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Turn It Over (Bonus Tracks Edition)
 
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Turn It Over (Bonus Tracks Edition)

14 Mar. 2011 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £10.52 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:21
30
2
2:55
30
3
3:44
30
4
2:44
30
5
1:50
30
6
5:09
30
7
4:57
30
8
4:10
30
9
4:35
30
10
3:47
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan. 2011
  • Release Date: 14 Mar. 2011
  • Label: UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)
  • Copyright: (C) 2011 Universal Music Operations Ltd.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 38:12
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004Q6QI5U
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 76,152 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Bolton on 25 Nov. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is an album that is very much of its time. Most of the group had done a stint with Mile Davis, and it shows both in style and tone. This album and Davis's 'Jack Johnson' were both recorded in 1970 and have in common John McLaughlin whose guitar work highlights the similar overall feel of the albums. Both are vey hard and edgy, both sit in the jazz/rock fusion genre, in 1970 both were very new and very different. But this album is much more in your face than Jack Johnson, it starts hard and stays relentless for the entire album. This is not an album that you can put on and ignore, it demands your attention, partly because it is heavily rythm driven and short on melody and partly because as the sleeve notes tell you, it is best played LOUD. Additionally it features some very abrupt mood shifts that can easily throw the listener off balance.

The quality of the musicianship is beyond question, all four of the group are on top form. As you might expect from the group's name the drums are further up the mix than is common but given how good Tony Williams is I can live with that though it does somewhat penalise Jack Bruce. McLaughlin and Larry Young are both outstanding.

Pretty well the only real fault with this album is the quality of Tony Williams' vocals on 'This Night This Song' and 'Once I Loved'. Basically he just isn't a great vocalist and given that Jack Bruce was in the band it would have been better to let him do all the vocals rather than just 'One World'.

One problem with the original vinyl recording was that the high level of the recording started to distort badly on anything other than the very best equipment.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bodhi Heeren TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 2 Nov. 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is an exploration of both inner and outer space by one of the best bands ever. John McLaughlin's aciddrenched guitar, pointing forward to his psychedelic classic "Devotion", the other-worldly organ of Larry Young and the driving, restless and bombastic drumming of maestro Tony Williams. Add to this bass-master Jack Bruce on a couple of tracks and you got this most wonderful combination of "Bitches Brew" and Cream, when they were best. Some of the most uncompromising and adventurous music ever on record.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard House on 7 Oct. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I'm a very biased unreconstructed Mahavishnu nut, but this is an unmissable feast of visceral virtuoso vulcanism that's probably never been repeated before or since - for its emotional impact, it makes Napalm Death or Extreme Noise Terror sound like James Last. It's probably the nearest thing you'll find to John's other-universe playing on his iconic 'Devotion' - some of the lines he finds take one straight to the Divine - God surely did (and does?) play through him. Tony Williams leaves Bonham et al. needing to go back to their drum tutors. And Larry Young... - so sad that neither are still with us - but John at age 71 is still doing exhausting world tours - an amazing phenomenon. Bruce's vocals on 'One World' are magnificent; and the album is so extraordinary that IT JUST DOESN'T MATTER that Tony can't sing and John hits one particularly bum note - it just proves how authentic and faithful this music is - thank heaven it hasn't been over-produced out of existence. Simply incendiary. Get it.
Richard House
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Neil Mawer on 6 Oct. 2014
Format: Audio CD
The Good News is that this is the best remaster yet from the classic proto jazz rock masters, so from that point of view is a must have, and it does have the fantastic 45 only release One Word with one of Jack Bruce's best ever vocals.

Now the down side:-

1. The B Side Two Worlds is not on the CD ( the 45 version has never been issued on CD, and trounces the re-done Ego version)
2. The complete original double LP version of Turn It Over was remixed by Bill Laswell in 1999, but has never seen the light of day. It features both new & extended tracks, including a barnstorming Williams/Bruce bass/drums duet.

So still a very good album, but inferior to the 1969 Emergency set (especially the Phillip Schaap remix) The Laswell full length mix is every bit the equal of Emergency and this would have been the ideal opportunity to issue it.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By therealus TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 9 Feb. 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Hell! This is loud! Even with the sound turned right down the intensity is such that you worry about the neighbours. Mostly the sonic attack is good; just occasionally it seems gratuitous, as on the opening track when the band repeat the same lick for what seems an eternity - it's a bit like a wanton child, seeing how long he can sustain the naughtiness before retribution strikes.

Born at a time when supergroups were the in thing, Lifetime look like the jazz-rock equivalent of Blind Faith, complete with ex-Cream bassist Jack Bruce where Blind Faith took Clapton and Ginger Baker. From a personal point of view I prefer John McLaughlin's guitar to Clapton's, but there are no singers to match Clapton's blues or Steve Winwood's soul, so the tracks where Lifetime burst into song are possibly best consigned to experience. This is nowhere so true as on One Word, where Jack Bruce attempts to emulate the instruments in progressing through the scale from low register to high, but is unable to pull it off. Four years later, McLaughlin revived a part of the tune as Resolution, on Mahavishnu Orchestra's Birds Of Fire album, but with Jerry Goodman's violin substituting for the vocals to much better effect.

With the band's sound augmented by Larry Young's organ, there are times when I thought of The Nice when listening to the album - not a bad thing in my book. It's a superficial thing, but also in keeping with the times as there were plenty of bands around at the time which relied on the Hammond for muscle (Deep Purple, Colloseum, and Keith Emerson's post-Nice supergroup ELP). That means that, although it took me forty years to get round to Turn It Over I feel a sense of nostalgia in listening to it.
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