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Schindler's List 1994 Subtitles

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Winner of 7 Oscars including Best Picture, Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List follows the true story of Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson), who saved more than 1,100 Jews during the Holocaust.

Starring:
Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley
Runtime:
3 hours, 15 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama, Historical
Director Steven Spielberg
Starring Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley
Supporting actors Ralph Fiennes, Caroline Goodall, Jonathan Sagall, Embeth Davidtz, Malgorzata Gebel, Shmuel Levy, Mark Ivanir, Béatrice Macola, Andrzej Seweryn, Friedrich von Thun, Krzysztof Luft, Harry Nehring, Norbert Weisser, Adi Nitzan, Michael Schneider, Miri Fabian, Anna Mucha, Albert Misak
Studio Universal Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Even though Steven Spielberg had made some of the most successful -- and profitable -- films in movie history (E.T.: The Extraterrestrial, Jaws, the Indiana Jones series), he was always perceived as a master craftsman but never as a "serious" director capable of making a grown-up film. This is an odd perception, considering that in addition to such crowd-pleasers as Raiders of the Lost Ark and E.T. (along with the plethora of projects he has been involved with as executive producer -- Who Framed Roger Rabbit? and the Back to the Future trilogy), Spielberg had directed such serious fare as 1985's The Color Purple and 1987's Empire of the Sun, which deal with such weighty topics as race and the effect of war on children.
One film, released in late 1993 -- the same year that Jurassic Park set worldwide box office records -- changed that perception forever: Schindler's List.
Based on the true story of Oskar Schindler, a German philanderer, member of the Nazi Party, and war profiteer whose desire to make money from Hitler's European war slowly but irrevocably morphed into a desire to save over a thousand of his Jewish labor force from the Nazis' genocidal "Final Solution," Schindler's List is a powerfully moving film. It not only never flinches from the inhumanity of Hitler's willing executioners -- there are all sorts of terrible things going on in here, including torture, manhunts, mass executions, and random acts of cruelty -- but it also touches on the central belief felt by Spielberg himself that decency and righteousness can triumph over even the most implacable tyranny and hatred.
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Format: DVD
Thomas Keneally's bestselling book was made into a movie of awesome power and emotional impact. Oskar Schindler was a Catholic war profiteer during World War II. He initially prospered because he went along with the Nazi regime and did not challenge it. But Schindler ultimately saved the lives of more than 1,000 Polish Jews by giving them jobs in his factory, which turned out crockery for the German army. Schindler lost his wealth, but gained salvation for many lives and the descendants that would spring from those lives.
Like Raging Bull and Rumblefish, this film is shot in black and white which accentuates the impact whenever there is the odd colour scene as in the end with the girl in the red coat after liberation of the prisoners. Despite the movie's considerable length, it is never slow or dull. It is hard to believe that Hollywood, which so often churns out mindless drivel aimed at making money, could produce something so important and powerful as this film.

Much credit is due to the three main actors -- Liam Neeson as Schindler, Ben Kingsley as his Jewish accountant (and, on occasion, Schindler's conscience), and Ralph Fiennes as the frightening Nazi commandant. The film won seven Oscars, but its best accomplishment may be reminding us that we must never forget what happened.
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Format: VHS Tape
Schindler's List: A Review
'Schindler's List' may be set in the Second World War but it isn't yet another gung-ho action 'Saving Private Ryan' type film. In fact, it is a wonderfully crafted documentary style piece, whose moving imagery, technical mastery and understated dialogue combine to deliver a very moving and powerful presentation of the terrible inhuman atrocities of the Holocaust.
Growing up in peacetime, in a relatively liberal country, it is hard to fully understand the horrors and discrimination that happened during the Second World War, but Schindler's List is a film that leaves us in no doubt about the scale of human suffering that occurred. The film concentrates on the true story of Oskar Schindler, a Nazi Polish businessman initially interested only in capitalizing on the circumstances by using cheap Jewish labour from the Ghetto. By the end of the film, he is transformed into a hero who lost his fortune to save over a thousand persecuted Jews and defraud the Nazis.
Liam Neeson is superb as Oskar Schindler. His immense physical stature reflects the importance of the character. He handles the change of character from businessman to humanitarian with great restraint and control so when he finally allows Schindler open emotion at the end the impact is overwhelmingly powerful.
Ben Kingsley gives a brilliant performance as Itzhak Stern, a clever Jewish accountant hired by Schindler to run his factory. Stern uses his position to employ and protect many of his fellow Jews. When Schindler finds out, he is at first disappointed but eventually actively instructs Stern to do the things that he would have frowned upon earlier. Stern recognizes Schindler's humanity and the relationship that grows between them develops subtly.
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Format: DVD
Important note - this review is of the boxed set contents for this limited edition release of Schindler's List and not for the film itself, which is an absolutely essential buy.
The boxed set really adds nothing to the standard release of Schindler's List on DVD, which is beautifully packaged and has some interesting extras. On top of this standard release you also get:
Soundtrack of the CD - John Williams' excellent score is strong enough to be listened to aside from the film but can be found separately and doesn't justify the additional cost.
A book containing stills from the movie - whilst the book is beautifully produced and the stills are evocative, the question has to be - what is the point? The images within the book mean far more as part of the movie itself. A more sensible approach would surely have been to produce a book containing real documentary evidence of the Holocaust.
A "limited edition" stenotype of a scene from the film - one of Universal's favourite extras in their limited edition DVD releases. Everybody gets the same film still, and the number on the back of mine was 188843, which suggests the limited edition isn't particularly limited. This sort of thing only has any value if it is genuinely scarce.
A "certificate of authenticity" - somewhat tackily containing a quote from Roger Ebert about the film, moderate quality printing on thin paper. Very cheap indeed.
It's a shame that a film as important as Schindler's List receives the same treatment from Universal's marketing department as usual and this boxed set is definitely not worth the extra money that you'll pay over the price of the standard release which, ironically, does show genuine effort having been made to match the product to the quality of the film within.
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