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5.0 out of 5 stars wolves of time 2
I am very happy with the book and it is in very good condition and i look forward to reading it
Published 6 months ago by caroline

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Marginal improvement over Vol 1.
The story of the Wolves moves on, in a slightly easier read than the first volume. But I have to say that if hadn't been for the fact that I know that Horwood is usually an excellent writer, I wouldn't have bothered with this novel. Definitely a disappointment compared to his other works, and no mystery to me why it was condensed into two as opposed to three volumes.
Published on 22 Mar 2000


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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Marginal improvement over Vol 1., 22 Mar 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
The story of the Wolves moves on, in a slightly easier read than the first volume. But I have to say that if hadn't been for the fact that I know that Horwood is usually an excellent writer, I wouldn't have bothered with this novel. Definitely a disappointment compared to his other works, and no mystery to me why it was condensed into two as opposed to three volumes.
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5.0 out of 5 stars wolves of time 2, 29 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
I am very happy with the book and it is in very good condition and i look forward to reading it
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4.0 out of 5 stars Different, 12 Feb 2014
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This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
This is the second part of an extraordinary story viewed from the aspect of the wolves. As I happen to think wolves are beautiful intelligent and loyal creatures then this was just right for me. Shades of fantasy and folk-lore intermingled, very readable if you like this genre.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Engaging read, 26 Jun 2011
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Mark P. (Plymouth England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
I really enjoyed reading about the wolves and got as attached to them as I would to human characters in other good books. I think the story was rather spoiled by the human involvement which seemed to be very disjointed and not so well thought out. I rather felt that the ending focused too much on the humans who were really only in the story as a sideline and only detracted from the story. I usually read pure fantasy but will definitely try some of his other books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely wonderful, 28 Jan 2011
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This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
I have just finished reading 'The Wolves of Time' books one and two, and I can say they are the best books I have ever read. The description of the lives and adventures of these magnificant creatures was supurb. The mythological aspect of the story just made it more wonderful. I will never think of wolves again in the same way.
Joyce Taylor
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good book, but rushed, 12 Dec 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
this is a thought-provoking series, not only about the backdrop of mankinds decline, but the characters are explored more thouroughly than in any of his previous works. the first volume is a very patient book, which may cause problems for those who want something to pick up and rush through it in a couple of days, but most of william horwood's books are like that. second volume had promise, but there wasn't enough room to squeeze the third book in there as well, which led to a very rushed ending... But i think if it had been a trilogy it would have been much better and more paced.
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5.0 out of 5 stars i even loved the way they talked to each other, 8 Aug 2014
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This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
i read this book after reading the first in the series. made me see the character of wolves in a different perspective, even though it was just a fictional story. i even loved the way they talked to each other. made it all very real.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 24 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
I eagerly awaited the second instalment of Horwood's trilogy, only to find it disappointing, outdated, and in extreme cases offensive. On the plus side it was also combined with some truly superb story telling and the wonderful description and characterisation which I consider to be Horwood's supreme strengths. The book started by being highly offensive to me as a Christian. I realise that Mr. Horwood has decided to follow another faith but to brand me and many others as following a false God and causing most of the ills in the world I find grosely inaccurate. It is true that many problems in this world have been caused by Christians acting in the name of God, as have Muslims, Hindus Jews and just about another other religions' followers you can claim to think of. However, a religious war is a non sequiter and I feel that ny true follower of a religion would find it offensive to be labelled with the few who have misused either their power or their faith for actions which their faith condones ironically in the name of their faith. I am a christian but I have not caused a religious war, or killed, on plan on killing, and try to live a sustainable, people and environmentally friendly life. I feel that it is unfair to place all the ills of the world on Christianity's shoulders, especially when the true meaning of Christianity is the opposite of what Horwood propounds it to be. Secondly, the book in one breath claims to be liberal, "we are all mennen, both men and women, no distinction" or words to that effect, and then continues in the next with women being treated like chatels and sexual objects. The central sections of the book return to the poetry and marvelous story telling of Horwood's other books, and I was very glad that I had soldiered through the first part of the book. However, I realised it had all been for naught upon reaching the final part of the book. A trilogy had been started but only two books written, and the final volume had been squashed into about 50 pages at the end of the book, and I completed my read feeling let down and disappointed for having read through the previous book and most of this, only to reach a conclusion which was not reaaly the end of a saga, but more an apology for not writting the last book. Characters met with ends with no explanation given. How can one character live for about 100 years, disappear for most of it, and then return later with no explanation profered as to how this was so? I found the story telling unconvincing, with characters unceremoniously dumped by the wayside, treated to a few paragraphs when their stories had taken up vast sections of the previous books. Whatever happened to Maladon? Whatever happened to Torne? Their stories had been so important earlier on and I was upset to learn that vitually no time was given to them in the end by way of conclusion. Why had they been introduced if they had no part to play in the story? I do not know why the last book was scrapped, but I feel that it turned a potentially strong book (my earlier critisms aside about the first part of the book, the rest was gripping and exciting as well as beautifully written)into a hurried, untidy and to be true, seemingly pointless work. Why was the last book abandoned?!?
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent conclusion, 22 May 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
Thiis is an excellent conclusion to a brilliant story by Mr Horwood, but just a shame it wasn't a trilogy. Excellent!!
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6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly not very good, 17 Feb 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Wolves of Time (2) - Seekers at the Wulfrock: Seekers at the Wulfrock v. 2 (Paperback)
I rarely give a book a bad review, but I'm sorry to say this deserves an exception. It's not very good. Another reviewer has pointed out two of what I thought were the book's major flaws, a) its bad portrayal of Christianity (of which more later), and b) the fact that it should have been two books. Towards the end, you get the uncomfortable feeling that the half-page paragraphs with headings ('Boy', 'Merrow', 'Boy II', etc.) should have been whole chapters of an entire book.
Referring to the book's bashing of Christianity (calling Christ a 'false god' is pretty provocative) and modern society in general, I really didn't like this. William Horwood is free not to like Christianity and criticise modern society, but his portrayal of them is unremittingly one-sided. The 'back-to-nature' ideals he sets up as the ideal alternative to our modern society have got a heck of a lot of work to do if they are to convince the reader that Horwood really is right, and I don't think he succeeds. I should mention that I've read waaaay too many books that bewail humanity's tendency to spoil the natural world- a fair point to make, but the juxtaposition here of the brilliantly imaginative spiritual world of the wolves and a portrayal of what is supposed to be the real world doesn't really work. One asks us to suspend disbelief in order to believe that wolves can talk. The other asks us to believe that humanity's salvation lies in following the leadership of talking wolves. I'm sure you can see the problem.
I suspect the real problem for me is that I couldn't help but compare this to the brilliant 'Duncton Chronicles'. These were far superior for so many reasons, but two stand out above all. Firstly, because the world of moles described was completely self-contained and didn't really interact with the human world, thus allowing the reader to suspend disbelief and get into the story. Horwood was able to suggest that the world of moles might be like the world of medieval Europe- dominated by faith and cruelty, with religious leaders warring over salvation and damnation. Secondly, because the characters were drawn with real humanity (if you can apply that to moles). One always had the feeling that Horwood ultimately believed in the capacity for salvation within all of them, even the villains. Lucerne and Henbane (from the first Chronicles) could be hideously villainous, but they were also charismatic, and Horwood never ducked out of showing us how they became evil. Huntermann, the villain of the 'Wolves of Time', is simply so cruel and unredeemably nasty he is actually quite boring, the reader is just waiting for him to meet an untimely end. The violence in the Dunction Chronicles could be extreme, but it was leavened by the brilliant passages showing the beauty of love, friendship and spirituality. In this series, Horwood seems obssessed with the notion of incest (it happens with four different sets of characters that I've counted), which might work if it were better written (as it was in the Dunction Chronicles), but here it's just unpleasant. This is the only one of Horwood's books I've ever returned to the library unfinished. Shame.
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