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I Am Divine 2014

4.9 out of 5 stars (29) IMDb 7.7/10

Who wants to die for art? The ultimate outsider turned underground royalty, I Am Divine is a biographical portrait charting the legendary icon's rise to infamy as a cult superstar.

Starring:
Divine, Michael Musto
Runtime:
1 hour, 29 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Jeffrey Schwarz
Starring Divine, Michael Musto
Supporting actors Mark Payne, Greg Gorman, Mink Stole, John Waters, Vincent Peranio, Frances Milstead, Diana Evans, Dennis Dermody, Pat Moran, Susan Lowe, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Alonso Duralde, Pam Tent, Fayette Hauser, Bill Bowers, Dolores Deluce, Van Smith
Studio Peccadillo Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
A first rate documentary of Divine. It involves all those close to him both professionally and personally and uses a lot of television and radio interviews to get his own opinions of his situation. What comes across is a rather misunderstood man. His public persona - as so often with the wilder performance artists - was quite at odds with the person he was when he was alone or on a one to one basis.

He says quite often in the documentary that the on stage character was a way to earn a living. Once off stage he never dressed up. Echos of Dame Edna really. He felt the only way he could get on the stage or in front of a camera was to be his alter ego Divine. He had no qualms about ditching the role if a straight acting role come up and he never turned up for film previews in costume.

His mother comes across quite well in the documentary and he eventually made up with his parents. The eating disorder he had caused him a lot of problems on and off stage and it wasn't easy giving his all under the hot lights in heavy make up and costume while dragging 300 lbs around with him. The food obsession was a bit frightening though.

As Kenny Everett would say 'It's all done in the best possible taste!'
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Format: DVD
This is an excellent look at the life of one of the most interesting and underrated men in showbusiness. For the die-hard fan it is a chance to relive some of the best performances and lines that will remind you why you love Divine so much. For the uninitiated it will surely tempt you to dive into his work and find out for yourself what made him such an interesting phenomenon.

I think the film does him justice. It highlights how deeply he touched those who knew him and how much they loved and respected him. It's such a shame he didn't live longer and taste the mainstream success that was surely coming his way. At least this movie captures his essence and passes it on to future generations.
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By schumann_bg TOP 50 REVIEWER on 14 Sept. 2014
Format: DVD
Divine, who in one of her roles called herself the most beautiful woman in the world, stood out in all settings, and the look was perfected to a rare degree. What this marvellous documentary shows is how it came into being and was then transformed, under the guidance of John Waters' star, largely, although not exclusively. It was he who released what he saw as the 'anger' in Divine, who had been a quiet boy from the same neighbourhood, painfully aware of being overweight and very bullied at school. Divine's initial attempts at finding a drag persona were along more conventional lines of what was considered attractive, but he soon hit on the idea of wearing outfits that no girl that size would dare to wear, and this became his signature from early on. The first John Waters films, with names like Multiple Maniacs and Eat Your Makeup, were perfect for Divine, who was invited out to an underground cinema in San Francisco and welcomed like a star. After this he seemed to have the confidence to launch himself in full-length colour features by Waters such as Pink Flamingos and Female Trouble. He then moved towards more endearing roles in Polyester and Hairspray, embarked on a raunchy pop career in disco wearing the most outrageous outfits on stage, and made a final appearance in Lust In The Dust by Paul Bartel.

What comes across here is not only how reserved Divine was in private, but how fondly he was thought of by co-stars and friends. As Glenn Milstead he could hardly have been more different from the blowsy but compelling screen presence, that hinted at this gentleness nonetheless.
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By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Sept. 2014
Format: DVD
After being beaten up /tormented/tortured at school for being odd, Glen shaped his attitude to the world. Later having a heterosexual romance for six years, he gradually sneaked out his persona. Glen finally segued into Divine through John Water's tuition. Firstly he composed the world in his head and then let loose a punk anarchistic attack upon traditional family values. To be so honest, he had to have had a great deal of suppressed anger. And this, like his father, this insight is what was missing within the film. Glen did not just grow up to be Divine as some form of genetic script, he willed it. And what he willed was to pour his body fluids over the sham pretences within standard families. This is where John and Glen connect.

So the early films Diane Linkletter, Mondo Trasho are crude sorties against the moral crusaders. Later John became more sophisticated within his class and aesthetic revolution. Glenn also altered.

What comes out of the film is Glenn's lust for power and craving to be accepted. Cast into some schmaltzy TV show in the late 80's he would have ended up cruising to the other polarity of his personality, the desire to be normal but accepted as odd. This is what drove him.

In the meantime however, there is the greatest romp upon US family values this side of the Simpsons and Family Guy as Divine was the precursor to unpicking the Waltons and the Reagan love in; the moral majority. His portrayal of dysfunction is spellbinding as he tears into the normal and leaves it as shattered pieces of belief.

Towards the end he made friends with his mum and so much his ire became dissipated as it was her approval he sought and this was why he ended up becoming less "out there.
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