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michaelmcculley

 
Helpful votes received on reviews: 76% (117 of 153)
 

Reviews

Top Reviewer Ranking: 3,685,458 - Total Helpful Votes: 117 of 153
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
'A Child Called It' is, from the onset, a deeply disturbing account of Pelzer's childhood. What is interesting though, is how the autobiographical account manages to remain distant and impassive; it does not blame or accuse - it simply tells the tale. For me, reading this text is a whirl-wind of emotions because frighteningly there are many, many points of empathy with the characters.
While many of us are lucky enough not to have been subjected to the horrors of the Pelzer's experience, there are also uncanny elements of the relationships between all of the family members that do hit raw nerves: the relationship between mother and father; the relationship between father and son; our… Read more
Ariel: The Restored Text by Sylvia Plath
Ariel: The Restored Text by Sylvia Plath
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
'Ariel' is an anthology you'll return to again and again. The wonderful thing about poetry is that it is that it is for everyone. From the transcendental title poem itself (Ariel), through the turbulent and disturbing 'Daddy', to the cutting 'Edge' this anthology consumes you. Deeply personal, yet universally relevent this is Plath at her best, and yet at her worst which is an apposite description of her creative genuis. So often in life in Ted Hughs's shadow, this anthology remains true to the line 'The Woman is Perfected / Her dead body wears the smile of accomplishment' (Edge). The first performance of this poetry engages you, then every time you hear it, it means more, explores more,… Read more
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
10 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A womanist Triumph!, 7 April 2005
'The Color Purple' is an intriguing and insightful window into the life of young Celie. Expressed in letter form we journey with Celie through the torments facing her in the deep South of America. She suffers abuse at the hands of the man she refers to as her 'Father' and the easy-to-follow letter format of the novel means that almost anyone can tap into the world of Celie. Friends described it as Feminist, though I struggled with this term. Others called it 'anti-male'. Though it is true that many traditional patriarchal images are challenged in the novel, the horrors of some of the male characters are not the main focus of the novel, nor do any of the female characters of the novel… Read more

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