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16 Reviews
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At least it got me away from the telly!
I was pleasantly surprised by this book. The cover is rather garish, with the words 'pussy' and 'telly' most prominent and I'm not sure I'd give it to my mum for a birthday present, but for 30 something guy like myself, there were lots of moments of recognition and hoots of laughter.
Television is something that, like it or loathe it, brings us all together in shared...
Published on 17 Sep 2001 by dave0003@aol.com

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Annoyingly trendy
Stuart Jeffries can definitely write, but he has written one of those books that is normally published by Routledge with footnotes - a kind of sub sub Roland Barthes analysis of popular culture - which he attempts to enliven with a few jokes and personal anecdotes (a lot of these about farting; you get the picture!).
Published on 2 July 2000


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At least it got me away from the telly!, 17 Sep 2001
I was pleasantly surprised by this book. The cover is rather garish, with the words 'pussy' and 'telly' most prominent and I'm not sure I'd give it to my mum for a birthday present, but for 30 something guy like myself, there were lots of moments of recognition and hoots of laughter.
Television is something that, like it or loathe it, brings us all together in shared memories. On top of that, it's a medium which doesn't often get a serious critical eye cast over it. Jeffries is obviously a clever bloke (the chapter on war coverage was really thought-provoking), but you could imagine having a pint with him too, which makes him good company in this read. Highly recommended!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Annoyingly trendy, 2 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Mrs Slocombe's Pussy (Hardcover)
Stuart Jeffries can definitely write, but he has written one of those books that is normally published by Routledge with footnotes - a kind of sub sub Roland Barthes analysis of popular culture - which he attempts to enliven with a few jokes and personal anecdotes (a lot of these about farting; you get the picture!).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I laughed my head off, 23 May 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Mrs Slocombe's Pussy (Hardcover)
I picked up the paperback of this book at Euston station and it kept my mind off the awful journey to Carlisle by making me laugh my head almost literally off (which would have been alarming for my fellow passengers, and Railtrack sees to alarming passengers much better than I can). Jeffries knows how to tell a joke, and such big portions! I'd recommend this to anyone. Cheers!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Had me shrieking with recognition!, 19 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Mrs Slocombe's Pussy (Hardcover)
Stuart Jeffries book is Ab Fab! It had me shouting out in recognition of long forgotten programmes and names. As a thirtysomething now, I didn't think that tv had so much impact on my childhood...I was wrong! I too grew up in the midlands and watched Crossroads during tea. My Dad & I used to shout out the name of 'Jack Barton' during the credits (Why?...'cause it sounded like Dick Barton of course!). Just his name in print brought it all back! I've also been compelled to watch England play football with the certain knowledge that they'll lose, unable to tear myself away, but hiding behind a cushion so I can't see. Yes, with infinite channels we'll all no doubt switch off, saying that there's nothing on! At that point you should pick up this book and start reading...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All our Yesterdays and then some, 17 Mar 2003
This book certainly brings back memories of some long-forgotten shows and will also make you look at some programmes in a different light. Jeffries writes poigniantly about programmes as varied as Bill and Ben and Brideshead Revisited. His demolition of THE TV News and also Changing Rooms is worth the price of the book alone. Jeffries manages to be funny where appropriate but also hits a sombre note where required. If I have one criticism of this book it is that Jeffries occassionally indulges in academic language and references where it's not required but apart from that a highly readable and enjoyable book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Once upon a time, on a TV station long, long ago..., 23 Mar 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Mrs Slocombe's Pussy (Hardcover)
If you're a forty-something who grew up in Britain durng the Sixties and Seventies, then you really have to read this book. The author will have you wallowing in nostalgia for the days when you ate baked beans on toast in front of "Nationwide" or hooted with laughter when Mr Grainger voiced his desire to takes his elderly wife to Wales - to Bangor (it's all in the enunciation). In addition to the joys of trawling through the archives of our own TV memories there are some sharp observations on the culture of the time.
This is a book which enveloped me in a warm glow and opened my eyes to more than a few double entendres which went over my head at the time. If you can't persuade someone to buy it as a present for you, dig deep and find the cash to buy it yourself - you'll be glad you did.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What an excellent read, 9 Oct 2001
I guess it helped being the same age, but this book took me back to so many fond memories and also many times I found myself exactly on track with the author. The best book I have read this year and a must for anyone who has watched TV in any generation. Superb a classic and will look out for this author in future.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A funny title, 6 April 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
But inside it gives a very serious history of the types of programmes I was brought up on...very funny read and very interesting history....
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I hated this book, 12 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Mrs Slocombe's Pussy (Hardcover)
I have reasonably broad reading tastes, but everything about this book annoyed me. It is pretentious in a media studies way. I have been picking this up and getting annoyed by it for 2 months and have given up. Perhaps I don't watch enough television but if this is what it does to you I'm glad.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Koreans? cruel... The Scottish? worse than the Koreans, 3 Sep 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Mrs Slocombe's Pussy (Hardcover)
After meeting Stuart Jeffries at this year's (2000) Edinburgh Festival, and concluding that he was a bit like me, I bought a copy of his book, which he signed. He'd been reading out the chapter on British sitcoms, an analysis of 'Are You Being Served', which forms the title of the book. I raced through the book in under a week, it is funny, poignant, reflective and written with the clarity, and spirit of inquiry of someone who has studied philosophy. My favourite section is about the last winter Olympic games and first appeared in the Guardian (I remember because I cut it out, it was so funny). The ice skater Nicky Slator is intentionally confused with the highly probable Nicky Skater the ice slator. Ice slating, Jeffries hypothesises, could feasibly be one of the new-that-year olympic sports. A week after I finished the book, the BBC put on a re-run of a 'Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads' episode (which is analysed in the book). I watched with new eyes. This is probably the greatest achievement of the book, it encourages you to watch actively and critically making you appreciate the unwritten cultural subtext to many of yesterdays (and todays) programmes.
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Mrs Slocombe's Pussy
Mrs Slocombe's Pussy by Stuart Jeffries (Hardcover - 7 Feb 2000)
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