Darkwinter

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 94% (306 of 326)
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 52,372 - Total Helpful Votes: 306 of 326
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
5.0 out of 5 stars "Nome", 22 Dec 2011
Where to start? Anyone reading this - READ THIS BOOK.

Before I read To Kill a Mockingbird, I knew very little about the book: it came highly recommended and had something about racism in the south of the USA.

Added facts for the next readers: its about FAR more. Its set in the 1930's depression and you follow the curious (and silly?) ways of adults through the eyes of an 8 year old bright, tomboy `laidy'.

Its so hard to review this book. Its fantastic on so many levels, in a whole plethora of different ways - I just wish I could post a picture of a man with his jaw dropped open and speechless - certainly a feeling many people must have felt when attempting… Read more
The Stranger by Albert Camus
The Stranger by Albert Camus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, 21 Dec 2011
The Stranger is a story of an 'ordinary' man and the justice system.

This book does not 'guide' you through like a 12 year old, you must read between the lines and acquire your own thoughts.

The author lets you come to your own conclusions. He gives you little evidence for the crime, or the motivations, and as the reader, you know all the events leading up to the crime.

What is stark, is the way you relive all this evidence and the events through the words of the lawyers, the how an ordinary mans mannerisms and 'ways' are used against him.

I regard myself as an 'ordinary' man, who knows little about the justice system (similar to the protagonist)… Read more
The Constant Gardener by John Le Carré
The Constant Gardener by John Le Carré
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
To long! Far to slow and over HALF the book is a repeat.

The entire story is told in the first 150 pages, in quite an exciting fashion.

The following pages (the majority of the book) the protagonist, Justin, visits all the characters which were afore mentioned in the first 150 pages. You follow him from Africa, to Europe to Canada following up the characters, which have been described before. There is NOTHING thrilling about reconfirming characters and the information characters have.

It is like Le Carre has told the story for intelligent people in the first 150 pages. For people who have not understood the story in the first 150 pages - read on, Le Carre… Read more

Wish List