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4.0 out of 5 stars This far and no further
Contains spoilers.

As with all Cussler's earlier 'Dirk Pitt' adventures (this is the 12th), it helps to suspend your sense of reality somewhat. This is also the last entry in the series which is worth that effort. The setup, involving pre-Columbian civilisations & Francis Drake, albeit rather long, is interesting, detailed and clearly well-researched. The plot...
Published 4 months ago by Robin Monks

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1.0 out of 5 stars Clive Cussler, Inca Gold = Circle a Long-lived Cuss
Contains spoilers for the first 81 pages (6 chapters); I honestly couldn't get any further than that...

Like a Dan Brown FACT page assuring us of his faithful depictions of the artworks/buildings/murderous weirdos he's describing, Clive Cussler starts his 1994 novel Inca Gold with an epigraph concerning the conversion of the US to the metric system in 1997...
Published 14 months ago by Jim Noy


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1.0 out of 5 stars Clive Cussler, Inca Gold = Circle a Long-lived Cuss, 26 Jan. 2014
This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
Contains spoilers for the first 81 pages (6 chapters); I honestly couldn't get any further than that...

Like a Dan Brown FACT page assuring us of his faithful depictions of the artworks/buildings/murderous weirdos he's describing, Clive Cussler starts his 1994 novel Inca Gold with an epigraph concerning the conversion of the US to the metric system in 1997. Then, with the main narrative set in 1998, every single time a metric unit is mentioned in the text he follows it with the approximate imperial equivalent (in parentheses). Couple this with the fact that he subsequently evidently sees no irony in calling a prominent character Miles (and fails to use this opportunity to give him a younger partner who is two-thirds as tall as him and called, I dunno, Kim) and disappointingly misses ample other cross-unit conversions (a 360-degree turn, but not a 2 pi radians one - you're not really trying, are you, Mr. Cussler?) and I think that tells you everything you need to know.

But wait! There's more if you want it. The two - count 'em - prologues are actually reasonably atmospheric, but are preceded by a diagram of an 'Inca Seagoing Vessel' that in appearing as if it was drawn by a seven year-old manages to strip away any semblance of dramatic tension (and lazily it doesn't even match the description of the same vessel on the first page...). In chapter one we are introduced to the only female character to feature for a while by being told that she's 'a very attractive woman when dressed and made up'; I, and I'm sure I'm not alone in this, fellas, was frankly relieved to know that she's not a complete dog! Particularly as - after nearly dying, being kidnapped by pirates (or bandits, whatever), marched through hostile terrain, forced to stand by while her colleague is shot in front of her, and then threatened with rape - she hurls herself at Our Hero and he's able to appreciate the 'sensual lustiness about her' despite her 'damp, stringy hair' and her 'lack of makeup'. What is it with you and the makeup, Clive?

But even this development is undercut by the dramatic reveal that Someone Already Introduced is In On The Evil Scheme; fine, but said person would have been able to tell the Evil Pirates how many people were in the rescue party and so they would have known how many people needed to be rounded up. That such lazy writing allows Our Hero - I daren't use his name as it's a registered trade mark, and having paid for this book I'm reluctant to give Clive Cussler any cause to demand more money out of me - to Escape Undetected and Foil the Evildoers has something almost self-consciously fourth-wall about it, but then a disappearing body and the need for a shower (and, let's really hope, a well-stocked makeup kit) intrudes and we're off again, hip-deep in the disinterested dreck that Cussler peddles to astounding popularity.

Don't get me wrong, I love ridiculous over the top adventure nonsense as much as - more than - next man, and was checking out Cussler to fill the gaps between Matthew Reilly books. I'll make no friends for saying this, as the preponderance of 5-star reviews attests, but this is insulting in so many ways as I hope I've justified above and there's no reason to believe the remaining 538 pages would change that (certainly my skimming ahead didn't reveal anything, besides another female character called Loren who may or may not be attractive without makeup and is probably less than 2 metres (over 6 feet) tall). Genuinely good luck to you if this is your kind of thing, but I certainly won't be back for more.
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4.0 out of 5 stars This far and no further, 24 Nov. 2014
By 
Robin Monks "robinm0" (Glossop, Derbyshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
Contains spoilers.

As with all Cussler's earlier 'Dirk Pitt' adventures (this is the 12th), it helps to suspend your sense of reality somewhat. This is also the last entry in the series which is worth that effort. The setup, involving pre-Columbian civilisations & Francis Drake, albeit rather long, is interesting, detailed and clearly well-researched. The plot flows nicely, making the book very readable, although some characters (mostly the villains) are a little one-dimensional. Our hero manages to maintain his sang-froid in the face of some adverse odds, involving helicopter chases across Peru and Ecuador, terrorists and art thieves. So far, so good.

However, the last few chapters involving Pitt's escape from a underground cavern are the point at which you begin to think that his continuing survival has just gone past the bounds of already stretched credibility. For this reason, I've given 4 rather than 5 stars.

