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43 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Short to Read, Big on Wisdom
I really liked this book, but for the same reasons I liked it, some may hate it.

First of all, it's an easy read, and it gets its points across by telling a story. Other books, such as The Sixty-Second Motivator, have also used this format succesfully, but this style may not appeal to everyone. To me, it makes the book a lot less boring to read...
Published on 6 Jun 2006 by gym rat

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just right for first-time or inexperienced managers.
Its been around for a long time now, and maybe needs an update. It is certainly rather superficial, and you have to like the chatty style. However, its still the best for new or inexperienced team leaders, supervisors (if they still exist!) or first liners. A kind of 'first aid' book. Then go and dig deeper!
Published on 12 Mar 2002


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43 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Short to Read, Big on Wisdom, 6 Jun 2006
I really liked this book, but for the same reasons I liked it, some may hate it.

First of all, it's an easy read, and it gets its points across by telling a story. Other books, such as The Sixty-Second Motivator, have also used this format succesfully, but this style may not appeal to everyone. To me, it makes the book a lot less boring to read.

Secondly, the book is short. The vast majority of readers will easily be able to read this book in a day. It has bigger font, which I personally liked and thought it made it a joy to read. However here again, some may be turned off by that and consider it to be too "child-like."

Thirdly, the book takes solid mangagerial info and gives it to the reader handily in the form of three "secrets." I found the advice to be very practical and while some may consider it far too simple, it can help you a lot IF you actually apply the info- which I suspect most managers do not.

In conclusion, I recommend this short business classic to anyone looking for better ways to improve their managerial skills. I doubt most readers will be disappointed.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for any business adviser, 26 May 2000
By 
Tom Carroll (St Helens England) - See all my reviews
This easy to read book opens the door on a concept of people management hitherto unknown in the table-thumping boardrooms of Smallbusinessville. In not much more than 100 pages, Ken Blanchard shows us that getting the best out of our fellow team members is not about 'showing them who's boss', but has more to do with a system of reward and recognition designed to set goals and help people achieve those goals.
A word of warning! Reading this book may seriously change your attitudes to people management. I have already found its contents to be of real and practical help here in my own professional practice, but above all in my role as a pro-active accountant and business developer.
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42 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful even in the home, 10 Nov 2003
By 
DAVID-LEONARD WILLIS (Thessaloniki Greece) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Is there a short, easy-to-read management book that can be really useful to the businessman but also helpful for the housewife and in the conduct of family affairs? Is it possible to squeeze into 100 pages enough valuable information so that it serves a multiple audience and could even be a guide for raising children? This book is based on techniques occupying one minute. Concentrating on three core issues, the author first concentrates on goals. In the business world goals would probably be getting more bang for the buck or more widgets per shift or greater efficiency; in the home goal setting can start with children making the bed, keeping the bedroom tidy or clearing up afterwards. Goal setting is only successful if both parties buy into it - boss and employee or parent and child. Agreeing on objectives, expressing them concisely as bullet points, and setting a time frame may take more than a minute but they can be reviewed rapidly and without dispute. The other two core issues - praise or reprimand - follow naturally and each party knows in advance what it will be. There are no surprises.
You can easily read this book and map out your strategy in an evening. It is difficult to imagine that anyone could not find this book helpful in some part of their life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The gift of getting greater results in less time, 1 Jun 2009
By 
Nicholas J. R. Dougan "Nick Dougan" (Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
First published in 1982, The One Minute Manager is just 106 pages long, and many of those pages are short blocks of text or motto-like summaries of ideas - in a form that one might put on a plaque on your desk.

The books tells the story of a young aspiring manager, searching for enlightenment about the best way of managing people, who comes across "the special manager" and who learns from him and his colleagues the three secrets of successful management. These are One Minute Goals, One Minute Praisings and One Minute Reprimands. The anecdotal style is clear and simple; I liked it, although some might think its simplicity verges on the patronising. It might come across as patronising if delivered ineptly, too, although any good idea will fail if implemented poorly. The authors seem to recommend telling everyone in your organisation exactly what it is you are doing (I am sure they would be delighted if you bought all your reports a copy of the book!) but, alternatively, if deployed with a modicum of intelligence and situational awareness, these techniques could be used successfully without anyone being aware of it.

The catchy "one minute" title of the book and many others in this series may give the impression that the authors think that effective interaction between people can be reduced down to one minute segments. Some of the recurrent themes in the book may reinforce this, for example the special manager's intense dislike of having to repeat himself leading to the first "one minute reprimand" of the young manager. A coaching style of leadership and management should allow for some repetition for clarity, reinforcement and a host of other reasons. To be fair, however, I don't think that that was Blanchard and Johnson's intention - in many cases much thought and planning would have to go into achieving short, sharp interactions. A One Minute Goal, for example, is a one page statement of a (significant) goal, written on just one side of paper and capable of being read in just one minute. Anyone who has tried this type of formal delegation knows that it can take a long time to distil a host of complicated factors down into such a format.

