J. Vernon

(REAL NAME)
Blow me a wind of inspiration
Helpful votes received on reviews: 90% (180 of 199)
Location: Surrey, UK

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Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 56,905 - Total Helpful Votes: 180 of 199
Jesus for the Non-Religious by John Shelby Spong
Jesus for the Non-Religious by John Shelby Spong
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
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I was lent this book by a friend, and I had finished it within 5 days, having put aside other reading books to enjoy this one. It gave a great intellectual frisson, even a shock. This is a modern theological book that demolishes traditional religion, `rescuing Jesus from the church', as the dust cover proclaims it!

The detailed scholarship of analysing the gospels was most impressive and persuasive. Basically, Spong is arguing that much of what we read there is a literary construct, rather than an eye-witness account. Certainly he regards Jesus as an historical figure, born in Nazareth, and dying on the cross in Jersusalem. But he argues that the Bethlehem birth is a… Read more
John Milton: A Biography by Neil Forsyth
John Milton: A Biography by Neil Forsyth
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
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It is usual to characterise Shakespeare as the greatest poet in English, but given the fact that a large part of Shakespeare's legacy is in drama, one could argue that John Milton is our greatest poet. Or so I am inclined to think, having picked up and read long sections of `Paradise Lost' again recently, spurred on by this biography by Neil Forsyth. It was serendipitous that I encountered this book in the Guildford Cathedral bookshop, showing the joys of browsing in physical bookshops.

This is a manageable biography of Milton, giving us a judicious balance of events in his life, interpretations of his character and views and analysis of his writings. It is not burdened… Read more
House of Meetings by Martin Amis
House of Meetings by Martin Amis
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The house of meetings is a hut where conjugal visits were allowed in the latter part of the Soviet Gulag era. Two brothers are in love with the same woman, and both are in a prison camp in Siberia. The younger brother is married to Zoya, who comes to the camp for a day and a night in the house of meetings. This story is narrated by the elder brother, and how he views and interacts with his brother, his brother's wife, women in general and the sick edifice of the Russian state. The younger brother, Lev, finds a voice, through a letter in the penultimate chapter.

Amis employs a distinctive style, deep and rich in resonances. He is very creative, imagining the whole world of… Read more