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ACB (swansea)

(TOP 50 REVIEWER)
 
Top Reviewer Ranking: 23
Helpful votes received on reviews: 91% (8,023 of 8,796)
In My Own Words:
There is so much to learn (and forget, unfortunately). I review as I enjoy it, but also to remind me of some the books, films, music that my grey cells may have misplaced.

Interests
Many. Now have time since retirement. Medicine, haematology and psychology degrees. Science, films, Hollywood musicals. Sport, fitness, , nutrition . Avid reader. All music, with a love of jazz from all eras but am open to anything new in any me… Read more
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 23 - Total Helpful Votes: 8023 of 8796
The Wisden Guide to International Cricket 2014: Th&hellip by Steven Lynch
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top-Class Production., 11 Mar 2014
This is another Wisden wonder. A Pocket guide taking the reader from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe encompassing player profiles of those you know and the obscure participants that you may have never have heard of. Not just for the committed aficionado, this is a well-produced guide to players that is pocket-sized and will fill many a break, whether lunch, tea or bad-light at the match as well as being informative at home. Great value.
The Runaway Woman by Josephine Cox
The Runaway Woman by Josephine Cox
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Discovering herself again after a devastating experience, Lucy Lovejoy has a big ask. Her self-confidence has been dented by personal problems .Her marriage is in tatters with infidelity and children who are disconcerting. Her enthusiasm is re-kindled by her friend, Kathleen. This is an enticing read but lacks the bite of the author's previous novels. Enjoyable enough, but the grit of sustaining the interest of the narrative is predictable. The search for self-satisfaction into unknown territories are well-depicted, if somewhat drawn out to a less than feasible end.
The Silversmith's Wife by Sophia Tobin
The Silversmith's Wife by Sophia Tobin
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
On a winter night in 1792, a night-watchman stands in Berkeley Square. At Edward Rigby's feet lies the body of Pierre Reynard, a respected Silversmith. His throat cut and his pockets empty, it seems a robbery gone wrong. The victim kept a diary that links the proceedings into a more complex story. Reynard had many enemies. His wife, Mary and Digby are pivotal to the narrative. Mary states that her husband was a stranger when she married him and a stranger when he died. The author spins a story that is interesting and keeps the reader attentive. It is somewhat pedestrian at times, but the lead up to the circumstances and identity of the murderer maintains an entertaining read.