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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 2011

Everything in the young wizard's life, from his nearly fatal confrontation with Lord Voldemort as an infant to his adventures at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, have led young Harry Potter to the battle that is his destiny in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.Now, the boy must become a man to lead the fight against the Dark Lord.

Starring:
Ralph Fiennes, Michael Gambon
Runtime:
2 hours, 10 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Fantasy, Children & Family, Science Fiction, Teen & Young Adult
Director David Yates
Starring Ralph Fiennes, Michael Gambon
Supporting actors Alan Rickman, Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Evanna Lynch, Domhnall Gleeson, Clémence Poésy, Warwick Davis, John Hurt, Helena Bonham Carter, Graham Duff, Anthony Allgood, Rusty Goffe, Jon Key, Kelly Macdonald, Jason Isaacs, Helen McCrory, Tom Felton
Studio Warner Bros.
BBFC rating Suitable for 12 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
When all is said and done - when the eye candy special effects of Quidditch matches and fantastical creatures has been superseded by advances in technology in Hollywood blockbusters yet to come - it is the little moments that this viewer and his wife will return to.

When a friend one time bemoaned the fact that `Half-Blood Prince' gets bogged down in pointless hormonal teen-angst instead of getting on with the story, I smiled... and shook my head.

No, I said, that IS the story and it's what I love about the Harry Potter series: it never loses track of the characters. It never forgets that, when viewed as a whole, these eight movies are a story of growing up, of the transition from childhood to adulthood. Of love and friendship and death. Because without those little funny and touching moments between the characters - if all you want is for the movies to rush from one plot element to another - then all you're left with is plot... and no story. Remember: plot is what happens TO the characters; story is what happens AS A RESULT of the characters.

That's the real gorgeous beauty of these movies, and it's what will bring viewers back repeatedly to their DVD shelves. As Frodo said to Sam in `The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers': "What are we fighting for Sam?" "That's there's still some good in this world," Sam replies, "and that it's worth fighting for."

That's why you need those little indulgent moments, because without them it's just razzle-dazzle special effects and set-pieces. Harry and Ginny's first kiss: they're in the Room of Requirement and Ginny tells Harry to close his eyes while she hides Professor Snape's copy of Advanced Potion Making.
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Format: DVD
It's only taken 3 years but, with a new DVD player, I feel I've finally seen this film properly (when we saw it at the pictures, when it came out, we had a nearly empty cinema with a family of six right behind us, and the five year old explaining the concept of cinema to the three year old. I'd have said something but was afraid of being shot).

It's very good. Right from the first (ish) shot of Snape staring down over Hogwarts, with the students marching in Stalinist blocks. My only regret with the whole thing (I think) is that the Carrows make such a poor showing.

And the far more grown-up emphasis is evident from the first scene in the cottage by the sea. Luna dispassionately stating that wind chimes do not keep evil at bay. The following exchange with Griphook and Olivander are shorn of the whimsical cadences with which adults like to frost a child's world. Griphook is cold-bloodedly mercenary, while Olivander is a broken man (Warwick Davies and John Hurt both on tremendous form) and Harry is no longer too young to tell Olivander 'You're lying', nor too nice not to at least consider double-crossing Griphook.

Of course the goblin is a double-dealing little git, who gets incinerated, and the whole Goblin species seems to lose credibility in Gringotts' treatment of that poor dragon, but part of the new Voldemort-era look of the bank is a modernising of all the old Victoriana, so they all now look, well, like C21 bankers. It's rather as if someone is making a point like 'Don't trust bankers cos they're just like the Goblins in this film'.

(One of my favourite moments is Helena Bonham-Corset playing Hermione disguised as Belatrix - it's very funny)

And from there it's off to Hogsmeade, and then into the school, and then into battle.
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Format: DVD
Perhaps this is the best place to review the series as well as the last installment. We have seen Daniel Radcliffe mature from a fairy bad actor to one that is fairly convincing, particularly in his standing up to Aberforth Dumbledore. Emma Watson has gone from awkward kid who wore her emotions on her sleeve to Maxim's top 100 Hottest women. The passing of Richard Harris was a major let down to the series as Michael Gambon couldn't really fill his shoes. The most interesting and complex character was that of Snape. Alan Rickman made the series with his portrayal. The casting of the quirky minor characters made the story most enjoyable, all the way down to Mrs. Fink. Rowling's use of classical mythology, astronomy and the occult made the series an incredible educational experience. One of my favorite characters was the under used Luna Lovegood. She was a breath of fresh air.

The direction of Chris Columbus was by far the best as well as the screen adaptations, which more closely followed the books. Starting with the third installment, the audience got short changed (There, I said it) especially those who didn't read the books...such as myself. This wasn't a bad thing as it led to a bonding with my niece who did read the books and I would take her to the films so she could explain them to me. Like Hermione, she is one of those "insufferable know-it-alls" who loves to let you know what she knows. (Good luck with that brain surgeon thing.)

In this final episode, the gang of 3 go after the remaining Horcrux(s) which are now easier to locate than in the last 2 films. This one follows the later films in that it lacks the humor of the earlier ones.

The movie, like the series drives home the ideas of teamwork, friendship, and courage.
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