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Somewhere 2010

Available in Prime
3.0 out of 5 stars (37) IMDb 6.4/10

A witty and moving story about the special bond between a father and his daughter. Actor Johnny Marco is leading the fast-paced lifestyle of a tabloid celebrity. He's comfortably numb with his life of women and pills when his 11-year-old daughter, Cleo, unexpectedly arrives at his room at Hollywood's legendary Chateau Marmont hotel.

Starring:
Stephen Dorff, Chris Pontius
Runtime:
1 hour, 38 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Comedy
Director Sofia Coppola
Starring Stephen Dorff, Chris Pontius
Supporting actors Erin Wasson, Alexandra Williams, Nathalie Fay, Kristina Shannon, Karissa Shannon, John Prudhont, Ruby Corley, Angela Lindvall, Maryna Linchuk, Meghan Collison, Jessica Miller, Elle Fanning, Lala Sloatman, Renée Roca, Aurélien Wiik, Lauren Hastings, Amanda Anka, Ellie Kemper
Studio NBC Universal
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Miss Coppola has directed four feature films.
The peerless 'Lost in Translation', and 'The Virgin Suicides' are about restraint, one internally and the other externally imposed.
'Somewhere' and 'Marie Antoinette' are about lack of restraint.
They could not, however, be more different.
The protagonist, Johnny, has it all and he has nothing. His recreations are casual sex and his Ferrari. He has freedom and money galore. But there is no focus to his life, that is until he is obliged to care for his pubescent daughter (Cleo). She is his emotional salvation and in her innocence is the antithesis of the other women in his life. She redeems him.
The film moves unhurriedly, sometimes very slowly. It give the viewer time to think. But it never grabbed me. I remained indifferent to Johnny's existence. I didn't care about him; but I did care about Cleo, though not excessively because I knew she would not be corrupted. Hence it almost, but not quite, failed for me.
Yes, I'll watch it again, but not for some time.
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Format: DVD
Most reviewers tend to focus on the figure of Johnny - but what about Cleo, his 11-year-old daughter? She is resilient, well-adapted, flexible, at ease in adult company, socially practised, accomplished in every way. But also sad, neglected by egocentric parents who no doubt love her but see her as a bit of a nuisance in their lives. She needs to move, as 11-year old children need to do. This is clearly signalled in a number of scenes. But what chance to move within the claustrophobic confines of the Chateau Marmont? She wants to play, something that Johnny's own childhood pal picks up. Johnny himself scarcely notices. A scene in a hotel swimming pool scarcely big enough to swim two or three strokes illustrates this most poignantly: Cleo vigorously swimming back and forth like an animal in a tiny cage.

There are revealing moments of deep sadness. Cleo is not at all keen to experience her father sleeping around - something he can ill conceal from her watchful and over-adult eyes. And in the key scene of the film, she reveals in one brief moment her deep sadness, her insecurity and anxiety. Johnny is sympathetic but has no adequate response: he just packs her off to summer camp. And of course we then see her setting off to summer camp as resilient, well-adapted, flexible... As ever. You could say that Johnny doesn't do anything terribly wrong as a father, he is kind and understanding and non-judgemental with his daughter. But is that enough? No doubt she will get all the movement she needs at the summer camp - but will she not sadly miss the family she doesn't really have?

It is hard not to draw personal parallels between Sophia Coppola and Cleo: after all, Sophia was once the 11-year-old daughter of a huge Hollywood personality. This is a beautifully photographed, beautifully acted, superbly directed film. Understatement all the way. Watch it twice, at least, to see the fine details which tell us so much that is not loudly expressed.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Like other Sophia Coppola movies you need to be in the correct mindset to enjoy it the most, you need to "drink" it slowly, if you do, it will come back to your mind one and again as a memory that makes you think. There are not so many of these. It is another Sophia Coppola's subtle, beautiful portrait of loneliness. A small work of art.
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By Call me Al TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 20 May 2015
Format: DVD
To state the obvious, all films are interpreted by the viewer in their own universe, with their own prejudices and experiences. Somewhere has been regarded by many as a lightweight self-indulgent shallow philosophical naval gazing movie about celebrity lifestyle. This is a valid viewpoint. However, I take a rather different perspective and regard this film as a sensitive, touching and empathetic exploration of a lonely man sleepwalking through an empty hedonist life who belatedly begins to appreciate the unique and valuable relationship between himself and his daughter. The pseudo-documentary style of directing prefers to show rather than tell, allowing silences to linger amongst the frenetic vacuous interactions which punctuate the film star lifestyle presented. This is slow, assured and confident filmmaking of the highest standard, and although not eclipsing the impressive Lost In Translation still boasts a delightful wry humour which binds the whole film. The performances of Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning as father and daughter are impressively understated and affecting. In this gentle film Sofia Coppola has subtly invited us all to reflect on our own lives, our values and our relationships with the people we care for. I loved it.
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Format: Blu-ray
Sofia Coppola is a fascinating director from The Virgin Suicides through Lost In Translation and Marie Antoinette she has a unique style and repeatedly visits certain themes. People often love or hate her films, there are very few `meh' responses as Coppola treads a cinematic path all her own - at once fantastical, whimsy, soul-wired and life-affirming.

Somewhere is the tale of Johnny Marco (Stephen Dorff), who is film star, womaniser, hard living `guy' first and sometime father to his smart, lovely daughter Cleo (Elle `going to be a bigger star than her sister Dakota' Fanning). The film eschews having a traditional story and rather works through three `acts', each of which sees Dorff in a different light.

Somewhere is a very visual film, it may have little dialogue but it still has a brilliant `feel' which viewers will either connect with and love or reject and hate. The father / daughter bonding is the engine that drives the plot - basically we get to tag along as Cleo visits her dad and gets to experience his movie star lifestyle.

Before his daughter's arrival, women are just objects to Marco - expressed in a great double bill of scenes where hot blonde twins pole dance for him in his Chateau Marmont hotel room - and despite their eager efforts he can barely keep himself awake. When Cleo impacts his life he has to do dad duties such as watching her ice-skate and the remarkable juxtaposition of his seeing her as a girl developing into a woman makes him re-assess his whole world view.

Somewhere is a wonderful film and it looks fantastic on Blu-Ray - it made my top 10 films of 2010 and I highly recommend seeking it out!
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