This is yet another of those books that I wish I had read many years ago. While I think that many experienced and effective managers will recognise much of the way they work in the one-minute style, like so many great or inspirational books this one achieves clarity through simplicity. As Winston Churchill once put it, "out of intense complexities intense simplicities emerge". I believe Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson have achieved that objective.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An essential read, 5 Jun 2002
By A Customer
OK, so this book is not the definitive guide to management, but reading it is guaranteed to change the way you think. I have no hesitation recommending this to anyone who wants to re-examine the way they manage people.
It may not suit everyone and it may not have all the answers, but I learned more from the hour-or-so it took me to read this book than on a seven day management course I attended recently.
It debunks the myth that management has to be hard, or that you can only be a nice guy or a 'company' guy. You can be both.
The main reason people criticise this book is not because the book is bad, but trying to force everyone to use this (or any single) method can never work. And do you really believe a book that bad would sell millions of copies?
And the 5 or so I spent on this book has already helped me get my 10k+ pay rise and promotion this year. That's value for money. Read this. You owe it to yourself.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The lessons learnt in this book are still with me, 21 Mar 2003
By 
Mr. GF Settle (Cheshire,UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
I can't remember when I read this book and who if anyone recommended it to me but the images and lessons learnt are still very clear.
The calmness of the main character, who is always in control, mentors you page after page with key messages. I always carry a calming image in my mind especially when things get tough at work of visiting the ‘one minute’ manager in his office. I walk through his open door and he turns away from gazing out of the window deep in thought to welcome me and offer advice.
Another of the key thoughts I retain and practice is when disciplining staff you tell them what they haven’t done so well and what you expect from them BUT you leave them with the thought that you know and have seen them do really good work and that is what you want to see them continue to do.
It’s a bit like the STICK and CARROT approach. They leave in a positive frame of mind knowing what is expected of them and knowing that you have faith in their ability to perform and have your support but equally they know the consequences if they do not.
I have found that by adopting this approach I have got very good performances out of my staff and they have felt that they can approach me about any issue. For the rest of the time they have had the confidence to proceed knowing that I will back their judgement.
As one of the previous reviewers has said if you like this book you will love when the ‘One minute Manager Meets the Monkey’ is all about what to do with that problem that’s been put on your back and which you can do sweet FA about. But hey I’m not going to tell you about it in this review.
Also look out for ‘Who moved my Cheese’ the author inspired one of his co-authors to write about how to deal with change. If you are in a rut get this book as well, non of them will cost you much and they are all bite size and fit nicely into you pocket or handbag.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple, easy subtle above all inspirational!, 8 Dec 2005
Delivering great employee performance is quite a skill, some might say an art. You could do far worse than to invest in this great little book, which is a delightful read…
In this early book from Ken Blanchard, he is able, through a very precise focus on what makes leaders (and, I think in this case, managers), get the very best from those they employ, to describe a simple process for success.
For many, 'The One Minute Manager' is a revelation and I have no doubt that it works. In my long management career, I was able to achieve this goal eventually, but it is, inevitably, easier to read than deliver. This is because, like most things, it requires practice and focus. And if any manager were able to do these things easily, they would be already.
That being said, it's a great aspirational (and inspirational) book, focused on delivering, through people, great success in business and organisations.
Rather than trying to do it all yourself and either failing, or burning yourself out in the process (tried it myself - once!). Because of that, it is a very useful read for anyone who wants to make management a career.
As a business coach, I especially like the simplicity of The One Minute Manager, a feature I have included often in the ideas and tips on my own website.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Universally applicable!, 31 Aug 2006
By 
B. V. Michael - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is one of my favorite books. It is geniusly simple, respectful and powerful. I was surprised to find out that I can easily apply the 3 principles in almost every relationship. So many people around deserve to be praised and taught a lesson and it is very important HOW you will do it because the final result can be very positive or just the opposite. It is a very valuable book which is very well written and is a fast read. I also highly recommend the other books from the One Minute Manager series because every book has a lot to offer and they will be especially helpful if you are in a business environment.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but very light on content, 26 Jan 2007
This is a good, fast paced read. It can be read in about an hour. It contains very basic people management skills information, wrapped into a story. The basis of the story is that there is a manager who can restrict his contact with colleagues to one minute bursts and be the most effective manager in the organisation. A newcomer learns the skills and represents the reader in the story. Most managers you know have read this book, so if you have not, buy it and read it tomorrow - must keep up with the competition!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Just right for first-time or inexperienced managers., 12 Mar 2002
By A Customer
Its been around for a long time now, and maybe needs an update. It is certainly rather superficial, and you have to like the chatty style. However, its still the best for new or inexperienced team leaders, supervisors (if they still exist!) or first liners. A kind of 'first aid' book. Then go and dig deeper!
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The One Minute Manager
The One Minute Manager by Spencer Johnson (Paperback - 24 Mar 1983)
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