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Wagner: Die Walküre
 
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Wagner: Die Walküre

14 May 2012 | Format: MP3

£25.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £20.42 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:16
30
2
3:25
30
3
6:14
30
4
3:39
30
5
5:54
30
6
2:45
30
7
3:29
30
8
4:56
30
9
6:06
30
10
6:37
30
11
5:48
30
12
1:32
30
13
3:15
30
14
2:17
30
15
5:31
30
16
1:25
30
17
4:19
Disc 2
30
1
2:23
30
2
2:58
30
3
3:51
30
4
4:14
30
5
6:04
30
6
2:45
30
7
3:20
30
8
5:25
30
9
5:14
30
10
6:17
30
11
4:52
30
12
4:18
30
13
3:40
30
14
4:15
30
15
4:19
30
16
4:15
Disc 3
30
1
4:38
30
2
5:46
30
3
2:29
30
4
2:22
30
5
5:05
30
6
2:41
30
7
2:00
30
8
3:09
30
9
2:48
Disc 4
30
1
9:24
30
2
3:34
30
3
2:25
30
4
4:22
30
5
4:09
30
6
5:14
30
7
3:45
30
8
2:19
30
9
4:01
30
10
5:20
30
11
4:04
30
12
2:02
30
13
1:13
30
14
2:50
30
15
3:11
30
16
5:29
30
17
7:16
30
18
2:16
30
19
4:24
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 14 May 2012
  • Release Date: 14 May 2012
  • Number of Discs: 4
  • Label: Halle Concerts Society
  • Copyright: (c) 2012 Hallé Concerts Society
  • Total Length: 4:07:54
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0084T9FUK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 327,709 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Delius on 15 Jun. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Sir Mark Elder developed as an opera conductor in London in the late 1970's and through the 1980's, particularly at ENO, where Reginald Goodall's presence was still very evident. Goodall `s various Wagner recordings (Tristan, Meistersinger, Parsifal and Ring) show his predilection for slow tempos, yet with deep understanding of the drama expressed through a great sense of line, and a detailed but organic approach..... often achieved, it is true, through many rehearsals.

I recall an Elder Flying Dutchman at ENO from the early 80's which, if fallible memory isn't playing tricks, exhibited generally faster tempi and a greater initial drive than we have here. Yet whilst some of that sheer pace may not be so present in his recent work (including the previously released Gotterdammerung) , there is no loss of impetus and direction. A mellowing of tempi, and yet a palpable sense of theatre, indicate adoption of at least some of his great predecessors characteristics.

What does this mean in practice? Well, Walkure opens with a storm - both meteorological and emotional. For those used to the powerful, thrusting approach of say Bohm, Solti (or Levine live) there may be disappointment here. Elder is more measured....yet the turmoil is still there. As Act 1 unfolds (coming in at around 71 mins) Elder is not averse to lingering here and there to emphasise the desolation of Siegmund's plight and his growing relationship with Sieglinde, revelling in the sheer beauty of the writing. Indeed I haven't appreciated this aspect of the score so clearly for a long time (and I own many Walkures!!)....yet....there is still the sense of line moving forward. The structure does not collapse and desiccate.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By ziggy_fan TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 May 2012
Format: Audio CD
I was there when this was performed, live at the Bridgewater Hall, in the Manchester International Festival. It was electrifying then, and I am excited to say that the recording has done that performance absolute justice. Indeed, it brings a different dimension because the performance was semi staged (in that the cast sang their parts to the audience and acted in interactions with each other to some extent, but as in a concert setting, the orchestra was behind them and often the main event in interludes, preludes etc) with very atmospheric lighting and surtitles projected on both sides of the stage. The recording's additional dimension is that the music leaps out from the speakers and into your mind's eye making Wagner's mythological world of the Valkyrie into something quite tangible. I had goose bumps from the start to the finish, while listening to the recording, especially ends of act 1 and 2. The rapturous applause at the end of each act and at the conclusion of the opera, says it all. People (including myself) were giving standing ovations all around and all levels of the wonderful concert hall, at the end of each of the 3 sections.

If you haven't got a recording of this opera, then start with this, you won't regret it.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Cerddor o Gymru on 21 May 2012
Format: Audio CD
This is not a studio recording, nor is it a live staged performance. It is a recording of the concerts given in Manchester's Bridgewater Hall last July. There are so many advantages that flow from this: there is more precision than you would normally get from a stage recording, yet there is still the electricity of a real occasion. And the concert set-up allows the engineers to achieve a near-perfect balance between forces.
Mark Elder is doing great things in Manchester. The Hallé has had some lean times in the years since the death of Barbirolli. Sir Mark's goals are long-term ones, yet rich musical rewards are already clearly to be heard. Expressive, beautiful and disciplined playing from every orchestral section, with all details inflected in a thoroughly stylish way.
The vocal soloists may not all be 'starry' names; but they each bring something special to their roles. Stig Anderson and Yvonne Howard have the youthful quality that is needed for the incestuous twins Siegmund and Sielglinde - supple, fresh voices. Clive Bayley's Hunding is not as heavy a voice as we're used to; yet he still manages to convey powerfully the thuggish menace of the warrior. The first Act thus works superbly, the contrasts between the tension of Hunding's scenes and the growing passion of those of the lovers captured thrillingly.
The Ride of the Valkyries, though it of course leads a popular life as a concert item, is not necessarily the bit you look forward to most if you're a Wagner lover. Yet here, I have to say "Wow and thrice Wow!!!". Elder brings out the colours and the momentum of the music superbly, without forcing the pace or the volume, and the team of female warrior-maidens make a stirring noise!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aeschylus on 16 July 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I often return to Mark Elders recording in English of Verdi's Otello made around thirty years ago. I purchased his Halle Gotterdammerung last year and was really thrilled. Now with this Walkure he surely joins the ranks of operatic elder statesmen.
First, the recorded quality is simply superb and together with Elders' deliberate pacing allows so much detail to emerge, those "inner voices" that so often elude recordings. Now for the human voices. The Siegmund, Anderson, is in good voice and together with Sieglinde brings out much of the sexual imagery of the score. Clive Bayleys'Hunding is superbly sung in a slightly lighter tione than we maybe used to. Susan Bullock's Brunnhilde starts out as a high spirited girl ever ready to do her father's bidding and then she meets true humankind and quickly grows up. In the third Act she is truly impassioned and matches Martha Modl in the her final outburst from "was hast du erdacht das ich erdulde?" Made the hairs on my neck stand on end!
Wotan is a god who suffered the all to human failing of ordering something, Walhall, that he could not afford. Thus our Latvian singer opens in thoughtful mood and grows as decisions beyond his powers are thrust upon him. The Sophoclean parallel that you cannot escape fate vividly realised. Really great stuff in the third act. Fricka is also excellent and a team of Vakyries that includes Linda Finnie (Bayreuths Fricka in the mid eighties to early nineties) you can be sure is in fine form. I can't remember if it was GBS or Newman who described the climax of the Walkurenritt "as all eight valkyries sit chorusing in savage joy". This is exactly what they do in this recording. All concerned in this issue are to be heartily congratulated. If my Lotto ticket yields the jackpot, look no further for funding the remaining operas.
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