Customer Reviews


32 Reviews
5 star:
 (17)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars They Said It Couldn't Happen
Clancy has been writing the life history of Jack Ryan for many years. With each new book in the series, new aspects of Ryan are displayed, from his own internal doubts about the moral correctness of some of his actions to a dazzling display of competence in each endeavor that he attempts. Here we find Ryan involved, as a first order plot, in an economic war with Japan,...
Published on 3 Sept. 2009 by Patrick Shepherd

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK thriller, but very uneven.
Debt of Honour brings back Jack Ryan as National Security Adviser, just in time for a war between the US and Japan. A breakdown of relations concerning trade threatens to bring economic chaos to Japan. A new Japanese Prime Minister is elected, but is little more than a mouthpiece for an ultra-nationalist businessman who orders an attack on US warships in the Pacific, the...
Published on 25 Feb. 2005 by rasam23


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars They Said It Couldn't Happen, 3 Sept. 2009
By 
Patrick Shepherd "hyperpat" (San Jose, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Clancy has been writing the life history of Jack Ryan for many years. With each new book in the series, new aspects of Ryan are displayed, from his own internal doubts about the moral correctness of some of his actions to a dazzling display of competence in each endeavor that he attempts. Here we find Ryan involved, as a first order plot, in an economic war with Japan, waged with all the tools of modern electronic markets, where Ryan's prior experience as a Wall Street analyst is useful, believable, and comprehensible to the reader. This alone is no small feat for Clancy, as Wall Street jargon is a language all its own, and the internal workings of the markets are mainly a dark mystery to most. Of course, this being a Clancy novel, there is far more than just one main plot, and when things deteriorate to a shooting war, he does his usual fine job of delineating actual tactics, weapons, squad level and executive decisions to the point of making the reader feel that he is there on the front line. The characterization of Yamata, one of the main driving forces on the opposing side, is very well done, and lends a sense of inevitability to the surprising and traumatic conclusion to this book. After reading this, Executive Orders is a must read, if just to find out "Now what?" (and you won't be disappointed, as Executive Orders is as good or maybe slightly better than this one).

There are a few places where I felt Clancy could have been more concise; at times the level of detail he throws at the reader is overwhelming, and not truly necessary to developing his plot, characters, or theme. This is a typical Clancy failing (which seems to have become much worse in his latest couple of novels) -- here it is quite bearable, and it is fairly easy to recognize those sections where it is safe to do some skim reading.

Some readers of this have felt that the depicted scenario is too far out, that this could never happen in the real world. This is not a failure on the author's part, but rather the failure of too limited an imagination on the part of these readers. Events as they have occurred since this book was published in 1994 have, unfortunately, shown just how possible this kind of thing is, if not exactly right in all its details. But it is clear that America can be attacked in many more ways than the traditional military methods, from economics to bio-war to terrorists. How we can maintain our traditional freedoms while nullifying these threats is a continuing question that so far does not have any simple answer.

---Reviewed by Patrick Shepherd (hyperpat)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Pays its debt and more, 20 Oct. 2008
This review is from: Debt Of Honour : (Paperback)
Forgive the cliché, but Tom Clancy is very much the literary equivalent of Marmite - you either love him or hate him. He's not the most gifted wordsmith ever to unleash his talents on a keyboard, and his characters can sometimes make cardboard cut-outs seem deep. But whatever side of the fence you fall on, there's no denying that he knows which way the winds are blowing in the world of politics and military technology. And he puts that knowledge to good use here.

In the wake of the near-miss war in The Sum of All Fears, America and Russia have agreed to dismantle their stocks of nuclear missiles to prevent such a thing from happening again. All good, you may think. Not when other countries are building their own nukes, and have designs on taking over the Western Pacific. Yes, Japan is getting ready for a rematch against world champions America, and this time the gloves are off.

It starts with an attack on the US economy, followed almost immediately by a Pearl Harbour-esque strike that cripples two American aircraft carriers and sinks of a couple of subs. With no effective force to resist them, Japanese forces occupy Pacific islands lost to them after WW2. Now facing economic chaos, a crippled Navy and an entrenched enemy armed with nuclear missiles, it's up to Jack Ryan and a few others to sort things out.

Books like this are pretty much like adventure TV shows that constantly place the hero in peril - you know they're going to get out of it, but the fun part is seeing how they actually manage it. In Debt of Honour's case, the solution is actually pretty inventive, though you can't help feeling that using the all-purpose silver bullet of superior technology is cheating somewhat.

Most authors have an agenda of some kind when they write a book, and Clancy is no exception. It's clear that he's none too pleased with the cutbacks in the US military since the end of the Cold War, and he spends long paragraphs remarking wistfully on how the Navy is but a shadow of its former glory, the Army has been severely downsized and the Air Force all but grounded. Of course, that doesn't stop them stomping all over the Japanese once they're fully mobilised, shooting down scores of enemy fighters while scoffing apple pie and staring dreamy-eyed at the Stars and Stripes fluttering in the breeze.

Oh well, I can't really criticise Clancy for being overly patriotic, since patriotism pretty much lies at the heart of what his books are all about. And since the Japanese behave in such a sneaky and underhanded manner in this book, seeing them get their comeuppance is somewhat akin to watching the aliens from Independence Day fall foul of shoddy virus checkers.

