Paul Bowes

(TOP 500 REVIEWER)
 
Top Reviewer Ranking: 435
Helpful votes received on reviews: 89% (1,412 of 1,590)
Location: Wales, United Kingdom

 

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Top Reviewer Ranking: 435 - Total Helpful Votes: 1412 of 1590
The Children Act by Ian McEwan
The Children Act by Ian McEwan
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
'The Children Act' is a brief novel - really a novella - set in the legal world. The principal character is a judge specialising in cases involving children. As the book opens, she is performing her professional duties while dealing with the strain of the potential collapse of her marriage.

Ian McEwan has clearly done a great deal of research for this book, but I didn't feel that the story ever became merely a vehicle for hard-earned detail. The central character is convincingly inhabited, and the conflict that McEwan sets up when the clear and ordered world of the law is required to deal with the messy world of human emotions generates real tension.

Nonetheless, I… Read more
Flight to Arras (Penguin Modern Classics) by Antoine Saint-Exupery
'Flight to Arras' (originally 'Pilote de guerre') appeared in 1942 and was almost immediately translated into English. The present edition offers a newer (1995) translation.

The book is an account of a single, near-suicidal reconnaissance mission flown by Saint-Exupéry and two colleagues during the Fall of France in 1940. It blends a gripping boys-own adventure with the author's personal and philosophical reflections on war, on community, and on what it meant at this dark time to be French.

The style will be familiar to anybody familiar with the author's other books, though 'Flight to Arras' is less obviously novelistic than the earlier books that made his name… Read more
The French Revolution: A Very Short Introduction (&hellip by William Doyle
This is a good short introduction to the subject. William Doyle provides an account of events - a timeline is supplied - but concentrates on the lasting significance of the French Revolution. There is an even-handed discussion of the origins of the event, and of the historiography of the Revolution inside and outside France. The bibliography is up-to-date, as of publication, and a useful guide for further reading. The book is readable for the non-specialist.