Michael Heyman

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 83% (15 of 18)
Web Page: www.tui-na.co.uk
In My Own Words:
Practitioner of traditional Chinese healing arts based in Glossop and Manchester.

Interests
Healing arts, meditation, qi gong, history, philosophy, wholefood cooking, walking.
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 343,728 - Total Helpful Votes: 15 of 18
Applied Channel Therapy in Chinese Medicine: Wang &hellip by Wang Ju-Yi
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
This gorgeously presented book is ideal for those who have a foundational knowledge of Traditional Chinese Medicine theory and would like to deepen their understanding. It is a series of lectures given by the highly experienced TCM practitioner Wang Ju-Yi, collected and translated by a native English-speaking student who worked closely with Dr Wang for many years.

Dr Wang gives detailed explanations of various theoretical concepts which Western students may find puzzling. Particularly importantly, he explains how the Channels function physiologically in relation to Organ theory. This is a very important addition to the material found in standard English language textbooks. There… Read more
Easy Learning Spanish Grammar and Practice (Collin&hellip by Collins Dictionaries
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I am impressed by this book. I have seen a lot of badly written Spanish exercise books, but this one seems to have been thoroughly thought through. The examples given are all relevant and natural. There are no artificial nonsense sentences. The exercises are quite thorough and material is recycled throughout each section to reinforce difficult points. The vocabulary is kept as simple as possible so that the learner is practising grammar, not vocab, but it is not so simple as to reduce the exercises to nonsense. I'm happy I have finally found a book which is worth working through.
Practice Makes Perfect Basic Spanish (Practice Mak&hellip by Dorothy Richmond
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Atrocious nonsense, 28 Nov 2012
This is probably the worst exercise book of any kind I have ever seen. It appears to have been written by an eccentric amateur who doesn't actually speak Spanish armed with a very unreliable dictionary. Each section begins with a fairly long list of vocabulary. What is the learner supposed to do with the list? Read it? Stare at it? Make it into William Burroughs-style cutups?

We are then presented with a series of ridiculous nonsense sentences to translate. I solemnly promise that if I ever find myself needing to write or say "I want three rats for my mouse" in Spanish then I will change this to a 5-star review, donate 10 to the author's favourite charity and shave my head on… Read more