Ian.S.

This man lives in the past!
Helpful votes received on reviews: 98% (48 of 49)
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 52,739 - Total Helpful Votes: 48 of 49
Sophocles: Oedipus Tyrannus (Cambridge Translation&hellip by Sophocles
As with the others in this series, the format is easily understandable. Context, the Greek theatre are quickly explained. The commentary on the facing page once again is written in a simple but effective style. The authors highlight problems and give food for thought allowing the student to discuss options between themselves of situations etc portrayed in the play.

The translation is modern and very much understood. Any odd expressions or words that require clarification are done so in a clear and direct style. This allows this translation to be used in actual performance.The line numbers do not match the originals, but each page informs the reader off those original line… Read more
The Aeneid (York Notes Advanced series) by Virgil
It is best to say what this book isn't. it is not a detailed commentary. it is not a lengthy academic study of epic, or Virgil or themes or anything of that sort.

What it is , is a very useful and handy general guide to West's translation. West's translation omits any useful notes and guide, the result is, if one wants to have clarifications, one needs to check out other commentaries etc. This guide however, is the guide as it is written solely by Robin Sowerby, based on West's book.

It packs a lot of information for the A level student in 120 pages. The commentary itself is only about 36 pages long, so no great detail, but it does provide basic information and… Read more
Ovid As An Epic Poet by Brooks Otis
Ovid As An Epic Poet by Brooks Otis
4.0 out of 5 stars Ovid, a complex character, 15 April 2014
This Second Edition was a considerable re-write of the First. The author demonstrates his considerable knowledge of poetry and applying that with regard to Ovid and Metamorphoses. In particular, he wishes to associate Ovid and his style with that of his recent counterpart Virgil in respect of 'epic' style.

Further he provides a perceived structure in the construction of Ovid's epic, and this is a theme that runs throughout the book. The first part being god-driven actions, then an age of heroes and then an age of man, as his epic reaches down to Augustan times.

The vengeful gods are replaced by inadequate heroes and humans as victim. His chapters on the wrath of gods… Read more

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