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The Hunt 2012

Lukas is a recently-divorced primary school teacher locked in an acrimonious custody battle over his teenage son Marcus.

Starring:
Mads Mikkelsen, Thomas Bo Larsen
Runtime:
1 hour, 50 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, International
Director Thomas Vinterberg
Starring Mads Mikkelsen, Thomas Bo Larsen
Supporting actors Annika Wedderkopp, Lasse Fogelstrøm, Susse Wold, Anne Louise Hassing, Lars Ranthe, Alexandra Rapaport, Sebastian Bull Sarning, Steen Ordell Guldbrand Jensen, Daniel Engstrup, Troels Thorsen, Søren Rønholt, Hana Shuan, Jytte Kvinesdal, Josefine Gråbøl, Bjarne Henriksen, Nicolai Dahl Hamilton, Øyvind Hagen-Traberg, Allan Wibor Christensen
Studio Content Film
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The path taken by the outstanding Mads Mikkelsen's character Lukas is Job-like in his apparent fall from grace. From a warm, familial opening with the menfolk of the community skinny-dipping in an icy lake to a fractured, mistrusted outcast, the journey is intense and thoroughly moving. The naturalistic acting and script is superlative and the performance from the 5 year old playing Klara is exceptional.

From a 'few foolish words' from Klara, Lukas' world is torn apart as he is wrongly-accused of child abuse. Every performance in this film crackles with energy yet is finely nuanced. The direction is superb; all autumnal hues and a tense 'what-will-happen-next?' constantly bubbling beneath the surface. Most importantly, you really care about the characters, one way or the other.

The Hunt could be seen as a companion piece to Vinterberg's Dogme Manifesto film 'Festen' but in my opinion is even more successful in exposing the horrors of human nature, family bonds and a very modern media-fueled hysteria. In simplistic terms, the moral is 'mud sticks' yet the complexities on display here are intelligent and deeply heart-felt.

Without a doubt one of the best films of 2012.
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By Antenna TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Dec. 2012
Format: DVD
In yet another subtle and well-acted Danish film, we see how Lucas, the only male assistant to provide a bit of rough and tumble in a nursery school, finds himself sacked, charged by the police and a pariah in his tight-knit community when a normally truthful child appears to confide to the head teacher that Lucas has sexually abused her. From the outset we are given clues as to other events in the child's life which might be affecting her actions, but which cannot be known to those investigating the issue. Through a series of all too believably blundering attempts to "do the right thing", Lucas is condemned from the outset, wild rumours multiply as people are carried away by "groupthink" to turn against him.

The film skilfully points the finger at others who might be letting Lucas carry the blame for their own misdeeds, and even arouses our own occasional doubts as to his innocence. However, for the most past we feel outrage on his behalf, and a helpless sense of his compounded fate. All the main characters display some depth and changes in their emotions - in the case of Lucas, his natural gentleness and passivity giving way to bursts of retaliation.

The drama is set against a background of the deer hunts which bind the men together in a macho culture which may of course brutally cast out someone who seems to have broken a taboo, and the availability of guns adds a continual underlying threat of violence or tragedy. The film has the entertaining knack of following what seems like a happy event with a sudden twist back into suffering for the unfortunate Lucas.

Although the prejudice and hysteria in the community may seem a little exaggerated, the ending does not baldly "spell everything out" but leaves areas of ambiguity to provide food for thought.
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By ... TOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 April 2013
Format: DVD
A slow puncture of a movie this. The dvd jacket has a quote: 'Riveting.' Unrelentless is closer to the truth. I could not help thinking that there were three flaws in the way the story evolved. First, the words of the child: we the audience know how she learnt them but no adult in the movie thinks to ask: how did she know the words? Second, her unnatural kissing was not interrogated and third, well, that's in the surprising ending.

An interesting atmosphere. The foreign language (Danish) adds to the strangeness of it all. And I did keep watching. Fickle in the face of certain words. The 'evidence' of a young, young mind. Sensitive stuff. Gruelling at times. People.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
Truly wonderful film; the acting was superb from all (when does Mads Mikkelsen EVER put in a bad performance?) and it was a visually beautiful piece.
One or two things seemed a little implausible (and I do have some experience of the issues that film deals with): it seemed odd that no one thought to question Klara's conspicuously adult language when she was describing what Lucas had apparently done to her. If they had managed to get a straight answer out of her (that she had heard the language from an older sibling) then they wouldn't have been so quick to completely believe her and then to put words in her mouth when she faltered in answering further questions. There would surely have been questions asked about her home life too.
The weirdly naive headmistress rather stretched belief: she acknowledges that children, Klara especially, have an active imagination and then refuses to consider the possibility that the little girl might be lying when even Klara herself displays uncertainty and retracts her accusation. I understand that the headmistress is supposed to be mismanaging the situation for the sake of plot development, but that's all it felt like, an expediency for the sake of the plot. She's obviously more than an averagely intelligent, being a teacher, so her actions were a little difficult to believe.
Truth to tell, I'm probably nit picking: I really loved this film and would heartily recommend it, though it isn't an easy watch. Lucas burying his dog in the rain is probably one of the saddest things I've ever seen in a movie. Mads Mikkelsen is heartbreaking.
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