K. Gordon

(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   (REAL NAME)
 
Top Reviewer Ranking: 354
Helpful votes received on reviews: 88% (1,514 of 1,729)

 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 354 - Total Helpful Votes: 1514 of 1729
Computer Chess (Masters of Cinema) (DVD & BLU-RAY &hellip <b>Blu-ray</b> ~ Andrew BUJALSKI
This low key mockumentary is so dry in itís humor that itís more likely to produce a nostalgic or rueful smile than a belly laugh. Set at a 1980s man vs. computer chess competition, and shot on what looks like a video camera from the time, it certainly succeeds in capturing a time, place and atmosphere.

On the other hand, some of it starts to get a bit repetitive and meandering. Unlike Christopher Guestís hysterical mockumentaries, this is so close to Ďrealí for much of itís length that it started to wear down a bit. And then when it switches to a more Ďover-the-topí tone, as when one of the young leads is hit on by a pair of middle-aged swingers, it suddenly feels like a… Read more
The Suspended Step of the Stork - THEO ANGELOPOULO&hellip <b>DVD</b> ~ Marcello Mastroianni
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
On first viewing, this was not an Angelopoulos film I loved. Of course it looks great, that's a given. But the first time around, the seeming central story line seemed almost tacked on. A journalist is tracking Marcello Mastroianni, who may or may not be a famous politician and philosophic author who simply vanished one day, to a refugee zone on the edge of the Greek border, where he lives in squalor with the others there. The problem, for me, was that the Mastroianni mystery was far less powerful and interesting then the stories of those around him, who aren't refugees by choice, but in order just to survive. So, for me, it felt we were focused on the wrong plot, or certainly the more… Read more
The Suspended Step of the Stork [Region 2 IMPORT] <b>DVD</b> ~ Theo Angelopoulos
On first viewing, this was not an Angelopoulos film I loved. Of course it looks great, that's a given. But the first time around, the seeming central story line seemed almost tacked on. A journalist is tracking Marcello Mastroianni, who may or may not be a famous politician and philosophic author who simply vanished one day, to a refugee zone on the edge of the Greek border, where he lives in squalor with the others there. The problem, for me, was that the Mastroianni mystery was far less powerful and interesting then the stories of those around him, who aren't refugees by choice, but in order just to survive. So, for me, it felt we were focused on the wrong plot, or certainly the more… Read more