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Troy 2004 Subtitles

Amazon Instant Video

Available in Prime
(311) IMDb 7.2/10
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This action-adventure epic tells the story of the battle fought over Helen, queen of Sparta, who's been kidnapped by her lover Paris, the Prince of Troy. Her husband decides to invade Troy and kill Helen, so recruits Achilles, the Greek warrior, but he must first settle a score with Hector, Paris's brother.

Starring:
Brad Pitt,Orlando Bloom
Runtime:
2 hours, 36 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Action & Adventure, Historical
Director Wolfgang Petersen
Starring Brad Pitt, Orlando Bloom
Supporting actors Eric Bana, Peter O'Toole, Sean Bean, Brian Cox, Brenden Gleeson, Diane Kruger, Saffron Burrows, Rose Bryne, Julie Christie, Wolfgang Petersen, Brendan Gleeson
Studio Warner Bros.
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By P. G. Gumsley on 19 Nov. 2005
Format: DVD
Troy, like a lot of historical movies with many action sequences, rewards a second viewing. We all know Wolfgang Petersen, like many movie-makers before him, took many liberties with Homer's Iliad but I am happy for myths like this to succumb to the hollywood treatment.
Interestingly, Petersen opts to give us the siege of Troy through Achilles' eyes rather than the classical Helen/Paris scenario, as it opens up the prospects for this big action movie. Achilles was the Rambo of the ancient world, but while Rambo goes on for ever, Achilles, alas, proved to be just mortal in the end. If you view Achilles in that light, you feel less inclined to criticise Pitt for his performance. He was a fighting machine who disliked the squabbling Greeks as much as he did the Trojans, but in the end he had to settle for the lesser of two evils in deciding where his loyalties lay. The pace of the movie, which sustains two romances, gives Pitt little opportunity to do much else other than fight, whilst Eric Bana as Hector at least has more to philosophise over in the shape of his brother Paris' problems, as well as defending Troy itself.
Petersen cleverly presents the opulence and decadence of Troy as opposed to the spartan Greeks and their ambitious plans to topple it. Helen of Troy was no more than a pawn, an excuse to invade Troy, and though Bloom works hard as the cowardly womaniser Paris, he comes over as the spoilt useless younger brother of the more commanding Hector. Diane Kruger, too, has little to do except look gorgeous, and fails to grasp that the invasion is only superficially about herself.
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82 of 89 people found the following review helpful By adanield on 25 Mar. 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Troy (Director's Cut) is so much better than the theatrical version that it is almost hard to believe that they are in essence the same movie. That is not to say that this new version is perfect, it isn't. As with the Theatrical version, the acting is in some instances passable at best and it takes quite a few liberties with the accepted version of events according to Homer. However, what it does do is make the film run far more smoothly than it did before. Considering over 30 minutes of footage has been restored it actually seems to make the film a lot tighter than it was before. The rather disjointed, lacking in focus theatrical version is now replaced with a movie that always keeps you engrossed. Not just in the battle scenes which are really quite brilliant but also in the political intrigues and infighting amongst both the Greeks and the Trojans. Brad Pitt always seems to divide people as to his worth as an actor. I happen to think he is actually quite good. In Troy he is the leading man and he does a good job of holding the film together. According to Homer, Achilles was the most beautiful and the deadliest warrior of his age. Pitt is undoubtedly in excellent physical condition but he also manages to convey Achilles coldness and mastery of arms. His Achilles is a killing machine who cares for almost nothing but his own personal glory. He knows what his alternative futures are before he sails to Troy, but he would rather die young covered in glory than live to be old surrounded by love. There is a vacant look in Achilles eyes almost as though he is aware of everything that is happening around him but doesn't really care as long as it does not seem to personally affect him. However, in war, every action has a knock on effect and Achilles discovers this to his own personal loss.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. O'Brien VINE VOICE on 31 Aug. 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Lord of The Rings has got to be the hardest act to follow in the history of epic cinema - and wisely, Troy doesn't try.

Or at least, this classical swords-and-sandals fest takes a completely different tack. There's CGI in plenty - most spectacularly, for that shot of the ships that launched a thousand trailers, cutting manfully through the Aegean. Elsewhere, though, the emphasis is on climactic single combat - like the terrifying gladiatorial between Brad Pitt's Achilles and Eric Bana's Hector - rather than on massed pitched battles. And unlike Middle Earth where the supernatural holds sway, this vision of the ancient world has excised the Gods, concentrating on the human drama rather than the politics on Mount Olympus.

In any account of classical world, much depends on whether modern actors can capture the peculiar flavour of myth; the inhuman, fatalistic quality which separates Greek fables from later history. Many critics were loath to believe a mid-westerner turned Hollywood heartthrob could handle a legendary demigod. Brad Pitt certainly looks like Homer's Achilles - blond, muscled and athletic - and even if his accent hovers somewhere over the mid-Atlantic, his steely persona here is credibly fate-driven. Strangely, it's in the quieter scenes where this is most apparent; when captive priestess Briseis asks him why he chose the life of a killer he patiently answers: "I chose nothing. I was born, and this is what I am."

Pitt gets sterling support from British stalwarts Sean Bean (Odysseus), Brian Cox (Agamemnon) and new boy Orlando Bloom (Paris), the latter making the most of an unsympathetic role.
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