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Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy 2011

Amazon Instant Video

(596) IMDb 7.1/10
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A senior figure at the Secret Intelligence Service, aka The Circus, George Smiley was forced out by his colleagues. But when it transpires The Circus has been infiltrated by a Soviet double agent he's invited back to flush out the mole. Unsure of who to trust and national security at risk he must work in secret.

Starring:
Tom Hardy,Colin Firth
Runtime:
2 hours, 2 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Action & Adventure
Director Tomas Alfredson
Starring Tom Hardy, Colin Firth
Supporting actors Gary Oldman, Mark Strong, Benedict Cumberbatch
Studio Optimum Releasing
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mark Dyer on 1 Jan. 2013
Format: DVD
Why compare this 2 hour film with the 6 hour serial, or require it to be a precise rendition of a book of more than 400 pages? I thought it a fine attempt to take many plot threads and make two hours of entertainment from them, I enjoyed items that were not present in the book. I do wonder though how the following books will be filmed now that Guillam's character has been changed.

Firstly, there are no explosions, chases, babes or helicopters (as if any potential viewer didn't know that) so be prepared to sit, watch and think rather than expect action and glitz to flow over you. Sure, there are some holes and inconsistencies; I suppose that I take a less forensic view to viewing films than do many of the reviewers here.

I don't care that we don't see the characters build to point the way to the identity of the mole because for me the identity of the mole is immaterial. This is about loyalty, betrayal and sacrifice. A few examples:
* Guillam ends his relationship immediately on considering that it might be used against him, quite a sacrifice in my opinion.
* A terrific moment of acting as Smiley makes a deal with Tarr that he knows will violate Tarr's trust because he can't fulfil the spirit of the deal.
* What a strange world where someone who makes such a sacrifice for their country ends up living in a caravan and teaching at a boarding school after being bunged only a few quid and a car.

There were some nice juxtapositions that made me think of how fragile lives might be and the fine line between normality and hardship.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S. M. Evans on 11 Mar. 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Considering it's only a fraction of the length of the well-known BBC adaptation with Alec Guinness, it's not bad. The performances are almost all sterling. Unfortunately I think John Hurt was miscast again. A bit too much of something to feel realistic. Everyone else was really good.
I'll be honest ... I've not read the book. The only comparison I have is the BBC version, and I do remember that quite well; everyone fits in nicely, and the overall tone is convincingly of the correct era. If you just want a little something to remind you of the basics and don't want to go through all the BBC episodes, this covers the important bases.
I still think the BBC version outshines it by far, but I didn't dislike this film like I was expecting to. I quite enjoyed it.
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Format: DVD
-Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a 2011 Cold War espionage film directed by Tomas Alfredson. The screenplay was written by Bridget O'Connor and Peter Straughan, based on the 1974 novel of the same name by John le Carré.
It stars Gary Oldman as George Smiley, along with Colin Firth, Tom Hardy, John Hurt, Toby Jones, Mark Strong, Benedict Cumberbatch and Ciarán Hinds. Set in London in the early 1970s, the story follows the hunt for a Soviet double agent at the top of the British secret service.
The film was produced through the British company Working Title Films and financed by France's StudioCanal. It premiered in competition at the 68th Venice International Film Festival. It was a critical and commercial success and was the highest-grossing film at the British box office for three consecutive weeks. The film also received three Academy Awards nominations: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Original Score, and for Oldman, Best Actor.
The novel had previously been adapted into the award-winning 1979 BBC TV miniseries Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.
--Critical response:
-Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy received generally positive reviews. Rotten Tomatoes sampled 206 reviewers and judged 83% of the reviews to be positive. The site summarised the film as "a dense puzzle of anxiety, paranoia, and espionage that director Tomas Alfredson pieces together with utmost skill". Metacritic, which assigns a normalised rating in the 0–100 range based on reviews from top mainstream critics, calculated an average score of 85 based on 42 reviews.
-- Sequel:
-While doing press for Working Title's Les Misérables film adaptation, producer Eric Fellner stated that fellow producer Tim Bevan is working with writer Straughan and director Alfredson on developing a sequel. Fellner did not specify if the sequel will be based on The Honourable Schoolboy or Smiley's People, the two remaining Smiley novels in Le Carré's "Karla Trilogy".
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Format: DVD
This 2011 Working Title Films production of Le Carre's 1974 novel 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy' has attracted positive critical reviews, been generally liked by audiences, received some well-deserved award nominations and reportedly made a healthy box-office profit on its modest US$21 million production cost, so is an unexpected commercial success for the French investor StudioCanal.

Director Tomas Alfredson has delivered a serious film for an intelligent audience, but due to the time-constraints of a single 120-minute feature film, the result necessarily compresses the story so much that you need to pay close attention. A complex plot full of intrigue, double-bluff and the slow revelation of characters' hidden motives through real-time action and flashbacks means if you know Le Carre's novel then you'll be better placed to enjoy the film on first time viewing; if you're unfamiliar with the source material, then seeing the film a second time might make for a more satisfying viewing experience as the number of characters and complexity of the plot can be a bit confusing on first pass.

All the cast deliver fine performances with Gary Oldman in superb form as the world-weary but calculating and highly intelligent George Smiley, who has been called out of forced retirement to carry out a discrete investigation to uncover a suspected Soviet mole operating at the highest level of `the circus', the inner core of the UK overseas intelligence service MI6. Oldman has become a fine mature actor and proves here that `less is more', dominating some of his scenes by sheer presence, often with sparse or even no dialogue.
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