Jonathan Davidson

 
Top Reviewer Ranking: 7,841
Helpful votes received on reviews: 94% (140 of 149)
Location: The English Midlands
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 7,841 - Total Helpful Votes: 140 of 149
Destroyed Dresses by Cara Brennan
Destroyed Dresses by Cara Brennan
4.0 out of 5 stars Good short book, 8 Sep 2013
Destroyed Dresses is an excellent title; a suitable combination of the challenging and the domestic. And it is a very nicely designed book, witty without being overpowering. The poems are a perfect sampler of a new writer's work, a range of themes and subjects, but staying reasonably close to 'emotional' home. These are poems about growing up, becoming aware of the subtleties of the world, of time passing already. They are well observed, self-deprecating and self-aware. It is a very enjoyable book of poems, and one which I find I have been carrying around and dipping into for several months.
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Innocent Abroad, 6 Sep 2013
Alfred Hitchcock's 1938 film, The Lady Vanishes - a glorious tale of plucky British resolve pitched against the fascistic tendencies of an unnamed central European state - features a couple of chaps who were destined to spend the rest of their days kicking their heels in the metaphorical cricket pavilion. Jonathan Coe has done a great service in kitting them out in the regulation British Secret Service beige raincoats and Trilbies and sending them out to keep an eye on his protagonist, Thomas Foley, as he stumbles through what turns out to be a sticky diplomatic wicket at Expo 58, Belgium's contribution to the spirit of entente cordial at large in 1958. They are hilarious but just menacing… Read more
A Kind of Eden by Amanda Smyth
A Kind of Eden by Amanda Smyth
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
It is human nature, supposedly, to want to return to the Eden out of which we may have been cast, and in recent years the globe has been criss-crossed by individuals and their families looking for the promised land. In Amanda Smyth's chilling new novel, A Kind of Eden, it is clear from the outset that contemporary Trinidad and Tobago despite - or because of - the blazing sun and luxuriant vegetation is not much of a garden. After all, the central character, Martin, has come from the UK to help improve the Islands' policing, and has had to quick come to terms with an undercurrent of almost casual violence, and shortly afterwards to come to terms with his own personal betrayal of his… Read more