Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Amazon Pantry Food & Drink Beauty Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now

The Age of Innocence 1993

4.3 out of 5 stars (52) IMDb 7.2/10

An adaptation of Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel which chronicles the hypocrisy of high society in the 1880s and tells of three wealthy New Yorkers caught in a love triangle.

Starring:
Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer
Runtime:
2 hours, 12 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

When renting, you have 30 days to start watching this video, and 48 hours to finish once started.

Rent Movie SD £2.49
Buy Movie SD £6.99

Redeem a gift card or promotion code

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Video.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director Martin Scorsese
Starring Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer
Supporting actors Winona Ryder, Linda Faye Farkas, Michael Rees Davis, Terry Cook, Jon Garrison, Richard E. Grant, Alec McCowen, Geraldine Chaplin, Mary Beth Hurt, Stuart Wilson, Howard Erskine, John McLoughlin, Christopher Nilsson, Miriam Margolyes, Siân Phillips, Carolyn Farina, Michael Gough, Alexis Smith
Studio Sony Pictures International
BBFC rating Universal, suitable for all
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Martin Scorsese directs Daniel Day-Lewis, Michelle Pfeiffer and Winona Ryder in a good adaptation of Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. A romance about three New Yorkers caught in a tragic love triangle, this is a well produced film that keeps your attention throughout. I recently saw this again having watched it many years ago and I can say that without doubt this has stood the test of time well.
Comment 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
How to Film a Novel

This is arguably the finest translation of a major novel into film since Bondarchuk's War and Peace.

It rests upon the premise that Edith Wharton is a far greater artist than anyone working on the film and that her text deserves the utmost respect. Respect rooted in intimate knowledge of and understanding of her magnificent novel.

What is here but is missing from all those lamentable costume dramas generated by Hollywood and the BBC calling themselves films based upon great novels, is a script which recognises that a novel works through language, not primarily through plot or costume. It is the way Wharton makes us see New York society which is at the heart of this experience, not any number of incidents, or impressive performances by famous actors. The attention to period detail is part of that respect for the author, not an opportunity to show off. Scorsese understands late nineteenth century New York because he and his team have done meticulous homework and used that research to illuminate the text: it has not been an exercise is showing off. Similarly, Daniel Day Lewis, the embodiment of a patrician New York hero with subversive cultural refinements and Michelle Pfeiffer never fail to realise not their own idea of Archer and Ellen, but Edith Wharton's shrewdly drawn characters. Winona Ryder alone is peculiarly miscast as the fair, tall, Diana-like embodiment of bourgeois respectability.
The Age Of Innocence [DVD] [2001]
If only Scorsese would now give us The House of Mirth or What Maisie Knew!
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
I rate this movie three stars as the result of some complicated calculations, of which the detail is as follows:

1. Basically, this is a ONE star movie. Why? Because in this movie virtually NOTHING happens! And this is a REEEAAAAALLLLYYYYY long one - 132 minutes is not a small thing to swallow, believe me, I know! Now, this kind of movie can be very dangerous. The first time I went to see it, I was with a date. Now, this date was to become later my fiancée, then my bride and ultimately the mother of my children. All of which almost didn't happen, because of this movie! Even now, after all this time, my wife reminds me "The Age of Innocence" disaster if she wants to put me down. So, be warned - this is a VERY long nothing!

2. I must give however one more star for Michelle Pfeiffer. Although she has a lot of screen time, she doesn't have to play much in this movie - remember, nothing ever happens on the screen, or so little. But considering that she is one of the greatest actresses alive and that she is at her most gorgeous moment in this movie, even when doing nothing, she does it with a breathtaking perfection...

3. And then, one more star for the ONE moment in the movie when something happens. It is THE conversation between Daniel Day-Lewis and Winona Ryder and this is a GREAT moment of cinema. It is a short one, so pay attention not to miss it, and there is still much more nothing to watch before the end, but it is worth a star. Definitely.

All in all, this movie would be a great masterpiece, if it was a short story of 30-40 minutes. But at more than two hours it is not a movie, it is more like a Hollywood version of WMDs... If you watch it at home, prepare coffee... lot of coffee. And, no matter what, DO NOT watch it with your date - not all women are as forgiving as the one I married...
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape
A rarity, in that the film is better than the novel! Based on the novel of the same name by Edith Wharton, Scorsese keeps strictly to the text by good use of narration. The cinematography and direction are excellent. The opening titles with the rose unfolding are beautiful, and the ball-room scene is well handled.
Day-Lewis, Pfeiffer and Ryder all give exceptional performances which just catch you up in the story. Even though there is actually very little action, the story, direction and acting all combine to carry you along, and break your heart together with the characters.
One of my all time favourite films, which I would recommend as a must see!
Comment 27 of 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
My best memory of Age of Innocence is because I saw it in Hong Kong in 1994, complete with Cantonese subtitles! What the Chinese made of 19th Century American society I don't know, but this drama of manners displays the gentler, subtler side of Scorsese's virtuoso film-making talent - none too evident in his more explosive and passionate films, but none the worse for that.
He uses a full palette to create light and shade without the sin of being clumsy or heavy-handed in any way. In fact, the director keeps a light touch throughout, greatly to his credit.
The underlying tensions within this moral tale are heavily contained and masked by the mores and culture of respectable society. not difficult to see why actors of a certain ilk love period drama, when they can use a full breadth of emotional techniques, with and without dialogue. Day Lewis, Pfeiffer and Ryder enjoy themselves to good effect, and the story is told competently throughout.
Not the most exciting film you'll ever see, but worthy of appreciation, particularly as a competitively-priced DVD.
Comment 26 of 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews