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4.5 out of 5 stars
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4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 9 May 2014
I have been living with this album a few weeks now, and have played it endlessly. I absolutely loved "Torches", and was very much looking forward to "Supermodel". Although it is lyrically darker, there are still the same great pop tunes and vocal harmonies running through this album. "Coming of Age" grabs you straight away, as does "Best Friend" and a couple of other tracks. Some songs take a little bit longer to worm themselves into your brain, but, after a few plays, you find yourself singing along to all them. I for one am not disappointed with this album, and would certainly buy their next one .
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on 25 March 2014
Great 2nd album, been looking forward to it for so long. They've experimented a little bit, but still keeping some elements of Torches, which I love. Not 1 bad song on the album, and it really is a great mix, not disappointed at all. Saw them live yesterday at Troxy in London, and they were amazing. Love this band, and love this album! Highly recommend.
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on 25 March 2014
Supermodel is the second studio album from the indie-pop-rock crossover band Foster The People.

The new album follows the success of their 2011 début Torches. Opinions aside for the moment, those looking for a second 'Torches' will be left wanting. Not to say that this record doesn't have its unashamedly pop moments ('Coming of Age', 'Are You What You Want to Be') but 'Supermodel' take a significant detour towards a more eclectic sound.

And no doubt this was fully intentional. Head man Mark Foster intended this record to be more 'gritty' and that it certainly is having been produced on the road during their 2012 tour in a portable studio. The record dips into various rock influences intended to extend as far back 'the kinks' and 'the clash' but actually stomping on more recent ground i.e. Thom Yorke ('Goats in Trees') and The Killers ('The Truth'). In fact often its very easy to forget what band you are listening to.

Lyrically the album deals with the (clichéd) "ugly side of capitalism". Infused into the music after the music was created (i.e. in a two stage process) the words often sit uncomfortably with the sound. But where the lyrics fail the music certainly excels. I bet you never expected Foster The People to produce a truly great track like 'Goats in Trees'.

The most exciting thing about this album is that the after scratching away the pop façade created by 'Torches', Mark Foster et al. have exposed a fascinating underbelly that shows intermittent signs of brilliance. This is not a 5* album but there are many outros and a few singular tracks that hint at a promising future. The album has already split critics and fans / but in my mind this a positive step forward. In searching for the best summary of the album I couldn't top the comment made by Q magazine in that this is an "album of transition rather than a definitive statement".

Listen to: 'Ask Yourself', 'Nevermind', 'Goats in Trees', 'Fire Escape'
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on 12 May 2014
FTP are trying to produce a different record here, but its no less entertaining than their first outing. Some of the tracks may take a few more listens than the more upbeat, catchy original album, but this gives a hint of future work which is going in a healthy direction for a 'malt whiskey' band; maturing with age!
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on 5 September 2014
Like all good albums it took a few listens. It was always going to be hard to follow up the stupendous Torches but this comes close.

I am not 100% convinced about 'Goats in Trees' but that is not enough to stop me giving this top marks.
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on 27 June 2014
I personally prefer this to Torches actually. But as some people have said, it signifies a slight change in direction without being too drastic. The gritty direction it has taken suits me more than Torches did. I can't stop listening to 'Nevermind' and 'Best Friend'. Great album from a great band!
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on 21 July 2014
Perfect pop, and so much better than the utter dross that plagues the charts, if you loved Torches you will love this
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on 31 March 2014
The album is good but a distant second to torches, which is probably the best mp3 at £4.99 I've ever bought.

My favourite tracks are:
Coming of age
Nevermind
Best friend
A beginner's guide to destroying the moon.
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on 2 April 2014
I have found to like many songs on this album such as 'Best Friend', 'Coming of Age' and 'Are You What You Want to Be?'. I have enjoyed the album - yes, but I feel like it is not quite as good as Torches. I feel like some of the tracks are wasted such as "The Angelic Welcome of Mr. Jones" which I feel like what is the point of evening having it on, yet of course others may disagree yet this is my own opinion.

Don't get me wrong, this is a very good album, but for me, not quite as good as their first one, Torches.
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on 13 January 2015
In my taste, it does not reach the same level as the first album.
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