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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 3 September 2013
Bomb Girls records the stories of nine women who, as young girls, worked in the dispersed Royal Ordnance Factories during the Second World War. Their job was to make the bombs, bullets and other lethal weapons to defeat the Germans, Italians and Japanese in the Second World War. It was an extraordinarily dangerous occupation. The chemicals and explosives were injurious to health and explosively lethal if mishandled. The factories were dispersed around the country to reduce the risk of being bombed, and nearly all the workforce was comprised of young women, some being as young as seventeen. Many left home to do the job, often resulting in serious homesickness, but many also made lifelong friendships, and look back with pride on those years of when they made a substantial contribution to helping Britain win the war. The book contains recent interviews with nine women who are now in their late eighties and early nineties. They were definitely made of the right stuff. It is a pleasure and a privilege to read their histories, most of them having come from very simple backgrounds. It is a deep pity that their contribution to the defeat of the Axis Powers has never received official recognition, so this book will, perhaps, persuade Whitehall and the Government to honour the women whilst we still have time.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 22 August 2013
My Mum was so pleased to get a copy of this book especially as she is mentioned in it in Laura's story.
Gave me an insight into what the girls working in munitions went through and nice it was in their own words.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 19 October 2013
This book tells The stories of some of the thousands for women who worked in munitions factories in the Second World War. It starts with a few chapters giving an introduction to munitions factories, and how and where they operated, and then tells individual stories of some of the women who worked in them - the vast majority of the workers were women.
The book is very good as far as it goes. Unfortunately, for me it has two major downsides. Firstly, it is written by someone who is campaigning for recognition for the people who worked in the factories. Now I have no problem with that campaign; their contribution was not, and even now has not been, fully recognised. However, it does get a bit tiring when the campaign is mentioned for the umpteenth time.
Secondly, the individual stories become a little bit repetitive. I realise that the number of women involved who were still alive when the book was written was dwindling all the time, but they all seem to come from the same background, and their stories are all very similar. You can almost predict what is going to be said.
Having said all that, this is an important book, because it does give a voice to these women, and puts on record what they did and what they achieved.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 June 2014
This book was absolutely outstanding, and the women who sacrificed so much during the wars should be applauded. It was a fantastic insight into British history. It was harrowing in that if you were a 20/21 year old single female, you would more than likely be sent to work in the bomb factories, and the danger of the factories was well known. It is a truly inspiring read and I would recommend it to anyone because these women should be remembered just as much as the fallen soldiers. Complete and utter heroes.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
This book is great.
I found it particulary interesting because my mother was in the orderance factory during the war.
It gives you an insight of what they put up with to enable this country to win the war.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 9 July 2014
Enjoyed the book but what about the girls in the munitions factories in WW1? They didn't get thanked either. They earnt good money for the time, better than people in other jobs, so were far better off.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 5 July 2014
My mother was a Bomb Girl. This book confirms everything she told me, including her feelings of being forgotten by the Nation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 May 2014
This very interesting book is a collection of reminiscences from munitions workers during WW11. They really are unsung heroes, their work was highly dangerous and hazardous to their health. The overriding aim was to produce a variety of shells, bullets and bombs for the Forces - at any cost, wether it be lives or personal happiness. Naively, I had no idea so many women were conscripted into this industry and I'm sure there were a lot more accidents than were officially recorded. These women certainly deserve official recognition of their contribution to the War Effort, they were in as much danger as any soldier.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 29 April 2014
An aspect of the second world war often overlooked by historians. Well written and informative on the dangers faced daily by these women workers and how they met it with camaraderie and humour. Accidents caused by explosives, acid and the machines resulted in burns and loss of limbs. as well as the constant threat of air raids. At it's height there were over two million women working as part of the war effort; making a vast contribution to the eventual victory.
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on 26 October 2013
I liked it and it was very readable. It is the story of 9 individual girls who worked in the bomb factories during WWII. By having the individual stories, it also manages to cover several different factories around the country and different aspects of the work involved making different munitions and different parts of the production.
It gives a good impression of the way people lived before the war and during the war so it is not only a recollection of working in a munitions factory but a social record as well. As the book is based on the recollections of various brave ladies who must all have been retired when their individual stories were told, based on the time when they were young, single and very brave, the book is one of the few records that covers that part of the war effort with an authentic and personal view.
What it did not do was to cover Woolwich Arsenal, the Enfield site or the Waltham Abbey site all doing (I believe) different functions in the London area. As Woolwich was the HQ or at least the factory already in operation before war was even declared, it was the trained staff there who were posted out to get the new sites running. Recommended reading for those who have an interest in Britain's past history.
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