Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Learn More Amazon Pantry Food & Drink Beauty Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Inglourious Basterds 2009

Inglourious Basterds begins in German-occupied France, where Shoshanna Dreyfus witnesses the execution of her family at the hand of Nazi Colonel Hans Landa. Shosanna narrowly escapes and flees to Paris, where she forges a new identity as the owner and operator of a cinema.

Starring:
Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent
Runtime:
2 hours, 32 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Film HD £3.49
Buy Film HD £3.99

Buy

Buy Film HD £3.99
Buy Film SD £3.49

Rent

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Film HD £3.49
Rent Film SD £2.49

Redeem a gift card or promotion code

More Purchase Options
By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Video.

Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama, Action & Adventure
Director Quentin Tarantino, Eli Roth
Starring Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent
Supporting actors Christoph Waltz, Eli Roth, Michael Fassbender, Diane Kruger, Daniel Brühl, Til Schweiger, Gedeon Burkhard, Jacky Ido, B.J. Novak, Omar Doom, August Diehl, Denis Ménochet, Sylvester Groth, Martin Wuttke, Mike Myers, Julie Dreyfus, Richard Sammel, Alexander Fehling
Studio NBC Universal
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robin Friedman TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Jan. 2013
Format: DVD
Written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, "Inglorious Basterds" is a fictitious, visceral story of WW II in which a small group of American Jewish commandos led by Lieutenant Aldo Raine played by Brad Pitt turn the tables on Hitler and his Nazis. The movie is set in Paris during the German occupation. Besides Pitt, the major character is the Nazi "Jew Hunter" Hans Landa played by Austrian actor Christoph Waltz. Landa is suave, intelligent, shrewd, and deadly. Waltz does an extraordinary job of acting in portraying this difficult character.

The movie movies swiftly and held my attention throughout its 150 minutes. The movie is violent and crude with many scenes of beatings, cuttings, and killings. It captures the brutality of the war. In the movie, while not in fact, the Nazis get a deserved and swift comeuppance. It is a movie of vengeance.

I was engaged with this movie but found it valuable to step back and remember that it is a work of fiction. Some intelligent criticism has suggested that in this film that roles of the Nazis and the Jews has, if not been reversed, at least been somewhat equated. As in some other WW II movies, German top leadership is portrayed as consisting of buffoons. Tragically, WW II did not happen like this.

The movie was absorbing, dark, and wrenching but not especially probing. I did not find it nearly as effective or entertaining as Tarantino's more recent movie, "Django Unchained". Christoph Waltz is oustandining in both films.

Robin Friedman
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Blu-ray
Do you know what, the film is so 'way-out' ....it's actually pretty good.
Maybe the best thing 'Quentin Tarantino' has done so far ?
The film itself contains glimpses of a warped reality from 'World War '2' along with a measure of 'graphic' violence, and of course much 'tongue -in -cheek' humour.
The story ? ....a novel and of course fictional early end to the war, prior to which 'a hit-squad' are placed in occupied 'France' around the time of the 'Normandy' landings, task.....to kill as many 'German's' as they possibly can.
As i say the film is pretty entertaining to watch, and is no question 'worth a spin'
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
This is the kind of movie only Quentin Tarantino seems able to get away with. A typically irreverent, cunning and scatological piece of flotsam that does everything against the accepted movie-making conventions but mostly works nonetheless.

Watching it, I kept thinking about all those `how to write a screenplay' courses and instruction books and reflecting on how the writing for `Inglorious Basterds' would probably fail all the standard academic criteria for success. Here is a 153 minute long movie that largely consists of lengthy conversations between two or more characters, usually sitting statically at tables and ranging around all sorts of commonplace chit-chat before getting to the point. The point, when eventually reached, then usually climaxes in a short, brutal moment of extreme violence. The film also pays scant attention to its titular characters, who are mostly just there to supply the key moments of violence. Tarantino prefers to turn conventions around and promote nominal supporting roles into the predominant leads. Finally, there's the intriguing awareness that this screenplay could probably be adapted as a theatre play with minimal change and a pretty modest budget. In fact, if somebody told you the whole thing was a filmed stage play you'd probably believe it.

Tarantino's usual indulgences are as much to the fore as ever - pastiche, self-awareness, smugness, overlength and endless movie references. The whole thing starts with a lengthy tribute to the opening of Once Upon a Time in the West and another long scene, involving the French heroine played by Melanie Laurent, looks like something lifted straight from a late-50s New Wave classic by Goddard or Truffaut.
Read more ›
6 Comments 42 of 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By ... TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Mar. 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is no glory flick. Of all the films that have been compared with Inglourious Basterds, the Hannibal Lecter films struck me hard as a comparison.

I can understand how reversing historical facts is entertaining and can inform new audiences of how they originally happened. So, the savagery of the German killing of millions of civilians, in the early nineteen forties, is portrayed by the savagery of a group formed to kill German soldiers in the same period. Only German uniforms legitimise their actions.

Tarantino's skill lies in how he saves the real horror for the dialogue. So many scenes are imbued with so many layers that the tension beneath what is being said is truly palpable for the audience. One thing that remains from most German war films is the shear fear of those in command in the SS and the Gestapo. Their entrances are deliberately theatrical. They always command the stage.

Pretence is a very frail front in a time of war. Wafer thin. Watch this film on your own at your peril. This film contains real pain unlike many of the post-war films. 'Kelly's Heroes' presented us with a clean war. A war were oddballs were lauded and praised and necessary, a war for a recognisable profit (gold) and a war of brilliant humour between men energised by the thought of making something from it. I saw it at the ABC in St. Helens in my teens, Saturday matinee and left whistling the theme tune and reflecting on all those "negative waves." Free individuals looking out for each other because of a common goal.

Inglourious Basterds is not entertaining. I bought the dvd of 'District 9' recently and reviewed it in poem form. When I saw that film I could hardly wait to see it again. It is interesting that Tarantino's film has not been available for rental.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse