Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Berberian Sound Studio 2012

Amazon Instant Video

(72) IMDb 6.2/10
Watch Trailer

A sound engineer's work for an Italian horror studio becomes a terrifying case of life imitating art.

Starring:
Toby Jones,Antonio Mancino
Runtime:
1 hour, 32 minutes

Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Horror
Director Peter Strickland
Starring Toby Jones, Antonio Mancino
Supporting actors Guido Adorni
Studio Artificial Aye
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. Brookes on 19 Oct. 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This is a strange film and a pretty decent horror to boot. An English sound engineer travels to Italy to work on a disturbing horror movie. He doesn't realise it's a horror film he's working on until he gets there and finds himself being drawn into the violence that he's recreating.

The film is well paced with a gradual ramping up of tension and towards the end it gets gets very strange. As well as being an entertaining story it's also an interesting watch. His job is to recreate the sounds of various nasty scenes, the techniques he uses to achieve these make for an interesting watch in themselves.

Another aspect I enjoyed was the lack of shock or visual horror, apart from a few glimpses it's all in the audio and not in a surprise fashion, in places it is downright creepy, which always get's my vote! In summary this is a decent horror watch, and something a little different from the usual tropes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. Booth on 7 Mar. 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
As someone who is a big fan of horror, and British, Im always interested in new British horror films. This film caught my attention because it is set aganist a backdrop of 70s Italian gore horror, referencing the style of directors like Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, both of whom I really like. The story is about a talented English sound engineer, with no experience of horror films, who is employed to work on a very gory horror film being made in italy, by an increasingly sinister team, and the experience of creating sounds for such extreme horror, acts of torture (which we only hear, we never see) leads to a growing sense of dread and unease, culminating in a gradual breaking down of his sanity. But much of the film is about the importance and the power of sound itself. It is not a gory film, and not really a horror film, but it is very disconcerting, chilling, and gripping. It is brilliantly concieved, with excellent acting and strking art direction, beautifully directed, and as much a mediation of the nature of sound itself. Shades of David Lynch too. I loved it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 19 Mar. 2014
Format: Blu-ray
It’s hard to think of a more desperately disappointing recent film than Peter Strickland’s Berberian Sound Studio, which, on the one hand, is well acted and directed but unfortunately wastes its unusual setting and potential to create something genuinely unnerving. The chief culprit is the lack of story and, strangely enough for a film about an unassuming British sound engineer (Toby Jones) out of his depth in Italy and increasingly fraught and alienated as he dubs a 70s horror film, a lack of unnerving atmosphere. Aside from his attempts to get reimbursed for his flight out and the increasingly frayed nerves and culture clashes with the film’s producer and director, that’s pretty much it for plot until he finally starts to lose himself as he becomes a part of the film – not the narrative (we only see the title sequence) but more the mechanical texture of the post-production process. What starts out as something initially intriguing unfortunately increasingly adopts the occasionally tedious and repetitive nature of foley and ADR work as the dubbing and mixing process drags on and on and it becomes more apparent that apart from offering the always impressive Jones a chance to slowly unravel the film isn’t really going to go anywhere. Which is a shame, because Strickland clearly has talent and an interesting visual sense (though the use sound is surprisingly comparatively unadventurous) and the film recreates the early 70s Italian horror milieu well, but until the last couple of reels the lack of any real narrative or drive makes it feel like an overlong DVD behind the scenes special feature instead of a real movie.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD
`Berberian Sound Studio' is set in 1970′s Rome, Italy. The studio is working on a new film called `The Equestrian Vortex'. The films director Santini (Antonio Mancino) hires Gilderoy (Toby Jones), an English sound engineer who had previously worked on children's television programmes and natural history documentaries.

Gilderoy assumes that the Italian film was about horses, but when he is greeted by the films producer Francesco (Cosimo Fusco) he discovers that the film is actually a horror movie. With typically English stiff upper lip, Gilderoy dives into an environment completely alien to him. Clearly out of his depth, he's further unnerved by working in a new country with no grasp of Italian. Gilderoy is manipulated by everyone, from the utterly serious Francesco to the lecherous Santini, and even by the moody secretary Elena (Tonia Sotiropoulou).

But Gilderoy knows one thing very well, and that is sound. At the mixing desk, he reigns supreme. He watches over and controls the voices of the actresses Claudia (Eugenia Caruso) and Elisa (Chiara D'Anna) who provide the dialogue and countless screams; the assistants who simulate the violence on screen by slashing and whacking all manner of fruit and vegetables; and creating many of the sounds himself from his own vast repertoire. You appreciate the sound engineers craft from Gilderoy's numerous charts, his maps of how sounds and effects will be layed over the visuals.

Gilderoy clearly relishes his new environment, but equally appalled by it. The uncomfortable subject matter inevitably proves too much for this mild mannered sound engineer, a scene involving a red hot poker and a nun providing the psychological catalyst to his own breakdown.
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews