Sunjata

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 67% (50 of 75)
Location: London
 

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Top Reviewer Ranking: 667,369 - Total Helpful Votes: 50 of 75
Count Arthur Strong [DVD] <b>DVD</b> ~ Steve Delaney
Count Arthur Strong [DVD] DVD ~ Steve Delaney
15 of 24 people found the following review helpful
Count Arthur Strong is a brilliant comic creation and I was really excited about a TV version of the radio series. But what has emerged is a real mess. There are still laugh-out loud moments in every episode, all of which come from the Count. But Steve Delaney isn't given nearly enough screen-time, which is instead devoted to a cast of two-dimensional characters in a local cafe. These include the grumpy cafe owner (a rip-off of Seinfeld's soup Nazi?) and a conspiracy theorist who couldn't tell that his wife was having an affair (a rip-off of King of the Hill?). Worse, the general idea that the Count causes chaos wherever he goes has been diluted with sentiment, and unearned pathos and a… Read more
The Last Train to Scarborough (Jim Stringer Steam &hellip by Andrew Martin
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
This is an excellent addition to the steam detective series - and a return to form after the slightly disappointing Death on a Branch Line. Martin has a real knack for creating seedy but believable supporting characters, and the Paradise guesthouse in Scarborough is home to some of his best. The language is as evocative as ever, and Jim Stringer remains a compelling and complex narrator.
The End Of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas
The End Of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas
28 of 41 people found the following review helpful
At 500 pages, this book is at least 470 pages too long. What might have made for a satisfying Calvino or Borges-style short story becomes instead an enormous chore to read. It is padded out with very dull scenes, navel-gazing from the unsympathetic narrator, and - worst of all - page after page of pseudo-intellectual name-dropping and metaphysical ramblings on life, the universe and everything. Derrida is mentioned with such monotonous regularity that I first assumed that the author had done it as a bet - but it soon transpires that the book is as humourless, delusional and self-important as the 'philosopher' himself. Avoid unless you are a faculty member in an English Literature… Read more

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