Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
95
4.2 out of 5 stars
Format: Blu-ray|Change
Price:£21.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

VINE VOICEon 11 February 2004
The screenplay of this film was a colloboration between director Neil Jordan (Interview With A Vampire, The Crying Game) and feminist author Angela Carter, and is based upon a short story by Carter from her collection of short stories 'The Bloody Chamber'. This story, in turn, is based upon the classic children's story 'Little Red Riding Hood', but is filled with dark, menacing, and sexual imagery, all of which are used in the screenplay to create this stunning piece of gothic 'horror'.
That said, I always balk when I see this film placed in the 'Horror' section of any store, and cringe whenever I read a synopsis describing this film as a story about werewolves. Both descriptions are very wide of the mark. This is a story about the transition from childhood to adulthood of a teenage girl, and the symbolism throughout the film is subtle and powerful simultaneously. As such, it pretty much goes without saying that if you are looking for a scary movie, you're probably in the wrong place.
The highlights of this movie are:- Angela Lansbury as 'Granny', who turns in a wonderful performance and really adds a touch of class to the film. Also, the set design and lighting is brilliant, evoking a truly gothic feel to the scenes. For example, most of the movie is based 'outdoors' (like in the woods or in the village), and yet you always get the feeling of an enclosed and somewhat foreboding environment. This feels exactly right given that the story is centred around the character of a young girl, whose world consists solely of the small and familiar surroundings of home, where the outside world is only known to her through the fantastic stories of her Grandmother, where men, wolves and 'straying from the path' are to be feared.
Another, and major, highlight of this movie is the wonderful soundtrack by George Fenton, which is worth having on CD itself. Combining adaptations of traditional folk music with eerie, ominous synth sounds does as much to enhance the gothic atmosphere as the visual effects and set design.
Other than that, the rest of the performances are generally pretty good, especially Neil Jordan's staple actor, Stephen Rea, as well as a fine cameo from Brian Glover and debut from the beautiful and talented Sarah Patterson as the lead charcter 'Rosaleen', who sadly hasn't done much else since as far as I know. The film is also quite famous for it's man-to-wolf scenes and an early use of animatronics. The effects, sadly, do look pretty dated now, but the context of the scenes in which they are used is untainted, and remain powerful scenes both visually and emotionally. The fact that Rosaleen, after witnessing the pain and anquish that such a transition entails, openly weeps and says 'I'm sorry, I didn't know a wolf could cry', is brilliantly emotional and indicative of her almost complete transition from unknowing child, to compassionate and knowing young adult.
All in all, this is a great movie that is so full of rich imagery and subtlety, that it promises to provide great re-watch value, and should not be considered as a 'horror-flick'... unfortunately, most stores don't have a section entitled 'Enchanting fantasy gothic adult fairytale stories'...
Sadly, the DVD isn't great. The packaging is pretty dreadful, with a lame colour drawing adorning the cover. The menu is something straight out of Hammer House Of Horror, and is daft. Annoyingly, the film is in 4:3 aspect ratio, despite a tantalising opening sequence which is in 16:9 widescreen, but sadly, as soon as the film begins proper, we are snapped back into pan and scan...The extras are not wonderful, but there is an extended trailer, which actually contains some different versions of scenes that made it into the final cut. These include a scene where Rosaleen reveals her age (13 and a half), which doesn't appear anywhere in the actual film!
By the way, this great film IS AVAILABLE ON REGION 2, and you can usually pick it up on Amazon Marketplace or ZShops, albeit at a slightly inflated price.
0Comment| 41 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 July 2011
Being one of my favourite films of all time, I was eagerly awaiting the Blu-ray edition, but was severely disappointed as the quality of Blu-ray transfer. The manufacturer/production company have clearly made no attempt to restore/remaster the frames of film, as there are myriad white, glowing specks springing forth on most scenes. I compared the Blu-ray to the DVD Special Edition I had from 2005 and there is only a fractional improvement in the image resolution with the Blu-ray. To compound matters the DVD Special Edition bizarrely had more extra features. The Blu-ray does have a superior sound stage though, but it's not worth buying it for this alone.

This is not the first time a Blu-ray I've bought has not adequately surpassed the production quality of a DVD. There is no excuse for it, other than profiteering, as older films like Zulu are superlative on Blu-ray. The companies who own the rights to licence films for the Blu-ray market should demonstrate greater conscience and only release films on Blu-ray after a convincing restoration/remastering job from the original film production master.
0Comment| 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 July 2009
I'm a fan of this film (wonderful atmosphere, riveting special effects, lots of dry humour) but I was disappointed with the Blu-ray. It's not a film that boasts stunning image quality, and it was difficult to see the difference between this and the average standard definition DVD.

As the extras are limited to a director's commentary, I would advise saving some money by purchasing the much cheaper standard DVD.
0Comment| 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 October 2015
Really disappointed in the awful picture and sound quality for a Blu Ray, The quality is of a DVD standard and the sound is the same. It also actually has LESS extras than the DVD. ITV are purely trying to cash in without putting in the effort. I have the steel case version on DVD so if you do too, stick with it. The Blu Ray is a total waste of money. Shame really as I love the film itself and would of loved to have seen it in remastered pristine glory, alas, it was nowhere near.
22 comments| 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 October 2005
I was first introduced to this film a few years ago when a friend let me watch it and i instantly fell in love with it. After trying for ages to find it on DVD (in the UK) i gave up on it, but now it's finally out (which is about time giving that this is a British film and was on DVD in America years ago - though nothing to this). Although made in the 80's, this film looks surprisingly modern and excellent quality in it's transfer to DVD.
This surreal movie is based on the fairy tale - Little Red Riding Hood but is a horror movie with underlying themes of feminsim. Rosaleen (Sarah Patterson), while dreaming, enters a magnificant world where everything in her life (and bedroom) seems to make some sort of confusing appearance. She spends most of her time with her Granny listening to old wives tales about wolves and witches - which we see played out and which are quite creepy but well done. Rosaleen has been warned by Granny not to stray from the path and to beware men who's eyebrows meet in the middle - with good reason. But it is only when she ignores this advice that horrific events take place leading to an excellent climax to the story which will never be forgotten.
This movie has many pro's to outweigh the cons (which are few and far between). The special effects, though nothing to today's, are excellent for when it was made, the acting in the film remains at a high standard throughout and the scenery is excellent and just what you'd expect from something set in a fairy tale land. But, what steals the film for me is the presence of the wonderful Angela Lansbury as Granny. Her performance is brilliant and she's played as quite a brutal yet loveable character - which stands out and you can't help but love her.
This film is rated 18 for a reason and it is an adult film which kids shouldn't watch until they are older. The film will not appeal to everyone and has become a bit of a cult classic which explains the DVD release of this film - demand by those who love it.
The packaging for the DVD is very cool, a steel metal case with a collectors booklet and some nice artwork inside the packet - worth the buy for the presentation alone.
I do strongly recommend this film as i don't think it's very well known and it really does deserve the recognition.
0Comment| 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 12 June 2003
The screenplay of this film was a colloboration between director Neil Jordan (Interview With A Vampire, The Crying Game) and feminist author Angela Carter, and is based upon a short story by Carter from her collection of short stories 'The Bloody Chamber'. This story, in turn, is based upon the classic children's story 'Little Red Riding Hood', but is filled with dark, menacing, and sexual imagery, all of which are used in the screenplay to create this stunning piece of gothic 'horror'.
That said, I always balk when I see this film placed in the 'Horror' section of any store, and cringe whenever I read a synopsis describing this film as a story about werewolves. Both descriptions are very wide of the mark. This is a story about the transition from childhood to adulthood of a teenage girl, and the symbolism throughout the film is subtle and powerful simultaneously. As such, it pretty much goes without saying that if you are looking for a scary movie, you're probably in the wrong place.
The highlights of this movie are:- Angela Lansbury as 'Granny', who turns in a wonderful performance and really adds a touch of class to the film. Also, the set design and lighting is brilliant, evoking a truly gothic feel to the scenes. For example, most of the movie is based 'outdoors' (like in the woods or in the village), and yet you always get the feeling of an enclosed and somewhat foreboding environment. This feels exactly right given that the story is centred around the character of a young girl, whose world consists solely of the small and familiar surroundings of home, where the outside world is only known to her through the fantastic stories of her Grandmother, where men, wolves and 'straying from the path' are to be feared.
Another, and major, highlight of this movie is the wonderful soundtrack by George Fenton, which is worth having on CD itself. Combining adaptations of traditional folk music with eerie, ominous synth sounds does as much to enhance the gothic atmosphere as the visual effects and set design.
Other than that, the rest of the performances are generally pretty good, especially Neil Jordan's staple actor, Stephen Rea, as well as a fine cameo from Brian Glover and debut from the beautiful and talented Sarah Patterson as the lead charcter 'Rosaleen', who sadly hasn't done much else since as far as I know. The film is also quite famous for it's man-to-wolf scenes and an early use of animatronics. The effects, sadly, do look pretty dated now, but the context of the scenes in which they are used is untainted, and remain powerful scenes both visually and emotionally. The fact that Rosaleen, after witnessing the pain and anquish that such a transition entails, openly weeps and says 'I'm sorry, I didn't know a wolf could cry', is brilliantly emotional and indicative of her almost complete transition from unknowing child, to compassionate and knowing young adult.
All in all, this is a great movie that is so full of rich imagery and subtlety, that it promises to provide great re-watch value, and should not be considered as a 'horror-flick'... unfortunately, most stores don't have a section entitled 'Enchanting fantasy gothic adult fairytale stories'...
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 31 December 2005
at last, the powers that be have decided to release this on dvd! This film from 1984 is a tour de force of special effects. Darkly brooding and irrestible, it takes the viewer on a labyrinthine journey through the underworld of adolescent sexual awakenings. Angela Carter's story, based as it is on the grimmest of Grimm's fairy tales, lopes along at a ravening pace, captivating, seducing and generally takes no prisoners, devours everything in its wake! This is all the more surprising because the film was made with a cast of mostly unknown actors, ably backed by stalwarts such as Angela Lansbury and David Warner. However, there's not a bad performance in the bunch, with special praise reserved for Stephen Rea and Danielle Dax, and an extra but pat on the back for Neil Jordan. The filming manages to be both opulent and sombre, the script is tight and the music score spot on...it's just a pity that company of wolves has mouldered away for so long before - thank the Gods! - it was released for the DVD market. A cult classic, and rightly so, this film is a delectable feast for the discerning viewer, and just the right movie for that post Xmas New Year feeling...
0Comment| 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 November 2012
The Company of Wolves is simply a stunning visual and narrative treat for both horror and arthouse fans, and is definitely one of the best British films ever made.

