmes, and they have both been summoned to Dartmoor to solve a murder mystery. The story itself is weak, and requires knowledge of 'the Hound of the Baskervilles' for a full appreciation. This is compensated for, however, by the wonderfully vivid and realistic descriptions of Dartmoor, and Lew House, where Baring-Gould lived. As someone who grew up a few miles from this spot, I can vouch for the absolute accuracy of the setting. Laurie King has also read just about all of Baring-Gould's 150 books, and quotes delightfully from many of them. The skill of the book lies in the imaginative conjunction of a fictional and a real character, and for any reader with knowledge of either man, the result is very pleasing. As a lifelong afficionado of Sabine Baring-Gould, I am most indebted to King for bringing him into greater prominence.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars feminist escapes the great grimpen mire, 18 Jan 1998
By A Customer
In Laurie King's excellent new addition to her popular BeeKeeper's Apprentice series, Holmes and his wife, the intrepid Mary Russell, return to the Devonshire Moors, home of the Baskervilles and numerous ghastly legends. They help out Sabine Baring-Gould (a true British eccentric in the most Monty Python sense) and bond further. King takes a lovely scholarly approach to her mysteries, much admired in this less than literate age, although her details are more Sayer-like than Doyle-esque. I still have a little trouble with Holmes as a love god, but maybe in the next book, Mary can elope with Lord Peter Whimsy. Here's hoping!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 1 Oct 2013
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Again, i really do enjoy this series of books, can re read them over and over too, i recommend it
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4.0 out of 5 stars Well written, enjoyable Holmes pastiche, 29 Jan 2012
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Cat (London) - See all my reviews
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I read Beekeeper's Apprentice with some apprehension as authors picking up historical detectives and producing follow-on series is seldom convincing, but Laurie King has produced an impressive effort. By using Mary Russell as the key narrator King has subtly altered the emphasis of the books away from Holmes. The Moor is well written, the story in true Conan Doyle style and I can recommend it as an interesting read.
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The Moor (Mary Russell Mystery 4)
The Moor (Mary Russell Mystery 4) by Laurie R. King (Mass Market Paperback - 10 Dec 2010)
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