As I said earlier, Clancy knows his military stuff, but he's less competent in the other topics this book tackles. His descriptions of how a capitalist economy works are both clunky and unnecessary, and his characterization is sorely lacking. Nearly everyone is super good at their jobs, and almost never make a wrong decision. The `bad guys' meanwhile are so overconfident that it's practically guaranteed they'll fall foul of their own hubris.

Overall though, I like this book. It's not on par with Hunt for Red October or The Sum of All Fears, but it's a decent and rewarding techno-thriller that really kicks into high gear about half with through. And most readers will notice a rather chilling similarity between the finale and certain real world events that took place six years later.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A meaty read, 2 May 2011
By 
This review is from: Debt Of Honour : (Paperback)
It all depends on what you want. Some stories are fairly superficial and easy to read. Other are meaty and require the reader to concentrate and remember a great many diverse elements. Debt of Honour is such a book. It is the sort of book you need to read several times, each read helping to unravel the depth of the story. It's quality writing well worth the effort.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, But Not His Best., 15 Dec. 2010
By 
Steve (Weymouth, UK) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Debt Of Honour : (Paperback)
The story takes a while to get going, but stick with it because it`s worth the effort as once again Tom Clancy pulls the different strands together to produce a great thriller.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Technically impeccable, spectacular and thrilling., 7 Aug. 2010
By 
This review is from: Debt Of Honour : (Paperback)
Like a proper military operation, nine-tenths of the plot of this novel is preparation, and the remaining tenth is execution. The novel starts off slowly, opening many detailed sub-plots showing off a lot of technical detail about the US economy, CIA, US defence and military hardware. The book alternates between these different sub-plots, some of which are concluded during the novel, while others are woven together in an enjoyable military climax.

This is a "Ryanverse" novel featuring the usual characters from other Clancy novels, such as Ryan, Murray, Clark and Chavez, and also the resurfacing of some submarine officers from "The Hunt for Red October" .

As with many Clancy novels, the story is thought-provoking and semi-educational due to it's philosophical reflection and accurate technical detail. I thoroughly enjoyed it, although was somewhat disappointed with the sensationalist ending, described in the last five pages or so. I felt this to be an unnecessary and far fetched addition to an otherwise plausible novel, although in one sense it was a chilling premonition of a real event that happened just a few years later...

Fortunately the story carries on directly from the aftermath of this disaster in the sequal "Executive Orders", which I am looking forward to reading next.

Like many Clancy novels, this could be scripted into an excellent TV mini-series, but is in my opinion, too long to be made into a feature film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars I enjoyed it, 10 Oct. 2009
By 
This review is from: Debt of Honour (Hardcover)
Having just finished re-reading this one, I throughly enjoyed it, despite what some other reviewers have made of Clancy's story writing.
I agree that putting Japan in the role of the big bad guy is perhaps a little far fetched, but it is scary to think (bearing in mind this was written in 1994) how similar the current financial markets are with his storyline, not forgetting the ending (pre 9/11).
Possible hard to get into for new Clancy readers, but by the last third I could hardly put the book down.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Standard Clancy, 14 July 2007
By 
Geoffrey Webb "Geoff" (Northampton) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Debt Of Honour : (Paperback)
I've read quite a lot of his books and DoH didn't fail to disappoint, the whole setting up of the Japanese as the bad guys was quite convoluted but I suppose that Clancy just fancied writing them as bad guys. There was quite a lot of economics in the book which didn't trouble me but for those who like more military and political action then perhaps this isn't the Clancy book for you.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK thriller, but very uneven., 25 Feb. 2005
This review is from: Debt Of Honour : (Paperback)
Debt of Honour brings back Jack Ryan as National Security Adviser, just in time for a war between the US and Japan. A breakdown of relations concerning trade threatens to bring economic chaos to Japan. A new Japanese Prime Minister is elected, but is little more than a mouthpiece for an ultra-nationalist businessman who orders an attack on US warships in the Pacific, the invasion of the Mariana Islands, and the sabotage of the US economy. However, things aren't about to stop there, as Ryan learns that there's another part to the plan - a joint-Japanese/Chinese invasion of Siberia. The threat of World War III has come back. Will Ryan prevent it? What do you think?
Its more or less Red Storm Rising with Japan as the baddie. The Portagee subplot is similar to what happens with Mike Edwards on Iceland in Red Storm. There's even a Tomahawk attack on airbases.
This book is actually quite an entertaining read, but the pace is wildly uneven. It takes a long time for the plot to develop, then it kicks off big time, then it slows to a snail's pace during the really tedious economic sabotage passages, then kicks off again during some great battles - in the air, on the seas, under the seas, - and just when we think its over, something else happens, leaving us with a terrific cliffhanger of an ending.
Its not brilliant, it has a lot of flaws, but the author manages to make it work. God knows what his editors and publishing agents must have thought though when he pitched the book - "We're going to war against Japan".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read, 20 Jan. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Debt Of Honour : (Paperback)
Tom Clancy at his best. A riveting read. Thoroughly researched and difficult to put down. All in all money well spent and probably worth a second read even though it is around a thousand pages.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Tom Clancy, 1 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Debt of Honor (Audio CD)
Yet another of my absolute Tom Clancy novels which came to pass on 9/11 Let us hope his pen does not dry up vry soon
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Debt Of Honour :
Debt Of Honour : by Tom Clancy (Paperback - 2 Feb. 1998)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews