Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

2,579
4.6 out of 5 stars
The Martian
Format: Audio DownloadChange
Price:£9.20
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
TOP 100 REVIEWERon 1 July 2015
Now The Martian is a read that everyone on Goodreads seems to be talking about and seems almost universally loved, so I had a bit of a shock three or four chapters when I found I wasn’t really liking it that much. The reason – the science - there is a lot of physics in this read and at first it seemed to go way over my head. But, I persevered and I am so glad I did, because pretty soon I was hooked and I ended up loving this read. It is a story of human endeavour against the odds, about never giving up even when the odds are totally stacked against you. I think though that the real reason I ended up loving this book was the main character, Mark Watney. What can I say about him? Well, he is funny, cheeky, irreverent, positive thinking, a doer. He is courageous and resourceful and it is his constant problem solving that really made me warm to him. Before I knew it I was rooting for him and desperately wanting him to survive. He is stuck in probably the harshest environment not yet known to man, where the slightest little accident could kill him, yet time and time again he puts his “problem solving” cap on and works out a solution. He is a very real character, one that I totally fell for and in the end it almost felt as if I was reading about a real person. Similarly, the physics, despite being way over my head at times, felt real and feasible.

It is a cracking read and now I cannot wait to see the film and from what I have seen of it from the trailer there are a few subtle differences so it should be well worth seeing.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Mark Watney is one of the astronauts on the Ares 3 mission to Mars. Unfortunately, when the Ares 3 mission leaves, Mark is left behind, presumed dead. The fact that he isn’t dead comes as a bit of shock to him at first, and then he is left pondering how, or even whether, he can survive. He knows there is another mission planned but calculating his food supplies and other equipment he doesn’t believe he can survive until the Ares 4 mission lands, and even if he does the scheduled landing site is far away; how could he even get there if he is still alive? Keeping a detailed log of his days on Mars he struggles to set up some way firstly to keep himself alive, and only then does he consider communications. Can he contact anyone? What can they do to help him, even if he gets through?

In between, Mark attempts to keep his spirits up; each of the astronauts had personal music, movies, tv series on entertainment systems, so Mark can keep himself entertained wondering why Sherrif Rosco doesn’t just go to the Duke farm and arrest the boys when they’re not in the General Lee. It’s not until we’re about 50 pages into the book that we leave Mark’s log entries temporarily, to go to Earth, where at Mission Control they are commemorating his death. From there, the book alternates between both locations.

I really liked Mark as a character; he’s clearly intelligent; a botanist and an astronaut, he has the know-how and is enough of a geek to give things a go; after all, he has nothing to lose and everything to gain if he can find ways to survive. He has an irreverent sense of humour and this comes across in his log entries. Having never been stranded on Mars, I have no idea how it may impact on a person’s mindset; but I felt that the log entries Mark creates are indicative of a man who is a survivalist, but has a touch of pragmatism in him as well. I don’t really know why some reviewers have complained about the bad language in the book; there really wasn’t very much so that it became an issue, and I think I’d swear if I was stranded on a planet that was doing its darnedest to kill me too. It seems to me that some reviewers have not taken into account the mental, emotional and physical strain that we have to imagine the character undergoing in this situation, coupled with his sheer will to survive and prove the odds wrong.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book; following Mark’s log entries explaining his thinking through solutions to his problems. I think these log entries were partly a way for Mark to ‘think out loud’ as he worked through each issue and as such they give us a really good view into his mindset. I found myself cheering with each triumph, and feeling crushed with each blow. The incident with the airlock some way into the book nearly made me weep with frustration. A great book; I can’t wait for more books by this clearly talented author who has written what I found to be an intelligent and thought-provoking sci-fi novel.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Mark Watney is one of the astronauts on the Ares 3 mission to Mars. Unfortunately, when the Ares 3 mission leaves, Mark is left behind, presumed dead. The fact that he isn’t dead comes as a bit of shock to him at first, and then he is left pondering how, or even whether, he can survive. He knows there is another mission planned but calculating his food supplies and other equipment he doesn’t believe he can survive until the Ares 4 mission lands, and even if he does the scheduled landing site is far away; how could he even get there if he is still alive? Keeping a detailed log of his days on Mars he struggles to set up some way firstly to keep himself alive, and only then does he consider communications. Can he contact anyone? What can they do to help him, even if he gets through?

In between, Mark attempts to keep his spirits up; each of the astronauts had personal music, movies, tv series on entertainment systems, so Mark can keep himself entertained wondering why Sherrif Rosco doesn’t just go to the Duke farm and arrest the boys when they’re not in the General Lee. It’s not until we’re about 50 pages into the book that we leave Mark’s log entries temporarily, to go to Earth, where at Mission Control they are commemorating his death. From there, the book alternates between both locations.

I really liked Mark as a character; he’s clearly intelligent; a botanist and an astronaut, he has the know-how and is enough of a geek to give things a go; after all, he has nothing to lose and everything to gain if he can find ways to survive. He has an irreverent sense of humour and this comes across in his log entries. Having never been stranded on Mars, I have no idea how it may impact on a person’s mindset; but I felt that the log entries Mark creates are indicative of a man who is a survivalist, but has a touch of pragmatism in him as well. I don’t really know why some reviewers have complained about the bad language in the book; there really wasn’t very much so that it became an issue, and I think I’d swear if I was stranded on a planet that was doing its darnedest to kill me too. It seems to me that some reviewers have not taken into account the mental, emotional and physical strain that we have to imagine the character undergoing in this situation, coupled with his sheer will to survive and prove the odds wrong.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book; following Mark’s log entries explaining his thinking through solutions to his problems. I think these log entries were partly a way for Mark to ‘think out loud’ as he worked through each issue and as such they give us a really good view into his mindset. I found myself cheering with each triumph, and feeling crushed with each blow. The incident with the airlock some way into the book nearly made me weep with frustration. A great book; I can’t wait for more books by this clearly talented author who has written what I found to be an intelligent and thought-provoking sci-fi novel.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
57 of 62 people found the following review helpful
on 18 April 2013
This novel has a great premise, which is in many ways it greatest strength. Weir is great at delivering technical information in his writing style, and a great part of the text is quite technical. But it's succinct, and is never bogged down with advanced vocabulary. However, if you are not looking for a story that talks a lot about the technicalities and issues of space travel and inter-planetary exploration, this book is not for you.
The story itself is good, switching between the main characters life on mars, and the events of those back on earth adds a refreshing change of pace at key points which keeps the reader engaged. Do not expect a deeply philosophical approach to difficulties faced by a lone human on a barren world, you wont be getting it. Life alone on Mars is described by Mark Watney, a likable and quick witted botanist, who likes to keep things simple, and humorous.
All in all, this book will interest the sci-fi fan, and will appeal to the casual reader, such as myself, looking for a new and refreshing story.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
141 of 154 people found the following review helpful
on 5 February 2013
NASA has set up a chain of expeditions to Mars but very soon after landing the third one is aborted and the scientists have to leave. Unknown to them their dead companion, who is not actually dead, finds himself stranded on Mars with little hope of surviving until the next scheduled mission. Air and water are not the problem but he does not have enough food despite being left with the resources to accommodate six explorers.

Right from the start this is a gripping page-turner and no matter how hard Mark Watney strives to survive Mars works just as hard to kill him. All the time I was willing him to succeed only to have yet another believable crisis threatening his continued existence. In my opinion you will not find a better thriller set on Mars or elsewhere. I had not previously heard of the author and cannot remember how I ended up buying his book to read on my Ipad, but it was a good day. Highly recommended, excellent value for money, and I look forward to reading other work from Weir.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 27 December 2014
A great story, cross between Apollo 13 and Gravity, definitely movie material. Nearly gave it 5 stars as it was very gripping and a good read. The one minus for me was the main character is rather one dimensional. Although I grew to like him, and the humour had me crack a smile a few times, I felt the need to write in some prose of my own. Perfect setting for philosophical arguments in his head, for looking out at the stars and wondering which dot may actually be his home planet. Mars must have some beauty about it, even if only the setting sun, or a view of its two moons, anything! And surely his situation would make him cycle through a plethora of human emotions - anger, sadness, downright depression, bitterness, hope, misery, despair, acceptance, fear, loneliness, cycling round with some good days in between? Instead he seemed mostly to crack jokes or swear at things!