Bringing together the humorous witchery of the awesome Angela Carter and the sensitive intractable beauty of Neil Jordan's direction, the art department's superlative recreation of the fairy tale dream forest, and the suitably gory visual effects, which really were quite splendid for 1984, all combine to produce a funny, frightening, at times deliberately anachronistic, labyrinth of images and folk tales, and if its ever Freudian, it is so only with its tongue firmly in its cheek.

Carter's genius script takes the myth of the werewolf and the red riding hood tale as starting points for a sublime journey into the psycho-sexual fantasies of a teenage girl, which whilst they initially seem to lead one to the point of cliche suddenly perform psychic transformations which breathe marvellous new life into the matrices of gender and sexual politics. Don't get me wrong, the film is not a heavy thesis dressed up as pantomime, but a throughly intellectual and artistic treat that can be enjoyed on many levels.

The 18 rating is misleading and too restrictive these days as the film will very much appeal to thoughtful teenagers as much as adults, much as it did in the 80s - it really does not contain any material which could be deemed as 'adults only'. Parents will know if their children are mature enough to enter into this kind of contemplation.

The blu-ray transfer is wonderfully sharp, bringing out all the superlative detail and design in sets and costumes, and the sound is crisp and clear - a huge improvement on any previous dvd release. Great commentary from Jordan as he recounts his magical collaboration with the much-missed Carter, and whilst any other extras a sadly thin on the ground, this doesn't detract from the fact that this film is an essential purchase and should be part of any film fan's collection.
11 comment| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 September 2006
Based on a short story by Angela Carter, this film delves into a grim fairy-tale world laced with themes of good and evil. 'If there is a beast in man, then it has it's equal in woman.'

Contains mesmerising scenes of slow-motion wolves, and some good effects (though not by todays computerific standards).

The main quality, however, is the narrative. It dips in and out, jumps from story to story, but never loses your attention.

This is how I imagine little red riding hood was supposed to be told - grim - scary - darkly fantastic.
0Comment| 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
HALL OF FAMEon 21 August 2007
The Company of Wolves, Neil Jordan's violent retelling of the Little Red Riding Hood tale, is weird, wonderful and gorgeously photographed. It's a story of a young girl's transition to adulthood, with all the sexual awakening and conflicted feelings one might suppose. This part of the story is told with great empathy and imagination. However, be prepared for werewolves, gore, creepy woods and creepy characters. It's hard to tell who's more unsettling, the wolves or granny. A very good movie. The DVD transfer is quite watchable.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)