The Fisher Price King

 
Top Reviewer Ranking: 2,613
Helpful votes received on reviews: 88% (1,270 of 1,442)
Location: London
 

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Top Reviewer Ranking: 2,613 - Total Helpful Votes: 1270 of 1442
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I used to be a big fan of Jonathan Coe, but feel that his work has gone off a bit in recent years. Expo 58 is a return to the comic vein of writing that was typical of Coe up to the time of The Rotters' Club. However, it doesn't show any of the interest in experimenting with form that Coe displayed in, say, What A Carve Up.

Expo 58 is a gentle comedy, which put me in mind of David Lodge - not the campus novels, but the ones about post-War Englishness, such as Out of the Shelter. The main character, Thomas, is a handsome and bored junior civil servant who gets packed off to Belgium to represent Britain at a World's Fair, partly on the grounds that he has a Belgian mother. The plan… Read more
Kiss Me First by Lottie Moggach
Kiss Me First by Lottie Moggach
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
This debut novel from Lottie Moggach (daughter of Deborah Moggach of Best Exotic Marigold Hotel fame) is a pacy and well constructed cross between a psychological thriller and romance.

In tone it reminded me somewhat of Alex Garland's The Beach, though mostly the settings are less exotic (London's Kentish Town and Rotherhithe a lot of the time). The novel's major selling point is that it's about the internet and virtual relationships - in a sense it is about the whole transient, virtual nature of modern living. There are some interesting reflections on the question of how identity is being shaped by social media and other aspects of modernity, and the novel is definitely a… Read more
All That Is by James Salter
All That Is by James Salter
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A new novel from James Salter is a rare thing, so I was looking forward to this a great deal. Salter writes well about ordinary life. He often has great economy as a stylist, saying a lot with a minimum of words. He can craft beautiful sentences. But here there are also weird imprecisions and a tendency to make a single point or observation in two ways, as if the second amplifies the first when in fact it diminishes it.

I never warmed to the main character, Philip Bowman, and the novel seems to strive too hard for a kind of grandeur. Often Salter writes something that sounds impressive but doesn't stand up to scrutiny. For example, "Great publishers were not always great readers,… Read more