Still, I would highly recommend this book, and if you don't understand the science, ignore it.....the story is good enough to please engineers and sci fi fans alike. Enjoy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 27 July 2015
This is extended novel version. Our narrator even references the event ("NASA learned their lesson... all filters are interchangable").
There is a lot of excessive technical detail thrown about - I didn't really care about the square footage of soil required to grow 952 potatoes, and considering he insists on "sparing [us] the math", he relies an awful lot on the minutia of statistics and other mathematical details. But that doesn't always detract from the story - it's this detail that means we are more able to understand the desperate improvisation required to stay alive so many miles from Earth, when no one else realises he's still alive. He has to survive knowing that rescue is NOT immediately on its way.
I actually enjoyed this story. I wanted to know what happened, how Mark would keep going long enough to make contact with Earth again, overcoming all the incredible bad (and good) luck that dogs the 400+ days he might end up stranded on an alien planet . Yes, there are certain parts where the characters grated, or slipped into unbelievability, but the underlying plot was strong enough for me to grit my teeth and get through these occasional niggles. I even liked the narrative technique of leaving us alone with only Mark's log for a significant portion of the novel, stranding us with just one perspective of the whole event just as Mark is stranded. [small spoiler - after about halfway through we start getting a third person narrative of the events back on Earth, focusing on their rescue/recovery efforts].
I wouldn't call this the greatest work of literature. It's been made into a movie, directed by Ridley Scott and is already being compared to Prometheus (for both good and bad) - and I would agree that it's a mixed bag, some people are going to hate this, others are going to find it an enjoyable piece of action. Personally, I read until it was finished, and was happy enough with the conclusion. I won't recommend this, but I won't try and put anyone off either.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Mark Watney is one of the astronauts on the Ares 3 mission to Mars. Unfortunately, when the Ares 3 mission leaves, Mark is left behind, presumed dead. The fact that he isn’t dead comes as a bit of shock to him at first, and then he is left pondering how, or even whether, he can survive. He knows there is another mission planned but calculating his food supplies and other equipment he doesn’t believe he can survive until the Ares 4 mission lands, and even if he does the scheduled landing site is far away; how could he even get there if he is still alive? Keeping a detailed log of his days on Mars he struggles to set up some way firstly to keep himself alive, and only then does he consider communications. Can he contact anyone? What can they do to help him, even if he gets through?

In between, Mark attempts to keep his spirits up; each of the astronauts had personal music, movies, tv series on entertainment systems, so Mark can keep himself entertained wondering why Sherrif Rosco doesn’t just go to the Duke farm and arrest the boys when they’re not in the General Lee. It’s not until we’re about 50 pages into the book that we leave Mark’s log entries temporarily, to go to Earth, where at Mission Control they are commemorating his death. From there, the book alternates between both locations.

I really liked Mark as a character; he’s clearly intelligent; a botanist and an astronaut, he has the know-how and is enough of a geek to give things a go; after all, he has nothing to lose and everything to gain if he can find ways to survive. He has an irreverent sense of humour and this comes across in his log entries. Having never been stranded on Mars, I have no idea how it may impact on a person’s mindset; but I felt that the log entries Mark creates are indicative of a man who is a survivalist, but has a touch of pragmatism in him as well. I don’t really know why some reviewers have complained about the bad language in the book; there really wasn’t very much so that it became an issue, and I think I’d swear if I was stranded on a planet that was doing its darnedest to kill me too. It seems to me that some reviewers have not taken into account the mental, emotional and physical strain that we have to imagine the character undergoing in this situation, coupled with his sheer will to survive and prove the odds wrong.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book; following Mark’s log entries explaining his thinking through solutions to his problems. I think these log entries were partly a way for Mark to ‘think out loud’ as he worked through each issue and as such they give us a really good view into his mindset. I found myself cheering with each triumph, and feeling crushed with each blow. The incident with the airlock some way into the book nearly made me weep with frustration. A great book; I can’t wait for more books by this clearly talented author who has written what I found to be an intelligent and thought-provoking sci-fi novel.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 28 January 2014
As usual I received this book free of charge in exchange for a review, this time from NetGalley. Also as usual I will give my candid thoughts below.

The plot of this one is basically Castaway plus any movie you've ever seen set on Mars. Guy's marooned on Mars and only has his wits to survive the situation.

On the positive side the level of detail here is amazingly intricate and the author tells you every single detail of every cliff-hanging situation and its eventual resolution. Also, the main character is one of those rare individuals who responds to stress with humor so the book manages to be quite funny in its way despite the rather grim situation being faced.

To the negative, the science in this book is OK but at times left me scratching my head in perplexity. It's obvious the author has done his homework but there were more than a few holes. For the most part I managed to ignore them but anyone who is hyper-technical will likely be inflamed at the whole thing. Finally, after a while the meticulous detail tended to be rather draining. I started and finished this book in a single 5-hour sitting and by the end I was just exhausted and ready for it to end. I highly recommend that you do NOT attempt that.

In summary, this book has a great premise and pretty good execution for a book so intimately tied to science content. I also have absolute confidence that this will become a movie (if it hasn't already) so look for it in the theatre eventually.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 27 July 2015
My first review on Amazon so here goes - the premise of the noval is OK as far as it goes, although by the nature of the plot a lot of the book is very procedural (I did this, then this, then this etc...) and some of the detail is unnecessary in places. The pacing of the story has a few issues, as does the ending which is entirely predicable. My main gripe was with the dialogue which is fairly awful (we are supposed to believe a NASA autonaught talks and behaves like a teenage boy), having said that as something to read on a plane or holiday it does the job.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.

     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Egg
The Egg by Andy Weir


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.