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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 7 January 2001
Martin Gilbert has produced a truly superb account of the Holocaust. The book takes the reader through the history of European Jewry,the events leading up to the Holocaust,the rise of anti-Semitism, the ghettos, deportations and death camps which have become synonymous with the Holocaust. The narrative describing the events is vividly brought to life by the personal accounts and recollections of those caught up in various aspects of the Holocaust:a Jew saved by Oskar Schindler, a survivor of Auschwitz and a liberating British soldier. Never Again is comprehensive and thoroughly researched and is an enlightning book on one of mankind's greatest tradgedies.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 28 February 2001
This book is very well set out and covers all aspects of the Holocaust, even areas I had not previously considered. For me there was not enough depth but a complete overview of the subject and having read many books about various aspects of the Holocaust I found this a little frustrating. The first hand evidence and its presentation enhance the book. I would thoroughly recommend this book to someone initially researching the subject but not if you are well read on the subject.
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on 2 January 2014
This book is a superb introduction to the Holocaust, well set out in sections with appropriate photos and maps. It would be an excellent introduction for a student who knows little of these events. If after reading this you want to know more detail, move on to Martin Gilbert's "The Holocaust", his massive and unequalled tome about those horrific times. It is unlikely that any other book will supplant his book as the best source for these events.The Holocaust
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 29 May 2008
In this volume, including many photographs and artwork, Martin Gilbert charts the Nazi mass murder scheme, which they called the Final Solution,
which remains one of history's most despicable acts of inhumanity, callousness, murder and sadism. A new word had to be coined in the English language to describe it- genocide.
Gilbert begins by charting the background of European Jewry and the persecution they suffered.
Gilbert includes a chart of the pre-Second World War Jewish population of the countries in Europe from which Jews were to be murdered during the Holocaust.
They add up to almost 8 million.

Chapter Two charts the rise of Nazi Germany, and the pre-war persecution of the Jews by the Nazis.
It includes an analysis of the Nazi programme concerning the Jews which openly declared the aim of genocide against the Jews of Europe.
In September 1930, as German parliamentarians walked to the Reichstag for it's first session, in which the Nazi Party had it's first significant representation- 107 seats- crowds of Nazi youths cried out as the parliamentarians passed" "Germany wake. Death to the Jews".
This can easily be compared to the declaration of ""Jews! We have already dug your graves," by Hamas official Mushir al-Masri at a half-million strong rally of support for Hamas in Gaza's central square on Saturday, 15 December 2007.
Gilbert discusses the boycott of Jewish businesses by the Nazis, which one is chillingly reminded of when we see anti-Israel pressure groups launching boycotts of Israeli products and concerns today.
He charts the persecution, expulsion and book burning, the anti-Jewish laws passed at Nuremberg in 1935, and Jewish emigration from Germany, the four biggest destinations of refugees from Nazism before World War II, were the United States, Argentina, Britain and Palestine. The chapter covers the German annexation of Austria in 1938 and the 1938 pogroms against Jews across Germany and Austria, on 18 October 1938, known as Kristallnacht.
He also charts the Kindertransport, which one can study in detail in the following book: I came alone: The stories of the Kindertransports wherein more than nine thousand German and Austrian Jewish children- between the ages of three months and seventeen years- were brought to Britain after the Kristallknacht; the voyage of the St Louis, the ship carrying Jewish refugees from Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia, which was turned back by the United States. An estimated 660 of the 930 Jewish refugees who were forced to return to Europe on the St Louis were murdered in the Holocaust; an article on those who helped Jews to escape Europe such as the Dutch woman Gertrude Wijsmuller and Portuguese diplomat Dr Aristides De Sousa Mendes.

Gilbert go's on to document the Jews who escaped from the Nazi death machine to fight alongside the Partisans across Eastern Europe.
He also has an article on the 20 to 30 000 survived the war in hiding. These 'hidden children' were those under the age of fourteen, many of them babies, whose parents managed to find someone- a non Jewish person or family, or a Christian institution- with whom they could live, without their Jewishness becoming known.
Books on more about this subject include Hidden Children

The article on 'Righteous Gentiles' is about the many thousand of non-Jews who risked- and in many cases lost- their own lives to save Jewish lives.

Chapter Seven discusses the Last Year of the War, which discusses Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto uprising of 1944, acts of individual defiance, Anne Frank in hiding, rescuers such as Oskar Schindler and Raoul Wallenberg, the Death Marches, the Death Marches and the Fate of non-Jews such as the 231 800 Gypsies murdered by the Nazis between 1939 and 1945.
The article on the deportation centre at Drancy France, shows the identity card of Anny-Yolande Horowitz, together with her signature and fingerprint.
Anny-Yolande was born in Strasbourg on 2 June 1933 and deported to Auschwitz and murdered in September 1942, three months after her ninth birthday. The registration card, issued at Tours on 4 December 1940, notes that she is Jewish (juive) and that she is under police surveillance as a foreigner although Strasbourg, her birthplace was part of France when she was born.

Another photo of one of the 11 400 French Jewish children who were murdered is of Camille Himelfarb-Sarnacka, born in Paris on 10 June, 1940.
In 12942 she was arrested with her mother in front of the Goncourt metro station in Paris.
On 16 September 1942 she was deported to Auschwitz and murdered there on on reaching the camp.
She was two years and three months old.

The last chapter deals with the Liberation of the Death Camps and some of the survivors such as children like Idel Levitan and Renja From, the homes found by survivors, the war crimes trials and holocaust memorials, the second generation and bearing witness, the lives of the children and grandchildren of holocaust survivors (most of whom live in Israel), and bearing witness.

The last article before the chronology and bibliography is the article 'Never Again' describing the meaning of the cry that Never Again would something like this be allowed to happen.
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on 11 August 2015
Excellent book. Whilst a difficult subject, well written and well referenced
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on 29 March 2015
Very good.
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2 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 7 July 2001
I found that the pictures and the text in this book were very well balanced, and the sections make it easy and comfortable to read.
Its a good book for anyone interested in a general and widespreasd survey of the holocaust.
He doesn't , however, look at some of the more deeper historiographical issues- the Goldhagen debate, and men such as David Irving's views are ignore. To a more accademic reader therefore it is a limited book- it would make a good introduction.
Also his use of language at times shows a bias which is not, I feel, appropriate for an objective historian. He uses the term " murdered " which implies a peacetime act, and that the charge has been officially condemed- whilst it is indeed arguable that this WAS the case, at Neuremberg, he fails to look at this area in enough detail.
Perhaps it could have looked more at the psychology of those involved- it deals more with HOW the holocaust happened than WHY.
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