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Candy 2006

A poet is in love with two kinds of candy - an actress called Candy and heroin. She falls for him, his lifestyle and heroin. Hooked on each other as much as drugs, their relationship alternates between oblivion, self-destruction and despair.

Starring:
Heath Ledger, Abbie Cornish
Runtime:
1 hour, 43 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance, International
Director Neil Armfield
Starring Heath Ledger, Abbie Cornish
Supporting actors Geoffrey Rush, Tom Budge, Roberto Meza-Mont, Tony Martin
Studio The Movie Partnership
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Abbie Cornish once again proves that she is an incredibly talented young actor, and Heath Ledger is excellent too.

It's a story that's been told many times before, but their portrayal of a young couple in love spiralling deeper and deeper into drug addiction is exemplary. This is a gruelling film that spares us none of the details of the humiliation and indignities addicts will put themselves through to feed their habit, yet it's told with such compassion and complete lack of judgement, that you desperately want these two young people to pull through and live 'happy ever ever'.

Add to this great direction, clever camera work and a moving supporting performance from Geoffrey rush and you've got a film that's well worth watching.
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Format: DVD
Candy has to rate as one of my favourite films of all times. I fell in love with it the first time I saw it, after discovering it by complete chance after joining an Abbie Cornish group on Facebook last year, and every time I've seen it since, I've loved it more and more. There's always something new to notice, another scene which for whatever reason will have a different effect on you than it did the last time you saw it.
The title sequence alone, with a tear-jerking version of Song to the Siren, is enough to move the audience in a way that most films never achieve.
An outstanding cast, brilliant script, very well directed and just all round amazing. Be warned though, this film is not for the faint-hearted. Several scenes are quite graphic and upsetting, and even I, who never cries at films, ever, had tears in my eyes twice during this. Seeing this film only after Heath Ledger had died made it all the more moving, and I actually felt incredibly guilty for not recognising him as the amazing talent he was while he was alive. Equally Abbie Cornish shows herself to be incredibly talented, and makes me wonder how the hell she's gone relatively unnoticed, media-wise.
My only question regarding this film is why, when Heath Ledger's film credits are mentioned, does this film never appear in the lists? This stunning film really does deserve a lot more attention than it got.

NB: I've read the book as well, which was equally fantastic, if not slightly disturbing and just plain graphic, both in terms of drug usage and sex. Still, I highly reccommend them both!
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Format: DVD
This is a film that will stay in my mind for a long while. Several times throughout watching it, it suddenly re-hit me that Ledger is no longer with us and it made me ache in a way I hadn't when I first heard he'd died. There's so much to talk about with Candy, but the over-riding aspect of it is the direction.

Some scenes focus on Dan and Candy (Ledger and Abbie Cornish) living in bedsit squalor, strung out, bleak and dark. But other scenes glow with Summer sun-light. From sweeping slow-motion shots of golden corn swaying in the breeze, to the two lovers kissing while the sunlight tickles their faces... it's beautifully languid; it's gorgeous. And all the more bleak for it.

Candy is broken up into 3 parts: Heaven, Earth and Hell. Heaven chronicles their relationship in the beginning, when heroin was a hobby, and when the bulk of their sustenance was sunshine and each other. In any other film, these 2 actors could play the jock and cheer-leader of the high-school so beautiful are they, which makes their inexorable slide into addiction all the more shocking. Earth is where they are bouncing from hit to hit, suffering and in pain, but still able to find themselves again if they tried to look.

When Candy becomes pregnant, they try to go cold turkey, and they are on the very brink of coming out the other side, when she loses the baby. We are shown the still-birth baby when his dad asks to hold him, and the reactions of both Ledger and Cornish will make you curl in on yourself. Tragedy shadows them both from the opening scene, but this event is what makes them really hit rock bottom, at which point we enter the segment entitled Hell. 2 minutes into Hell, I got in my car and went for a drive. I needed to be reminded that the world is beautiful, and that I wasn't alone.
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Format: DVD
"When I first met Candy..."
Heath Ledger gives an astounding performance as Dan, a friendly poet and the lover of painter Candy, played by Abbie Cornish, who is attracted to his bohemian lifestyle. The two are drug abusers and find themselves becoming more and more addicted to heroin, and also each other.

The film makes you want to cry, both actors delivering bewilderingly beautiful performances. Dan's inability to refuse Candy anything making him a weak central charater whom we love, Ledger's calm deep voice makes Dan as real as any boy you'd meet on the street.

People who compare the book to the film, should stop and marval at the film as an entity of its own - the directing is brilliant and the humor is also great.

It's worth a watch by everyone and will stay in your mind for a long time.
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Candy is a masterpiece about love and addiction. It started filming on January 27, 2005 and was released on February 15, 2006. Candy is 1.000 times better than Trainspotting (and Trainspotting was really good) and 1.000 times less known than Trainspotting. Candy is a touching and strong love story full of despair, hope, regrets, dreams & failures. The story does not try to judge, punish or teach. There are no good and bad guys. Candy is a human and honest portrayal of the hell of heroine, a story about real love and a movie that will break your heart into a million pieces. Heath describes the movie like “a film of love (…) not a story about heroine”. Heath explains: “Heroine is involved but I think that the beauty of this film [is that] it’s not exploding heroine or glorifying it in any way (…) It’s a tragic story of love”. Director Neil Armfield was a bit hesitant about using Heath as Dan, since he thought that Heath had a natural energy that was heroic, and Dan was grubby and edgy. But, again, it was Heath’s performance in Monter’s Ball that “got him” the role. Luke Davies (the writer of the book upon which the movie is based and screenwriter of the movie, together with director Neil Armfield) wrote a beautiful and touching article about Heath after Heath’s death; he describes Heath as a talented, generous, kind and sincere human being, and says: “It was Monster’s Ball that convinced Neil Armfield that Ledger was the one for Candy“. What attracted Heath to the project was the novel, which he describes like a “tragic love affair with both the drug and each other”, the screenplay and the fact of being allowed to use his own accent, which he didn’t do since Two Hands and 10 things I hate about you: “shooting a film using my own accent was attractive … I haven’t done that for 8 years.Read more ›
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