Indeed, after this episode, & having read about several more of Pitt's projects, it is all downhill on the reality front for him and his companions as the scenarios in the books become more and more outlandish, so much less believable. Things only get worse when co-authors are in evidence.

If this kind of Boy's Own adventure story is for you, then all the earlier entries are recommended, as they are also well written. Just don't go beyond this one.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very Good- if a little implausible!, 24 April 2011
By 
A. Laidlaw (England, Cumbria) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
I finished the book last night, and I can say I enjoyed it allot!
The book is very well researched, which is good, as the descriptions of ancient American cultures are very good.
The story itself, is fast paced, and action packed. But it does require some suspense of disbelief, as the main character's (Dirk Pitt's) ability to survive just about anything, does get ridiculous, and you can always be sure that he will be just fine. That said, it's good reading just how he ends up being fine after getting in to all sorts of trouble!
There is one aspect of the book I don't like, and that's the conversions for metric and imperial numbers etc, as whenever it says `20 meters ` it will be accompanied by a `(63 feet)` which when doing descriptions, really ruins the flow of the words, and get's even weirder when it's a character speaking as they will say `20 meters, or 63 feet!`. Somehow, I can't imagine Dirk Pitt would give a running conversion for every measurement he ever made!
That aside, it's a very good book, and I would recommend it to anybody!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inca Gold, 4 Sept. 2002
By A Customer
This is a brilliant book.It is one of Cusslers best books.
There is action and suspense in every chapter a must read book.
Dirk Pitt is a classic action hero and if you enjoy Indiana Jones you are sure to love this book.
Pitts extraordinary adventure leads him to the lost city of the dead and in search of a spanish galleon, washed deep into the jungle by a tidal wave centuries before. He is eventually led to a hord of inca gold. But Pitt will need all his skills to stay alive and find the gold before the greatest prize ever known is lost forever.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A lengthy treasure hunt, 9 Aug. 2009
By 
SonicQuack (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
Inca Gold starts off with a sequence befitting a grand finale. The 150 page opening scene is unlike any other previous Cussler style and sets the scene for an epic treasure hunt. Dirk Pitt and the usual NUMA cast find themselves embroiled in race to unearth the Incan treasure before the shadowy and evil Zolans. It's all typical Cussler - however at some point Pitt has become almost unbreakable. Realism is stretched to a transparent layer as Pitt moves from one escape from death to the next, taking an incredible beating and never stopping. It's entertaining of course and Dirk Pitt fans will lap it up, however Inca Gold isn't the most gripping entry in the series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I Love This Book!, 31 July 2008
This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
Inca Gold was the first Clive Cussler novel I ever read.

From then on I was hooked.

It is one of the great adventure stories (and I'm partial to stories that involve ancient Spanish treasure). Dirk Pitt and Al Giordino are fun characters that work really well together. This book reads at a fast pace, is a real page turner (sleepless nights) and is a cracking adventure tale.

A must read for lovers of this genre.

How To Keep Your Man: And Keep Him For Good

Real Life Dramas - Volume One: 1

Darren G. Burton
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not very good, 22 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
The hero of this book, although I am sure many readers love him, is one of these larger than life boy's own indestructible adventurer types but unfortunately rather one dimensional. I am sure the author wants to be him but I don't. The story is to be honest not bad but so many of the discoveries made are rather ridiculously coincidental I really could not buy into it. And when the author himself then appears in the story... why? This is my first Cussler novel and I was extremely disappointed.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Classic Dirk Pitt Treasure Hunt, 13 Jan. 2015
By 
Lee Hanley (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
This is a classic Dirk Pitt novel with the usual ingredients of an implausible treasure hunt mixed with some very bad guys who want it just as much. Pitt is his usual confident self, using all his skills with a touch of arrogance and in some cases chauvinism. Yet there is also over confidence where he is a bit too cocky and makes a bad miscalculation, putting others in danger. However he endures numerous hardships, which by the way provide some excellent adventure moments.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Inca Gold Paperback, 31 Oct. 2013
By 
L. Brandwood (Wycombe, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Inca Gold (Paperback)
This is a classic Dirk Pitt adventure with load of fast moving and exciting action very difficult to put down. If you have never read a Dirk Pitt adventure before you will want to read more. If you are an existing reader you can easily ignore the repeating information that new readers need to really get into the story. Clive Cussler's work is very adictive.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book worthy of being a Pitt novel, 6 July 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Inca Gold (Audio Cassette)
This is a very well researched book. It features heavily on history & Mr.Cussler has done his home-work well. This Pitt novel is fast paced, colourful, exciting & absorbing. Everything you'd expect from Mr.Pitt & Mr.Giordano is in this book. The witty comments, the lovely ladies, the flash classic cars, the chases, fights whatever you want from a Pitt novel is here.
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Inca Gold
Inca Gold by Clive Cussler (Paperback - 5 Sept. 2005)
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