Margie F

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 87% (66 of 76)
Location: Bahrain
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,944,271 - Total Helpful Votes: 66 of 76
The Art of Travel by Alain de Botton
The Art of Travel by Alain de Botton
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a perfect beach read, 14 Nov 2006
A dip of the toe into philosophy via art, literature and Expedia. De Botton has a knack of making his readers feel clever, regardless of whether or not you have any prior knowledge of the works of art being referenced in each chapter. Which is a very clever thing to be able to do. His observations are largely common sense and entirely understandable (beginning with the premise that when you travel, you unavoidably take with you the thing that you may most wish to leave behind - yourself). His style of writing is endearing; descriptive, funny and frank. It's not a book to change your life, but it is a wholly appropriate and very pleasurable beach read.
Black Swan Green by David Mitchell
Black Swan Green by David Mitchell
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Having devoured Mitchell's previous works - and having a particularly soft spot for Ghostwritten - I was pleased that to have read `less than perfect' reviews before buying. Prepared for disappointment, it should be acknowledged that it is only the strength of Mitchell's previous work that makes BSG seem a lesser book, which is hardly a criticism. It feels like a first novel (a comment that is difficult to apply to Ghostwritten). A tale of adolescent angst and personal development, it is almost as if this was something that Mitchell had to write before he could move on to bigger and better things with the next novel (whatever that may be). An exorcism of a book.
Bulletproof Suzy by Ian Brotherhood
Bulletproof Suzy by Ian Brotherhood
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Visual, violent and vociferous, Bulletproof Suzy has won itself (herself) a place in my affections. This book is full of dark passageways, rain-heavy skies, concrete tower blocks - it's almost unremittingly bleak and grey. So heavy is it on the monochrome (Suzy and her brooding crew of `little ladies' dress only in black and white, and even their hair seems to come soley in shades of platinum or ebony) that the use of colour when it does appear - in the names of the tower blocks that our anti-heroine and her pals live in; Magenta, Cherry, Cerulean - acts like the red coat in Shindler's List. It is suddenly shot-through with a Technicolor wakeup call.

Brotherhood's first novel is… Read more