Mcduff

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 84% (76 of 90)
Location: London
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,471,084 - Total Helpful Votes: 76 of 90
London Calling (Inspector Carlyle 1) by James Craig
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
`London calling' introduces us to Inspector John Carlyle, one of the Met's finest, overworked and under-promoted detectives. He's the classic outsider, socially, professionally and culturally, in a world where being an insider is how you succeed. Carlyle is a man of the 80s in all its glory: The Clash (the book is called `London calling'), the miners' strike and Thatcher. He's a man who does not follow the rules of his caste, with a touch of the world-weariness you'd expect from middle age and middle of the road progress in his job. His career hits a new potential low as he becomes the lead in a murder case with links to the top of the new metropolitan power elite.
This is a… Read more
Red Zone: Five Bloody Years in Baghdad by Oliver Poole
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Oliver Poole worked as a foreign correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, covering both the invasion and the subsequent occupation of Iraq and you get a sense (although he never claims it) that there are not many non-Iraqi journalists who can bring five years of on-the-ground experience to bear when commenting on what has happened to this country.

His experience results in an insightful book on an incredibly complex situation and importantly for us, his audience, it's written in an approachable and enjoyable way. It may have been the years he spent explaining complex issues to middle-England in a couple of paragraphs, but he's also managed to make it a very good read… Read more
The Man Who Planted Trees by Jean Giono
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We all love trees, 2 Dec 2007
The title of this short story gives it away. It's the tale of a man's dedication to planting trees, how it has a profound effect on one traveller and a region of south-east France. The message for us in this allegorical tale, is that with focus and dedication on the right thing, we can have an impact which far outweighs our initial effort. This isn't just a book for people who love trees, it's for anyone who recognises the importance of the environment and the need not just to protect, but to help regenerate it.
I found it while staying with friends and read it after everyone had gone to bed - nightime accentuated its sense of mythical.

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